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  1. #1
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    Coffee Beans VS Espresso Beans?

    I have been doing some research and just want a clear answer. Is there a difference between Espresso beans and coffee beans.
    From what I have read there isnt a difference and the only difference is how they are brewed.
    Is that a true statement?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by schendela View Post
    I have been doing some research and just want a clear answer. Is there a difference between Espresso beans and coffee beans.
    From what I have read there isnt a difference and the only difference is how they are brewed.
    Is that a true statement?
    Yes, completely True statement.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    Yes, completely True statement.
    Ok. Thank you. I wasnt sure if I had that correct or not.

  4. #4
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    This thru me for a loop as well. I kept seeing beans with Espresso in the name and wondered the same.

    But isn't it true that people that make espresso shots prefer to use a darker roast?

    Also when people talk about drinking expresso is it always the little shots you pull with an espresso machine? Or can it just mean a really strong cup?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duffyjr View Post
    This thru me for a loop as well. I kept seeing beans with Espresso in the name and wondered the same.

    But isn't it true that people that make espresso shots prefer to use a darker roast?

    Also when people talk about drinking expresso is it always the little shots you pull with an espresso machine? Or can it just mean a really strong cup?
    yes, many people thinks that it should be darker roasts, but not true. it can be any types of roast. for our shop, we use Light/Med roast. But you have to grind them Super fine. Yes, espresso (not expresso) is the little shot that you get from an espresso machine. However, how do you define "a really strong cup"? Your "strong" means .... more caffeine? more bitter? darker?

  6. #6
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    And I might add that coffee beans used for espresso many times have robusta added for extra bite and more crema volume.

    Len
    "I believe humans get a lot done, not because we're smart, but because we have thumbs so we can make coffee." ~Flash Rosenberg

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    However, how do you define "a really strong cup"? Your "strong" means .... more caffeine? more bitter? darker?
    Since I've never had an espresso shot all I can go by is what I've read. So let me ask this, if your were an experienced espresso drinker how would you explain to a dripper like me what the difference is, what should I expect or look for in a good shot as far as taste. Super fine grind would suggest to me as being bitter but that is only what I see when grinding for my dripper and I don't have to get any where near fine to start tasting bitter coffee.

    I could probably get on board with using dark/light to describe a cup. For instance, the Sumatra that I just posted about I would describe as dark/stronger than some of the Central American coffees I've had lately. Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica and my current bean is from Panama I would describe all of these as lighter cups.

    We do have a Starbucks here so I could go get one but I'd rather my first espresso shot be a good one

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duffyjr View Post
    Since I've never had an espresso shot all I can go by is what I've read. So let me ask this, if your were an experienced espresso drinker how would you explain to a dripper like me what the difference is, what should I expect or look for in a good shot as far as taste. Super fine grind would suggest to me as being bitter but that is only what I see when grinding for my dripper and I don't have to get any where near fine to start tasting bitter coffee.

    I could probably get on board with using dark/light to describe a cup. For instance, the Sumatra that I just posted about I would describe as dark/stronger than some of the Central American coffees I've had lately. Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica and my current bean is from Panama I would describe all of these as lighter cups.

    We do have a Starbucks here so I could go get one but I'd rather my first espresso shot be a good one
    Super find ground does not mean "bitter" taste at all. I should say it should be called "Bold" taste. If you taste "bitter" in your espresso, it is not a good espresso.

    Actually espresso is way more popular in Europe than USA, specially in Italy, believe it or not, that is all they drink, all day long. When Italian ask for "caffe", automatically, it means a strong shot of espresso. (Actually no one uses the term "espresso" in Italy).

    Besides this "caffe", sometimes they drink Macchiato (espresso + bit of steamed milk). or Americano (espresso + hot water).

    Many people think that espresso is a dark, bitter to burnt flavored roast. (actually, you can see "espresso roast" labeled roasted dark beans in many markets and coffee shops. But it is wrong because espresso is not a type of roast. IT IS A METHOD OF PREPARING COFFEE.

    Espresso coffee is OFTEN (BUT NOT ALWAYS) blended from several different types of coffees (like Guatemalan + Sumatra + bit of high quality Robusta from India for color and crema), but if you go to most of coffee origin countries, such as Guatemala, Colombia, Panama,..etc, they tend to use just one type of coffee to make espresso because THEY CAN NOT GET OTHER COUNTRY COFFEES. (I posted the reasons about this in my many previous postings).

    Anyway, espresso shouldn't be bitter at all.

    And as for "strong coffee", it is not caffeine content. how dark the roast is, how concentrated your coffee is (like espresso).
    it is about water to coffee ratio. Every coffee preparing method has their recommended water to coffee ratio. When you use MORE COFFEE than the recommended ratio, it is called "strong coffee".

  9. #9
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    Packages labelled espresso in grocery stores are done so because of the process of product development. Initially, they come up with the ideal product. They then try to retain some semblance of that taste while cutting the cost out of the product. The product ends up being specialized only for that method of preparation because any other preparation changes the extraction and hence the taste.

    Should you have quality beans............you can almost prep it any way you wish (I did say almost)

  10. #10
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    The flavored beans I have bought are real shiny like what your car would look like after you waxed it. It looks like it is a process of adding oils to the beans. I didn't care for the taste and it left my burr grinder filthy. I think one was Dunkin Donut pumpkin spice.

    Here is a video of them using a cement mixer. Not as funny as Alex's tar pit though.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUta...eature=related

 

 
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