Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    4

    Should I get a job at a cafe?

    I have a great idea to start a coffee place, but I''ve never worked in a cafe and I''ve never really made the coffee drinks that would be required to start a cafe business. Should I get a job at a cafe just to see how things are done? I wouldn''t steal their recipies or anything, I just don''t know the first thing about making a latte, mocha, coffee con letche, etc. Thanks in advance for your advise.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    576
    You may want to "search" this site for the keyword job, and also read my blog entry on the subject from last year:

    http://www.coffeestrategies.com/2006/11 ... experience

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    4

    Thanks

    Thanks for the reply. I appreciate your input and I understand your point. I subsequently found a couple "barista school"s on the internet. Is this a good way to go?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    576
    We believe that on-site training by a professional is the only way for you and your staff to effectively learn a new performance skill:

    http://www.cafemakers.com/barista-training.html

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    29
    All due respect to Cafemakers but I don't think one answer fits all here. It's true that you might pick up bad habits and techniques but only if you don't choose where to 'intern' wisely and/or if you don't think you can filter out the bad stuff in your head.

    Training IS essential though, wherever you might get that.


    check your pm.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    576
    You're right - I'm in complete agreement with you that no one answer fits every situation.

    If you happen to select one of the few coffee shops in America that serve outstanding coffee, you will be in good shape. However, it's extremely difficult for the novice to identify what outstanding coffee -is- and learn to differentiate between industry best practices and the many myths and sloppy procedures that are used by the "average" shop.

    Having just spent a week training new recruits at a business back East, I found (again) that trainees with no experience were able to absorb new content faster than those with other coffee shop (chain or otherwise) experience.

    People that have worked at Starbucks and other businesses have a tendency to fall back on what they know from their prior actions; for example, froth milk to exceedingly high temperatures or small but important techniques, such as flushing the group heads regularly or wiping portafilter baskets dry. The "fresh" mind tends to be much more willing to accept this information when trained properly the first time.

    Additionally, as I point out in my blog entry, those systems and procedures that are designed for a 100 or 10,000 unit chain are not necessarily the ones that you want to implement in your small business. Learning to "cook like McDonald's" is probably not the best approach for a new high-end restaurant. Similarly, you do not want to take your book of operations from the local "greasy spoon," and yet, it's what so many new business owners do when attempting to gain experience in this manner.

    If you are lucky enough to have one of the "greats" in your backyard, know who they are, and can convince them to hire you, then good for you. For most, it's just not practical to move themselves and their staff to another town just to gain experience - that experience must come to them.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    DFW, Texas
    Posts
    113
    Andrew,
    You basically just answered the next question I was going ask on the forum... So in your experience, it would be better to hire someone green to the industry as a barista, instead of someone who has had experience with another company?
    Thanks,
    Laura

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    92
    With respect, actually going to location is also a great way to accomplish a thorough training class (I do both). The difficult part of on site training is that by necessity the training is often scheduled close to opening and the owner is so busy dealing with the fire marshall, the building inspector, the new vendors/supplier, running last minute errands, etc. that they may not be able to focus on training. Often the owner (the one who needs the training most) is distracted and the employees get the best training (OK, unless the employee leaves).

    I agree that both ways have advantages/disadvantages. A couple of advantages of people coming to our location for training are: It is more economical, people can focus on training (rather than the last minute demands of opening their store), people get to see and work in a busy operation, and let's face it, it is fun to travel to another place and get training.

    And I would not fully agree that those with former training are more difficult to train. As a matter of fact a capable person with a foundation (even if flawed) will build on what they already know. Enlightenment will come to them and they will change and improve. Hopefully, owners and employees still learn, grow and improve during the year. I continue to learn and change what we do to improve. And that translates into our training program (whether at our location or the clients).

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    576
    Quote Originally Posted by billagirly
    Andrew,
    You basically just answered the next question I was going ask on the forum... So in your experience, it would be better to hire someone green to the industry as a barista, instead of someone who has had experience with another company?
    Thanks,
    Laura
    I always prefer candidates that are 1) enthusiastic, 2) smart (not necessarily educated) and 3) have a stable and reliable job performance history. I realize that many baristas are just starting their careers or looking for a part-time position, but you can look for other indicators (consistent involvement with education, social or civic groups, for example) that will supplement employment history. Turn every resume into the story of a person's professional life -- question chapters that are missing or don't fit.

    "Love coffee" is a plus, but not necessary -- I've known a few vegetarians that are outstanding chefs at restaurants serving meat. You can teach them to "know coffee," which is far more important.

    As I mentioned above, prior experience can be a drawback when it comes to coffee preparation because so many coffee shops go about things all wrong. Furthermore, emphasis on that candidate's prior experience may be disruptive to management of your entire crew - you don't need a "star" behind the bar, you need a team of workers trained to consistently perform to your standards.

    When you are confident that your approach to beverage preparation and shop operation is correct, be weary of trainees that say "well, that's not how we did it at..."

    Andrew

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    576
    Quote Originally Posted by jpscoffee
    The difficult part of on site training is that by necessity the training is often scheduled close to opening and the owner is so busy dealing with the fire marshall, the building inspector, the new vendors/supplier, running last minute errands, etc. that they may not be able to focus on training. Often the owner (the one who needs the training most) is distracted and the employees get the best training (OK, unless the employee leaves).
    You could not be more right about that! That's exactly why we do not provide training al a carte for startups other than as a part of our startup program (including business consulting and training). The process must be managed very carefully to ensure that 1) the location is suitably ready for training, with necessary permits 2) ALL personnel are hired and available at scheduled times and 3) we have all supplies and ingredients available. You cannot conduct a class in a construction zone!

    Andrew

 

 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Gene cafe
    By topher in forum Coffee Roasters
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-29-2008, 08:32 PM
  2. The popular cafe
    By Var in forum Coffee Shops, Espresso Bars & Cafes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-22-2008, 11:16 AM
  3. New Cafe STartup
    By Bailey99 in forum Business to Business B2B
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-26-2006, 01:24 PM
  4. cafe name - need help
    By Dann in forum Coffee Shops, Espresso Bars & Cafes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-27-2005, 12:32 PM
  5. cafe lobo
    By cafekubal in forum Coffee Roasters
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-02-2005, 02:18 PM

Search tags for this page

getting a job at a coffee shop with no experience
,
getting a job in a cafe
,
how to find cafe jobs
,

how to get a cafe job

,
how to get a cafe job with no experience
,

how to get a job at a cafe

,

how to get a job at a coffee shop with no experience

,

how to get a job at cafe

,

how to get a job in a cafe

,
how to get a job in a cafe with no experience
,
how to get a job in cafe?
,
what to do to get a job in cafe
Click on a term to search for related topics.