Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    6

    Krups XP4020 - Wet pucks

    Greetings coffee-experts!

    I currently own a Krups XP4020 espresso machine and since day 1, although I've been able to get good shots occasionally, never once was the puck dry upon removal. There's always water that's filled to the brim of the portafilter when removed. I've read that it's caused by the crema-enhancing contraption in the portafilter. Is there any solution to this? Although it's not a very serious problem, cleaning the portafilter can create a big mess.

    Also, I can never produce a good froth with the steaming wand from this machine. Thanks in advance for all replies!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,564
    Yeah the pressurized baskets are part of the problem, but the other issue is the lack of a 3-way solenoid that sucks the pressure off the puck after extraction.

    Describe your steaming/frothing technique to us.... What type of milk do you use? Later!
    I'm a legend among my own kind... you my friend are just a legend in your own mind. Later!

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the reply! So does that mean I'm pretty much out of luck?

    I use the regular cold fresh milk, pasturised and homogenised (Farmhouse brand from Aussie). I froth the milk in a steel jug, moving it in circles around the steaming wand, starting from the bottom to the middle of the jug. Once the jug gets too hot to hold, I stop. I don't have a proper thermometer to check the temperature though.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,564
    I wouldn't say out of luck...... That's one of the kissues with not having the 3-way. I know it's a little messy (I owned a machine with the same issue) but it doesn't interfere with getting good shots.

    Here's what I have found for the best steaming/frothing: I always keep the stainless pitcher in the freezer to give it that chilled effect. Then once I pour in my whole milk in, I put the pitcher back in the freezer until an ice ring forms around the top of the milk. Then I purge the steam wand of any excess moisture, so no water is added to the milk. My machine allows me to move the steam wand in any position I need, so I tilt it at a 45 degree angle and barely submerge the tip. I open the valve maybe 20-30% and get a whirlpool effect going. If you want to froth more simply keep the tip closer to the surface to incorporate more air. If you want to do more steaming and not so much expanding keep it lower in the milk. Some people like to move the pitcher up/down and all around, but I keep it still and let the jet of steam do all the work. If you don't have a thermometer listen closely for a temp. change. Once the milk hits around 140 degrees it will become a much deeper growl and you know it's close. Much higher than that and you'll be scalding it. Hope this helps.

    BTW, does your machine have any sort of tip on the steam wand itself? Later!
    I'm a legend among my own kind... you my friend are just a legend in your own mind. Later!

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    6
    I guess I'll leave the wet puck aside.

    As for frothing, I managed to get something decent this afternoon (ie. good enough to do some basic artwork after everything's been poured in). However, the milk isn't sufficiently smooth to pour a leaf or a heart.

    I'll give your technique a shot in 2 days time and I'll let you know. The thing is, the output of the valve cannot be controlled so it's 100% all the way. The wand does have a tip but I'm not sure if you're referring to the same thing. See http://www.anothercoffee.co.uk/products/item100402.aspx. Thanks a million for your fantastic tips!

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,564
    Yeah the steam being 100% all or nothing is a pain in the butt. My first pump machine also had that problem.

    Is your tip removable from the steam wand itself? If so try it without it if the steam wand alone is long enough. Problem with most wand attachments is that they incorporate too much air before the milk is properly heated and that ruins the texture.

    In order to get the milk silky smooth throughout, it takes some finesse to get just the right amount of air incorporated, otherwise you'll have thick froth on top and steamed milk on bottom. Properly prepared milk should be silky and glossy in appearance (with no bubbles) and there should be no visual evidence of separation. Practice a bit and see what you can achieve. Instead of moving the pitcher all around, let the steam do the work if the machine has enough grunt. Later!
    I'm a legend among my own kind... you my friend are just a legend in your own mind. Later!

 

 

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Krups 7220
    By rggomes in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-10-2008, 09:46 AM
  2. Krups KM7000
    By BostonBull in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-11-2007, 06:23 PM
  3. Krups FNA
    By pewe101 in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-01-2007, 03:22 AM
  4. Krups XP 4000
    By haytoniaho in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-15-2007, 08:04 AM
  5. Krups
    By feltgrape in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-04-2007, 02:19 PM

Search tags for this page

krups 4020
,

krups 4020 parts

,
krups espreso 4020 parts bay
,
krups espresso machine xp4020
,

krups steam wand

,

krups xp 4020

,

krups xp4020

,

krups xp4020 parts

,
krups xp4020 price
,
krups xp4020 steam wand
,
wet puck krups
,

xp4020

Click on a term to search for related topics.