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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    Coffee Maker Advice for a Complete Newbie?

    Hi all, I'm looking for some advice for a complete beginner about which coffee maker I should buy.

    I've only been drinking coffee for about a year now, I never used to like it as a kid but recently have started getting into it. I grab a cup from Starbucks most every morning before work and usually at lunch, that is to say I only buy my coffee I don't actually have the means to make it yet.

    Where do I start? I did some Google research but it's all a little confusing and I'd like to talk to some actual people who know what they're doing. Basically I'm just looking for tips on what type of coffee maker is most suitable for beginners, ideally I want one easy to use, not too advanced and not too expensive

    I know my mom has some sort of Keurig coffee maker and I've tried one from that and found it to be okay but I'm not exactly sure which model it is or anything

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Boston, MA
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    9
    It depends how much you want to spend. Every coffee maker is different and does different things so it'll depend on what kind of capabilities you want it to have. If you're just making coffee for yourself and you only drink one or two cups a day then a Keurig like the one your mom has is probably suitable because you can get so many varieties of K-Cup for it and they only make 1 cup at a time.

    Or if you want something that's manual and more traditional (although it takes a little longer and might be a bit harder to master) you could get a French press, you can pick one up for quite cheap and then decide if you want to buy something else. Another alternative to that is the Aeropress which is quite popular, basically like a press but faster and it only makes one cup at a time, a lot of beginners seem to like those.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    725
    I guess the big divide is between whether you want to buy whole bean coffee, or pre ground coffee. You can start off with a blade grinder, but if you want to "do it right", then get a burr grinder. Once you have the ability to covert fresh roasted whole bean coffee into coffee grounds, your brewing method will become more of a factor. Like thcstephen, I would encourage you to get a french press or Aeropress.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2016
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    How much would I be looking at to get a good burr grinder? I would like to grind my own beans if possible since I have heard that's the best possible way to drink coffee

    I've been looking at the Aeropress and I like the look of it and I may buy one but I may also get a coffee machine in addition to that since the Aeropress is so cheap. I think I might prefer a coffee machine with a pot that makes several cups at once too since the rest of my family would probably drink too. I just don't want it to come to too much if I'm buying a grinder too so maybe it will have to be just the Aeropress and the grinder.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    725
    You can get a basic Krups blade grinder for $19.00. A decent burr grinder will cost you about $40.00 to $50.00...I'm talking about a Hario hand grinder not an electric burr grinder. I have a Bodum Bistro electric coffee grinder which sells at Wally World for about $80.00. If you go with the blade grinder, you will want to develop your skill of shaking the grinder as it grinds, and using a count as if you grind too long or do not shake, you will have a lot of fines and dust. Personally, if I were you, I'd step up into at least a burr grinder...make sure it is a conical set as it generates less heat during the grind. My drip machine is a Bunn 10 cup Velocity Brewer...it was a gift, but I like that it brews coffee fast. This is because of the internal reservoir that keeps an on demand batch of water at high temp. When you pour your water in...the fresh water replenishes the on demand water used for your current pot of coffee. I can literally pour in my water, go shave, and have a pot of coffee ready to pour when I'm done.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    18
    Hi,
    If you haven't decided check some reviews , http://jonsguide.org/best-home-espresso-machine-reviews/ and consider what style and format of machine you want.
    Automatic: machine controls time and pressure you just press a button for single or double shot
    Super automatic: machine grinds, tamps, extracts, you just put the cup under and select the drink like a vending machine some froth the milk, and can make lates, cappachinos etc, others have a wand and you steam it like on a semi/auto.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Pawleys Island, SC
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    116
    Mr.Peaberry's advice is all spot-on. I cannot resist adding, for your inexpensive manual method, consider the Clever Dripper and, if your budget permits, for your multi-cup coffeemaker, check out the the SCAA certified machines. That said, I have a friend who is a chef, and very particular, who is delighted with the Bunn Mr.Peaberry recommends. There are many answers to your questions, only you can decide what suits you best. You will likely experiment and evolve over time, but all along the way you will enjoy better coffee than 98% of the population.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    34
    Hey morning_bryan

    AeroPress or the Clever Dripper as Kudzu said. I have the AeroPress! Love it!
    An alternative beginner pour over dripper is the Kalita Wave. I have the Hario V60 and I didn't know when I ordered it, but the V60 has a big whole so it's a little harder to control the water flow to not pour too fast.

    The Clever Dripper has a shut-off valve which only opens when you put it on a cup. So no worries about pouring to fast or slow.

    I have the Bodum Bistro Burr Grinder too, as Mr. Peaberry. The price is great and I really like it!

    If you can, wait for Black Friday! I checked: currently the black Bodum Bistro is $70 at Amazon. I believe last year it was still $100 and I found it on Black Friday for $79.
    But it's already a great price! Just saying...sometimes there are some great deals on drip coffee makers and even burr grinders.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,263
    For an automatic type drip machine I HIGHLY recommend the Bunn Phase Brew. Picked mine up at Lowe's for $99 (glass carafe model) and there is a thermal carafe model for a bit more $. It is unique for a drip machine as it is basically an automatic manual pourover if that makes sense. Instead of spitting/spurting water over the grounds leading to inconsistent temps it fully heats the water in the top reservoir and once it hits around 203 degrees a thermal valve pops open and all the water passes over the grounds in a very steady flow. Total time is 10 minutes for an 8 cup cycle... 6 mins to heat the water and 4 mins to pass thru the basket. I brew black tea in mine, but have had it for 3 years now and not a single issue. Every time I have checked water temp when the thermal valve pops open it has been 203-204 degrees.

    Of course you can go the Aeropress, manual pourover, French press, etc route as well. Really depends on how involved you would like to be with the process. Of course I highly recommend a decent grinder and sourcing the freshest roasted coffee you can find for the best experience possible.
    I'm a legend among my own kind... you my friend are just a legend in your own mind. Later!

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    14
    If you're looking into the french press world, you MUST opt for stainless steel, they are invaluable in terms of durability. I myself have broken multiple glass presses in my day, and frankly became fed up with them. There's a lot of great presses available, there is a few reviewed at 5 Best French Presses - Get the best flavor out of your beans!, only one of which I've personally purchased (Sterling).


    In my opinion all the top stainless steel ones are basically the same, the only real difference is if you're looking for a bigger brew size. I would definitely recommend investing in a french press, they seem daunting at first, but once you get a hang of the process you won't be going back to drip coffee anytime soon.


    Hope that helps! Happy brewing!
    Sandra

 

 
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