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Thread: The Aerobie????

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by richedie
    I have to get one of these new gadgets soon...the Aerobie or Tirra French Pull soon. Maybe I need a burr grinder before anything! Even with the blade grinder...I still make better coffee at home than most coffee shops in our area.
    Right on!

    Until recently I thought good coffee was out of reach of an average consumer like me. That turns out to be so untrue. It's ironic that with a kettle, fresh beans, a good grinder, maybe a thermometer and an inexpensive french press you can make coffee that most coffee shops and drip coffee makers can't touch.

    A french press is a great investment. It makes a good cup and you can tailor the extraction to your preference. A vacuum press is good too- I find it smoother and cleaner in the cup than the french press and it's a good extraction method as well.

    A good grinder should improve your coffee. The more even the grounds the more even the extraction and you'll probably be able to taste the difference. I switched from a cuisinart whirley blade to a Zassenhaus knee mill and the coffee did noticably improve.
    Grinder: Macap M4 stepless, Zassenhaus kneemill
    Machine: Quickmill Vetrano, Olympia Cremina '67
    Brewers: Yama 5cup, ibrik, Bodum e Santos, french press, pour over drip
    Roaster: Hottop programmable

  2. #12
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    I am going to get a burr grinder soon! I have to say that manual drip also makes a GREAT cup as well.

    Finally, that new Tirra French Pull looks great! I am getting one!

    The Aerobie I guess is like a vacuum press?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by richedie
    I am going to get a burr grinder soon! I have to say that manual drip also makes a GREAT cup as well.

    Finally, that new Tirra French Pull looks great! I am getting one!

    The Aerobie I guess is like a vacuum press?
    Plunging with the Aerobie Aeropress develops pressure. A vacuum press works with pressure as well. A vacuum press is pretty cool to watch. During vacuum press extraction a vacuum is generated which draws water down through your grounds into a carafe. The filter screens out the grinds from the top like the Aeropress method as opposed to the bottom like a french press. I'm just guessing that the vacuum pressure might be higher than say with a french press and closer to the pressure you get when plunging with an Aerobie.
    Grinder: Macap M4 stepless, Zassenhaus kneemill
    Machine: Quickmill Vetrano, Olympia Cremina '67
    Brewers: Yama 5cup, ibrik, Bodum e Santos, french press, pour over drip
    Roaster: Hottop programmable

  4. #14
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    mrgnomer,

    The thing I look for in coffee is full, rich, nutty, and rich.........so would French Press, drip or Percolator be a better method? It seems anything using a filter can rob some oils and flavor....although Melitta is making a new Flavor Brew filter allowing more oil to pass.

    The other thing is that I believe you want a fine grind for the best extraction. But this become a problem with French Press and Percs. I have been looking at the new Tirra coffee pull but this would require a more coarse grind as well.

    Maybe I need to move onto espresso.......but I do not like the tiny servings you get with espresso.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by richedie
    mrgnomer,

    The thing I look for in coffee is full, rich, nutty, and rich.........so would French Press, drip or Percolator be a better method? It seems anything using a filter can rob some oils and flavor....although Melitta is making a new Flavor Brew filter allowing more oil to pass.

    The other thing is that I believe you want a fine grind for the best extraction. But this become a problem with French Press and Percs. I have been looking at the new Tirra coffee pull but this would require a more coarse grind as well.

    Maybe I need to move onto espresso.......but I do not like the tiny servings you get with espresso.
    Yeah, the tiny servings could be an issue when you're used to full cups of coffee. It's one of the things that compromises cafe espresso, I think. Cafe's would tend to pull for long shots to up the volume and keep N.A. customers who aren't used to small servings of coffee happy. Quantity over quality makes for not so good espresso.

    A good regular espresso is about 2 oz for a double and less for a denser restricted shot. Still, if you get a taste for the richness and deep flavour of an espresso the quality of a good shot is much more important than the quantity. Less becomes more. If you want to stretch a shot or if straight espresso is too intense for you , you can always add some heated water to make an Americano.

    Grinding fine will increase extraction but it's not always the way to go. Grinding too fine or steeping too long or using water that's too hot will overextract grinds and give you bitterness. As far as I know, French press is an ideal method of brewing that lets a lot of oils through. I think it's in the screen. The french press screen is not as fine as other brewing methods and the steep time is about 3 minutes, depending on your taste, and with the grinds sitting on the bottom while the filter screens them from the top the oils float through. The coarser screen means more slurry getting through as well so the french press cup using a fine grind will have some sludge.

    The inventor of the Aeropress is talking about marketing coarser screens so theoretically it'll be possible to brew a cup with more coffee oils.

    But, if you're looking for full, rich, nutty, rich coffee, I'd say espresso is the way to go. The extraction process of espresso draws out more coffee oils than any other method by virtue of the water pressure that's exerted on the grinds. It's in the crema and a good shot is almost 100% crema to the end of the pull. That's suspended coffee oils that do settle out over time but fill a cup with rich foam during the pull. The taste of espresso is very particular but if you have a taste for it you may find it superior to all brewed coffee. That can explain espresso obsession and why some home baristas have grinder, machine and accessory set ups that cost more than their cars. There is some skill required to pull espresso from a good semi automatic machine with respect to preparing the grinds for extraction and understanding your machine to ensure ideal extraction which might be bothersome for some but if you're a hand's on kind of person and like espresso it's part of the fun and attraction.

    I don't know how much of an investment you want to make but a french press, moka pot and Aeropress all together probably won't cost more than a mid to high end drip machine. Drip machines take away the control of too many variables like grind saturation, steep time and water temp and they are notorious for doing it badly. Personally I'd go with the method that gives the greatest amount of control to the brewer. That would end up being fully manual methods where you controlled all the variables that go into making good coffee. Get a good burr grinder that grinds evenly, use the freshest beans you can and experiment with grinds, steep times, water temp, grind quantity...until you find the method that suits your taste. I don't have experience with either a moka pot or perculator so I can't say what kind of coffee they brew but the opinions I've read say they do a good job at making strong coffee.
    Grinder: Macap M4 stepless, Zassenhaus kneemill
    Machine: Quickmill Vetrano, Olympia Cremina '67
    Brewers: Yama 5cup, ibrik, Bodum e Santos, french press, pour over drip
    Roaster: Hottop programmable

  6. #16
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    Thanks, I have not heard of the moka pot other than in passing but I hear it is good! I am going to grab one of those Tirra French Pulls, but with the fact that it pulls effect the amount of oils making through the screen?

    I use a manual drip which I like over an auto drip! I also use my perc and french press but not sure about the Aero Press. Although they claim the Aero make GREAT espresso.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by richedie
    Thanks, I have not heard of the moka pot other than in passing but I hear it is good! I am going to grab one of those Tirra French Pulls, but with the fact that it pulls effect the amount of oils making through the screen?

    I use a manual drip which I like over an auto drip! I also use my perc and french press but not sure about the Aero Press. Although they claim the Aero make GREAT espresso.
    I've been using the Aeropress for about two weeks and it does make good coffee if you follow the directions it comes with. The inventor apparently did a lot of testing and came up with an extraction formula that makes strong but smooth coffee. You've got to use a lot of grounds to get the strength and fine grind them so they resist the pressure exerted by the plunger. To avoid bitterness due to over extraction a lower than normal water temp (175F, I believe) and a short extraction time is recommended . The extraction time is 10 sec of stirring for saturation and 20 sec plunging time. It makes for a quick method of brewing coffee but I've found that even my stale beyond knowing grounds taste pretty good with the Aeropress. The balance between a high amount of grounds but a cooler brewing temp and shorter extraction is good for making strong, smooth coffee.

    Being all plastic, light and a pretty compact package the Aeropress would also travel well so it's a great choice for camping or road trips. It's very easy to clean as well since the grinds get most of the water squeezed out of them and what you're left with is a puck that's almost as dry as an espresso puck that you just push out of the chamber. The parts rinse clean and even the filter can be rinsed out and used again until it rips or falls apart, which according to the inventor is about 20 times.

    I got it because it wasn't expensive and being into coffee I had to try it. I'm glad I did get one because I think I'd take an Aeropress with me camping now instead of my glass carafe french press.

    I think the Tirra French press is the same as a regular french press except that it seems to have a finer screen to screen out grinds. It could also screen out more oils but I don't know for sure.
    Grinder: Macap M4 stepless, Zassenhaus kneemill
    Machine: Quickmill Vetrano, Olympia Cremina '67
    Brewers: Yama 5cup, ibrik, Bodum e Santos, french press, pour over drip
    Roaster: Hottop programmable

  8. #18
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    So, is it a bad idea to use too fine a grind for drip? Sometimes I'll grind very fine for my manual drip at home.

    Maybe I'll have to grab an AeroPress soon!

    How do you know the Tirra seems to have a more fine screen for filtering? I read a review that said it works well and keeps the oils in tact similar to a French Press.......but less sediment and also less contimuous contact with the water since you lift it up and out. maybe it isn't worth it since I have a french Press.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by richedie
    So, is it a bad idea to use too fine a grind for drip? Sometimes I'll grind very fine for my manual drip at home.

    Maybe I'll have to grab an AeroPress soon!

    How do you know the Tirra seems to have a more fine screen for filtering? I read a review that said it works well and keeps the oils in tact similar to a French Press.......but less sediment and also less contimuous contact with the water since you lift it up and out. maybe it isn't worth it since I have a french Press.
    I'm assuming the Tirra has a finer screen since less sediment is left behind. I've never used one so I don't know for sure but it does look like a modified french press.

    Fine grind for drip coffee could be hit and miss if the coffee brewing temp is high and the water doesn't saturate all the grinds in the filter. There's some drip machines that shower the grinds to fully saturate them but, from what I know, with most drip machines the water 'drips' through the grinds in one spot. That spot will get more hot water on it than the rest of the grinds and it could get over extracted.

    A fine grind could also choke up the filter you're using and not allow the water the pass through as quickly. A finer grind is easier to over extract if the water temp is high or the steep time is long so you could get stronger but more bitter cup of coffee. If you're using fine grinds and the cup is bitter, I'd say it's from over extraction and grinding coarser should correct that.
    Grinder: Macap M4 stepless, Zassenhaus kneemill
    Machine: Quickmill Vetrano, Olympia Cremina '67
    Brewers: Yama 5cup, ibrik, Bodum e Santos, french press, pour over drip
    Roaster: Hottop programmable

  10. #20
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    Thanks for the information.....I always thought you always wanted a fine grind for the best extraction but I guess that isn't so! I wanted to say that my drip is manual drip......I like to have 100% control. I control the grind, the water temperature and the amount of saturation, plus the brew time. It seems I get the best results with a medium to find grind with a temp a bit below boiling.

 

 
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