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  1. #1
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    French Press, Espresso, and Drip...Oh MY!

    Imagine you are speaking to an entirely ignorant person, whose knowledge pertains solely to drip-brewed coffee.

    Can we discuss the difference between different roasts and grinds of coffee.
    For example, what is the difference between the grind of French Press coffee, Espresso, and those for other types of brewing methods?

    I assume this question can go in many directions, so it provides a lot of options.

  2. #2
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    There are many different brewing methods for coffee and for each brew method their is a different grind which is appropriate. Turkish coffee requires very very very fine grinds, and in my opinion it’s not possible to get this fine grind on an everyday coffee grinder be it home or commercial. You will need Degirmen, this will grind up the coffe fine enough. It will be almost powderlike. Espresso is only extracted for around 30 seconds therefore the surface area of the grinds must be relatively large. This means grinding up the beans quite fine. I wouldn’t go for the finest setting on the grinder but almost the finest. Dripped coffee should be medium ground. Pressed coffee should be in my opinion ground in between the medium and coarse. The grinds need to be coarse because they’re sitting in the pot for between 3 and 5 minuites.

    As for roasts any roast can be used for any method.
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  3. #3
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    Many will recommend a coarser grind for a french press, but I'm pretty sure that's because a finer grind will seep through the plunger filter and you'll end up with a little "coffee mud" in the bottom of your cup.

    I was getting little to no flavor characteristics from my Kenyan and Ethiopian until I started grinding finer, for my french press. An espresso grind works well for me.

    That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

  4. #4
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    Fineness of grind for various types of brewing

    The variables of extraction in any type of brewing include:

    Fineness of grind
    Time of infusion and extraction
    Temperature of water
    Pressure of extraction

    I'm sure there are others. The way I see it, these are the controls that can be adjusted to reach the desired affect.

    Coarsen the grind and you achieve a lighter extraction, all other variables being equal. Fine the grind and you expose more coffee surface area to extraction, increasing the extraction.

    By increasing the time of extraction you will increase the level of extraction, as in the case of French Press. So the remedy might be to coarsen the grind in order to adjust downward the extraction. You might also shorten the time of the brew.

    You get the idea. Turn your knobs to find what works best for you.

    Mako
    "Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can."
    -Danny Kaye

  5. #5
    FC+
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    I was getting little to no flavor characteristics from my Kenyan and Ethiopian until I started grinding finer, for my french press. An espresso grind works well for me.
    Wow, my wire mesh screen would plug up and scream for mercy. I''d never get the plunger down. You using 2T/cup?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    FC+

    Yes, roughly two rounded tbsp. per 16oz water. My french press is only 32oz, so it's easy to plunge. The grind is so fine, some of it actually passes through the wire mesh screen.

    What does FC+ mean?

  7. #7
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    try a wee bit more coffee...one tbsp per 6 oz of water...see if that helps..also use a coarser ground. If not you will end up with sludge at the bottom.
    FC+ = Roast degree..full city +..then again it could mean something else..
    "Wine is for aging, not coffee."
    Ken Hutchinson, Starsky and Hutch

  8. #8
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    I don't mind a little sludge in my gut Topher, I'm a rough boy like that.

    Depending on the coffee origin and roast degree, I will use a little less or more than 2tbsp. per 16oz mug.

    Word??? FC+ = full city plus? I should know that by now.

  9. #9
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    FC +

    I was going to reply Full City Roast plus but different people use different abbreviations so I wasn't positive. Still could mean something else.
    Jim Lyon
    Jim's Coffee Beans
    relax and roast some beans

 

 

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