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  1. #61
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    The Coffee Gator is an ok canister. I have one. But I find there are others that are almost identical that have the CO2 valve that are about $10 cheaper. I don't know of any canisters that actively push the air out of the canister. I am buying a second one for decaf beans and it won't be the Coffee Gator. I don't see anything about the Coffee Gator that makes it worth $10 more than the no name ones. And the Coffee Gator ones are made in China just like the others. So you're paying for the name. Don't over think the canister. Focus on your grinder, fresh beans and process. Then you'll start enjoying your coffee.
    Last edited by MntnMan62; 08-30-2020 at 02:08 PM.
    Absurdity is the only reality - FZ

  2. #62
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    Thanks for the info MmtnMan62;
    I just want to keep my beans fresh, as I will probably be buying 1lb at a time, and only be using a small amount (for one 16oz cup) every day, so I expect the beans will last me a while.

    Edit: I just read a very simple, and possibly effective no-cost solution (but without the CO2 valve). Ziplok bag.
    Just leave the beans in the bag they came in, and seal the whole thing into a large Ziplok bag. Squeeze Ziplock while zipping to remove as much air as possible.
    Will this work?
    IMHO, Ziplok bags are not what they used to be. I am constantly annoyed by the 'double-zipper' feature which is more difficult to engage than the one larger single one was.

    Edit2: I can ask at the shop when I buy my fresh roasted beans.
    Or, I could roast my own beans... I read that a hot-air popcorn popper can be used as a rudimentary coffee roaster. What do you think?
    Last edited by Ultrarunner2020; 08-30-2020 at 03:15 PM.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrarunner2020 View Post
    Thanks for the info MmtnMan62;
    I just want to keep my beans fresh, as I will probably be buying 1lb at a time, and only be using a small amount (for one 16oz cup) every day, so I expect the beans will last me a while.

    Edit: I just read a very simple, and possibly effective no-cost solution (but without the CO2 valve). Ziplok bag.
    Just leave the beans in the bag they came in, and seal the whole thing into a large Ziplok bag. Squeeze Ziplock while zipping to remove as much air as possible.
    Will this work?
    IMHO, Ziplok bags are not what they used to be. I am constantly annoyed by the 'double-zipper' feature which is more difficult to engage than the one larger single one was.

    Edit2: I can ask at the shop when I buy my fresh roasted beans.
    Or, I could roast my own beans... I read that a hot-air popcorn popper can be used as a rudimentary coffee roaster. What do you think?
    I would recommend not using a ziplock bag. First of all, it allows light to get at the beans. Light is not the friend of beans you want to keep fresh for about a month. I say a month because I too only drink a cup or two a day so a pound lasts me about a month, sometimes longer. The other thing about a zip lock is that if you end up getting very freshly roasted beans, you will need to release the CO2 as the beans de-gas. The fresher the roast, the more CO2 is released early on. You don't want to have an exploding ziplock sending your precious beans all over your kitchen. A proper canister with a CO2 valve for between $15 adn $20 is money well spent. You don't need to spend more than that. It will keep out the light, keep out the oxygen and allow the CO2 to escape. Pretty simple.

    As for roasting at home, I have no desire to do that. There is a steep learning curve associated with roasting beans and lots to know. How do you know what kind of green beans to get and from where? How do you judge the green beans for your desired taste and preferred type of roast? When do I stop the roasting? And then I've heard from those who do roast that roasting in the house is not advisable because the smell is incredibly pungent. So if you happen to live with a significant other, they may not take too kindly to your new hobby. But hey, if you have the time and patience to do it, more power to ya.
    Absurdity is the only reality - FZ

  4. #64
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    Thanks for the heads up. i was thinking I would keep the beans in the original bag, then place that into the ziplok, but I had forgotten about the CO2.
    I'm not serious about roasting my own beans. I read that even the roasting house gets it wrong sometimes, leading to a bad batch, which you don't know about until you taste the brew. I guess that's a good reason to stick with a roaster once you find you like the beans and they are consistent.

    Funny you should mention the smell of roasting coffee beans. I attended the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken NJ back when Maxwell House was located just up the road. When the wind was right (or wrong), you would get that smell out on the field and around campus. It got to be really unpleasant sometimes. I didn't drink much coffee in those days...ha.

    Edit: Just had a thought. Why does a canister need a CO2 release valve if you are opening it daily?
    From what I have read, only freshly roasted beans (within the first day or two) will release a significant amount of CO2. So, wouldn't simply opening the lit to remove beans release all of the CO2?
    Last edited by Ultrarunner2020; 08-31-2020 at 07:07 AM.

  5. #65
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    I am actually starting to get some acceptable coffee from my beans, grinder, and the French Press.
    While certainly not a really good cup of coffee, what I have been getting for the past two mornings is relatively good. More flavor, and not so much bitterness.
    I have decreased the coffee to water ratio, so I am now using 1.5 oz beans to 16 fl oz water. This calculated to a 1:11.8 ratio, compared to the 1:13.8 ratio I was using before.
    I have also been waiting nearly a full minute after the water boils in the (stovetop) tea kettle before pouring into the press.
    I am still using a medium grind (in the Cusinart DBM- but this morning notched one towards coarse, so now I think I have it a 3rd notch on coarse side of medium.
    I will be ordering the 1ZPresso JX very soon, but as I said in an earlier post, it won't be available (from Amazon) for shipment until 9/14.
    I have, as you have already pointed out, that plunging does not affect the flavor or bitterness. Plunging does allow me to get the full 16 oz coffee from the pot. If I do not plunge, some liquid is left with the grounds on the bottom.
    Last, but certainly not least, I am using Coffee Mate (liquid) creamer. I don't use much, and never add extra sweetner (there is plenty in the creamer) but I find it really makes a big difference in the 'acceptability' of the coffee. I am hoping though, that once I get better/fresher beans and the better grinder, I will be able to drink it black.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultrarunner2020 View Post
    I am actually starting to get some acceptable coffee from my beans, grinder, and the French Press.
    While certainly not a really good cup of coffee, what I have been getting for the past two mornings is relatively good. More flavor, and not so much bitterness.
    I have decreased the coffee to water ratio, so I am now using 1.5 oz beans to 16 fl oz water. This calculated to a 1:11.8 ratio, compared to the 1:13.8 ratio I was using before.
    I have also been waiting nearly a full minute after the water boils in the (stovetop) tea kettle before pouring into the press.
    I am still using a medium grind (in the Cusinart DBM- but this morning notched one towards coarse, so now I think I have it a 3rd notch on coarse side of medium.
    I will be ordering the 1ZPresso JX very soon, but as I said in an earlier post, it won't be available (from Amazon) for shipment until 9/14.
    I have, as you have already pointed out, that plunging does not affect the flavor or bitterness. Plunging does allow me to get the full 16 oz coffee from the pot. If I do not plunge, some liquid is left with the grounds on the bottom.
    Last, but certainly not least, I am using Coffee Mate (liquid) creamer. I don't use much, and never add extra sweetner (there is plenty in the creamer) but I find it really makes a big difference in the 'acceptability' of the coffee. I am hoping though, that once I get better/fresher beans and the better grinder, I will be able to drink it black.
    Whether you plunge or not, you leave the same amount of liquid behind. I do believe that plunging creates bitter coffee. That's why I don't do it. I may not have made that clear in a prior post. But you gotta do what you gotta do. Coffee Mate? Ugh. Regular milk would be a vast improvement. So, let me understand this. You are spending lots of time trying to evaluate the quality of your coffee that you make when you are using a crappy grinder, old stale beans and Coffee Mate? God man. Now I know why you can't seem to get a decent cup of coffee. Let us know when you have fresh beans, a decent grinder and you stop using that Coffee Mate garbage.
    Absurdity is the only reality - FZ

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by MntnMan62 View Post
    I would recommend not using a ziplock bag. First of all, it allows light to get at the beans. Light is not the friend of beans you want to keep fresh for about a month. I say a month because I too only drink a cup or two a day so a pound lasts me about a month, sometimes longer. The other thing about a zip lock is that if you end up getting very freshly roasted beans, you will need to release the CO2 as the beans de-gas. The fresher the roast, the more CO2 is released early on. You don't want to have an exploding ziplock sending your precious beans all over your kitchen. A proper canister with a CO2 valve for between $15 adn $20 is money well spent. You don't need to spend more than that. It will keep out the light, keep out the oxygen and allow the CO2 to escape. Pretty simple.

    As for roasting at home, I have no desire to do that. There is a steep learning curve associated with roasting beans and lots to know. How do you know what kind of green beans to get and from where? How do you judge the green beans for your desired taste and preferred type of roast? When do I stop the roasting? And then I've heard from those who do roast that roasting in the house is not advisable because the smell is incredibly pungent. So if you happen to live with a significant other, they may not take too kindly to your new hobby. But hey, if you have the time and patience to do it, more power to ya.
    Home roasting is very fulfilling and I highly recommend it to anybody truly serious about the craft, BUT it is involved and does require quite an understanding of the process. For many years I bought from commercial roasters for home/commercial use and have done tens of thousands of extractions from thousands of pounds of fresh/quality coffee. I grew tired of the direction many roasters were taking with the lighter development, the cost, etc. I knew if others could successfully roast I damn sure could. I had consumed so much espresso I knew what origins, process methods, etc. I liked most. I devised/built my setup, bought some quality greens that had notes of the taste/texture I was looking for and I went to it. I've tried all sorts of greens, blends, SOs, etc. and have pretty much settled on a handful of blends and just a few SOs. What I try to keep onhand is pretty much available year round and is quite consistent batch-batch. Regarding the popper method... you can indeed get decent coffee from a popper, but the crazy fast times they roast at won't give much development for rich flavor, heavy body, etc. You can roast with pretty much anything provided you can control the heat, agitation, etc. Thing is to find something that works good for you and be able to repeat that. This is a fairly recent batch of a Brazil Daterra Reserve Espresso I did. Outstanding color, balance, etc. and was quite good in the demitasse.

    Giving up on Keurig, tried stove-top perc, want to try French Press-5ttnprx.jpg
    I'm a legend among my own kind... you my friend are just a legend in your own mind. Later!

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadow745 View Post
    Home roasting is very fulfilling and I highly recommend it to anybody truly serious about the craft, BUT it is involved and does require quite an understanding of the process. For many years I bought from commercial roasters for home/commercial use and have done tens of thousands of extractions from thousands of pounds of fresh/quality coffee. I grew tired of the direction many roasters were taking with the lighter development, the cost, etc. I knew if others could successfully roast I damn sure could. I had consumed so much espresso I knew what origins, process methods, etc. I liked most. I devised/built my setup, bought some quality greens that had notes of the taste/texture I was looking for and I went to it. I've tried all sorts of greens, blends, SOs, etc. and have pretty much settled on a handful of blends and just a few SOs. What I try to keep onhand is pretty much available year round and is quite consistent batch-batch. Regarding the popper method... you can indeed get decent coffee from a popper, but the crazy fast times they roast at won't give much development for rich flavor, heavy body, etc. You can roast with pretty much anything provided you can control the heat, agitation, etc. Thing is to find something that works good for you and be able to repeat that. This is a fairly recent batch of a Brazil Daterra Reserve Espresso I did. Outstanding color, balance, etc. and was quite good in the demitasse.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    If I were drinking espresso I'd probably jump into the roasting game. But I'm just doing french press so it really isn't worth it for me. Plus, I don't think I have the patience for it. If I do pick up the espresso thing I'd consider roasting once I got a handle on what I like in a bean.
    Absurdity is the only reality - FZ

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by MntnMan62 View Post
    Whether you plunge or not, you leave the same amount of liquid behind. I do believe that plunging creates bitter coffee. That's why I don't do it. I may not have made that clear in a prior post. But you gotta do what you gotta do. Coffee Mate? Ugh. Regular milk would be a vast improvement. So, let me understand this. You are spending lots of time trying to evaluate the quality of your coffee that you make when you are using a crappy grinder, old stale beans and Coffee Mate? God man. Now I know why you can't seem to get a decent cup of coffee. Let us know when you have fresh beans, a decent grinder and you stop using that Coffee Mate garbage.
    Yes. I am ordering the 1ZPresso JX from Amazon now, but will have to wait two weeks before it arrives. Before ordering, I'll check to see if it's in stock somewhere else.
    Once I get the grinder, I will purchase fresh beans locally.
    I am going to try milk in my cup tomorrow morning. Thanks for reminding me about it. For some reason, I guess force of habit - I reach for the Coffee Mate.

  10. #70
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    Update: I ordered the 1ZPresso JX Pro (the JX is no longer available at Amazon, and on 1ZPresso website is indicated out of stock) and the AirScape 7inch (16oz beans) canister.
    The AirScape should arrive by 9/3, but I'll have to wait until 9/9 for the grinder.
    Once I have the grinder, I will buy my beans (from a local roaster).

 

 
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