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Is Espresso Coffee The Most Potent Type Of Coffee?

Q: Or are there other more exotic types of coffee that have a stronger "hit" with the caffeine?

A: Several good answers in here so far. It looks like answering your question needs several parts. The Beans: The two major varieties of coffee grown in the world today are 'Arabica' and 'Robusta'. 'Robusta' has twice the caffeine content, but is generally considered to be a lower quality coffee, and as such is difficult to find in a reputable coffee shop. However, you will occasionally see Espresso blends with a small amount of 'Robusta', included for its massive influence on the "crema" of the shots. The Roast: The well-touted myth of "darker roasts burn out the caffeine" is just that: a myth. Caffeine is stable up to around 720 degrees Fahrenheit. If your roaster is going that high, he should also be calling the fire department, but what roasting dark does do, is make the beans larger, so if you are brewing by volume (rather than weight), you will end up with less caffeine per cup. The Brew: Roughly twenty percent of a roasted coffee bean is water-soluble, and brewing is the process of getting the good bits of that twenty percent into your cup. While gravity-powered drip-brewing gets you a decent, well-mannered cup of coffee, espresso forces the water through the grounds at 7-9 atmospheres of pressure, forcibly stripping lots of the bits of coffee-ness out of the grounds. The Order: Okay, so you want the best, kick-you-in-your face drink? 1) Find a shop that brews espresso with a robusta blend. 2) Ask for a cup of their lightest roast drip-coffee. 3) Order two shots of espresso in it (a "black eye" to some). 4) Ask that those two shots be pulled "lungo," as long shots will strip even more of the über-stable caffeine out of the beans. 5) Brace yourself.the espresso process has less caffeine than a cup of filter coffee as the water is in contact with the caffeine for a long period of time with the filter process. More importantly, 'Robusta' beans have approx. twice the caffeine content of Arabica beans. Many commercial grade Espresso blends have significant proportions of 'Robusta' beans in them, which is where the caffeine hit comes from, not the Espresso process itself. Don't confuse the strong taste of the coffee with the caffeine effect. It depends on what you mean by potent. If you mean strong tasting, then Espresso could be it. 'Starbucks' makes many of their roasts strong tasting by practically burning the beans. If by potent you mean caffeine, then the strongest are the coastal grown robusta coffees from Thailand and Vietnam. They really don't taste very good as far as coffee connoisseurs are concerned, but they have most caffeineGoats in Tree's blend "Fotally Tocused" Coffee Blend with Added Caffeine. Goats in Tree's has the advantage of being coffee with extra caffeine. We took what was good and made it even better. Drink efficiently, you've been asked to do the work of two people, weak coffee isn't the solution. 'Goats in Tree's' has the advantage of being coffee with extra caffeine. Yes, you read that right, EXTRA Caffeine! We took what was good and made it even better. Drink efficiently, you've been asked to do the work of two people, weak coffee isn't the solution. http://www.goatsintreescoffee.com/Search...

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