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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Boca Raton, FL
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    160
    Quote Originally Posted by Sasha123 View Post
    The best choice will be la marzocco espresso machine were I am using this machine for over 3 years till now I didn't feel any thing bad about this machine. And I think your budget will also suits it. If you are interested in buying that you can contact any la marzocco distributor in your area.
    Uhhh either your spamming, or your half brained dumb..., he's looking at a $200 machine, and your gonna suggest he look at La Marzocco b/c it fits his budget, machines that goes for $6k+ fit his budget of a $200 machine.... LOL. nevermind he said good for a beginning and not expensive lol. You obviously don't work with coffee let alone use a La Marzocco or you wouldn't have said something like that.
    Last edited by Surfer; 02-06-2014 at 06:24 AM.

  2. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    26
    You can get a solid setup for $600 to $1000... Cheaper if you get lucky on craigslist or find someone that is looking to upgrade their setup... I landed my Gagia evolution and a baratza maestro for $150 about 4 years ago and they are both still just as good as the first day I started them up... Obviously you need to check them out real good if you a getting used equipment... Baratza has a refurb spot on their website, check it out...

    La Marzocco machines are great... I use a Linea in my shop... But they are way out of your budget as stated above...

    Echoing previous statements... Invest in a grinder, it is the most important piece...

    As far as the machine, it really depends on what you want out of it... Just shots or shots and solid steaming capability?

    Research, research, research...

    Cheers!
    Chris Zimmerman
    Co-Owner/Operator Ellipsis Coffeehouse

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Michigan, US
    Posts
    1,802
    Quote Originally Posted by Zimmy View Post
    You can get a solid setup for $600 to $1000... Cheaper if you get lucky on craigslist or find someone that is looking to upgrade their setup... I landed my Gagia evolution and a baratza maestro for $150 about 4 years ago and they are both still just as good as the first day I started them up... Obviously you need to check them out real good if you a getting used equipment... Baratza has a refurb spot on their website, check it out...

    La Marzocco machines are great... I use a Linea in my shop... But they are way out of your budget as stated above...

    Echoing previous statements... Invest in a grinder, it is the most important piece...

    As far as the machine, it really depends on what you want out of it... Just shots or shots and solid steaming capability?

    Research, research, research...

    Cheers!

    the price range he is trying to stay is one of the tough guide line to be in "good espresso machine" But i am not saying its impossible.
    I really like what John suggested. And I would never buy used espresso machine from Craigslist.
    Whatever you buy, make sure its 15 bar system.

    Good Luck

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Boca Raton, FL
    Posts
    160
    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeJunky View Post
    the price range he is trying to stay is one of the tough guide line to be in "good espresso machine" But i am not saying its impossible.
    I really like what John suggested. And I would never buy used espresso machine from Craigslist.
    Whatever you buy, make sure its 15 bar system.

    Good Luck
    15 bar is just a marketing gimmick on low end/entry machines, they just do that to make it sound better. Espresso is brewed at 9 bar give or take.

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1
    The closest I can come to "maintenance free" is my Krups CafePresso machine (has coffee pot on one side and espresso setup on the other). This machine has been in continuous daily use since 1988! I bought it when I was overseas in the Navy. It has only had one part replaced in that time, the steam knob... I kept this machine at work and then left it there when I moved on. The friend I gave it to recently retired and gave it back to me. And just in the nick of time. My machine (a Breville 800ESXL) has been repaired twice and just started making an electrical smell and smoking in the last couple of days. I do not know if Krups uses the same (simple) technology any more, but I cannot argue with the longevity of this machine.

  6. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    24
    Are you sure these people (TACE) have any reps in America? I just talked to them, and they told me they don't have anybody in the DC area???

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    11
    If you prefer cappuccino you’ll enjoy using the easy-to-use patented cappuccino frother, which includes a special chamber that mixes steam and milk to create a rich creamy froth achieving perfect drinks every time. You can enjoy espresso or cappuccino without worry with two separate thermostats that control water and steam pressure, so you can make both espresso or cappuccino at the perfect temperature with some top espresso machine.Other highlights include self-priming operation to eliminate pesky start-up preparation, a built-in tamper to take the guesswork out of tamping and a durable, high-quality stainless steel boiler to ensure many years of delicious espresso.
    Some espresso machines only produced more a "darker coffee" then a real espresso. As if you really want to have a great cup with beautiful flavor, I advance you choose a coffee machine at least over $300.
    Last edited by christopher1974; 07-15-2014 at 12:47 AM.

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1
    Believe it or not, I have a Hamilton Beach Espresso machine! My husband thought it would be a perfect "beginners" machine! He also bought me a very nice burr grinder from Williams and Sonoma. I have had both for 3 years and have not failed me yet. We have a local coffee roaster, that also has a coffee shop at the hospital, that I purchase my espresso beans from. I make my own lattes here at home!

  9. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4
    I'm generally a "hands on" type of person, especially with my coffee (roast at home etc...). Can't remember the last time I brewed coffee other than with a V60 or a press. My wife tends to drive me crazy with her creamer (why ruin a perfect cup of coffee ) and espresso drinks she purchases for $5+ dollars so I bit the bullet and decided to purchase an espresso maker for Mothers day. I'm also a bit frugal so spending hundreds of dollars for a top flight machine was out of the question.

    After researching a bit I stumbled upon the Rok Espresso Maker (can't provide a link as my post count is less than 5, sorry). Took me a bit to dial it in, but am now making very good espresso consistently. Very simple design and easy to use in my opinion. Not for everyone of course as it requires a little more work, but it's the approach I enjoy. I use the Baratza Encore for my grinder at a setting of 5 and tamp it pretty hard.

  10. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    NE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by peterjschmidt View Post
    "You get what you pay for" definitely applies here.

    Maintanence-free doesn't apply here; you should anticipate repairs. How long a machine lasts between repairs will vary, but that too is a crap-shoot. Who will do the service, how easy is it to work on if you want to be the one to work on it, how readily available are the parts, etc. are all good questions.

    How enjoyable is the machine to work with, and how repeatable the results are is important too. How will the machine be used; straight espresso, milk drinks, for one person, a couple, parties? I don't do carpentry/home-repair for a living, but I buy the same tools 'they' use, not mainly because they will last longer, but a good well-designed tool is a pleasure to use; a Chinese-made hammer drill from Harbor Freight might last me the six times I'll use it in my life, but a nice Milwaukee hammer drill will make the job easier.

    The question for anyone dabbling with the idea of espresso should really ask themselves 'why?'. Have they had really good espresso, and like it, or is it simply the idea that intrigues them. If a person genuinely knows what great shots can taste like and wants that in their home, then they need to be prepared to spend some serious money to do it. My theory is always to spend more than I think necessary so that I buy a machine that is more capable than my skillset and then grow into it, rather than spend less and find out that it won't perform the way I'd like, and then take a big hit on the drop in value to sell it and buy the equipment I should have bought in the first place.
    In other words, It all depends how far down the rabbit hole your willing to go. Welcome to the beginning of coffee geekdom. Enjoy the journey

 

 
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