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  1. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1
    I picked up a pair of black sketchers made for Restaurant work several years ago. They've got super grippy anti-slip soles and no laces, and are pretty comfortable for working hours on end. I think they were part of a Sketchers "Work Shoes" line - construction boots and such.

    Anyway, long story short, look for a good pair of boots made for restaurant work...that or just a pair of Crocs. That's what all those chefs at fancy restaurants wear all day long.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    203
    There's no secret answer that fits all. I need good lateral support.
    Orthotics are a good way to go because they distribute the weight across your foot evenly and hold you feet the way they want to be placed.
    Red Wings make good work shoes
    I am not on my feet all day, but Asics are good shoes. Try their X-training shoes.

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Monroe, Mich
    Posts
    37
    Clarke's are what I wore when I worked a small cafe in an auto plant .. GEMA.
    From the state of Michigan, near MoTown. No Unleaded coffee for me

  4. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Dana Point, CA
    Posts
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by topher View Post
    You should get cushion mats for behind the counter. It helps tremendously!!! I also swear by doc martin shoes...
    I see that most of the replies center around the shoes. Actually, ...topher hit on one of the THE MOST IMPORTANT elements in "long term standing customer service." The floor surface is the first item, and from an employee health standpoint, the most important contributor to overall body health after a shift.

    Speaking as a past owner of two manufacturing firms, our production areas, not walkways, were always "matted" with rubber cushions. And today, when doing trade shows, we always ship rubber mats that are layed down prior to our own carpeting. The difference between standing eight hours on a rubberized and carpeted floor versus concrete/hardwood, etc., is like night and day. Neighboring vendors in adjoining booths, and booth visitors, always notice the difference the minute they step on the rubber/carpet combination.

    And as for the workshoes, I used to visit professional uniform stores. But when I examined the ultra-light, high cushion soul and insert setup of the shoes there, I found that K-Mart and Walmart had similar shoes for much less. I haven't shopped for work shoes in a few years, but still own the "mock Rockport Wingtips" that I bought at K-Mart nearly ten years ago. I still use them for trade shows because they're so light.
    And I ask myself... why take blood pressure med's every morning... when they're backed up by downing two double capuccinos? I mean, I love the taste, but my heart's beat'n like a scared rabbit...!!!

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Charlotte, North Caroline
    Posts
    2
    Try cushion mat. It helps.
    Also, when you go home, try to put your feet up. It helps the blood circulation.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    428
    Years ago I had a back issue that was aggravated by a stand up job at a retail store. I found that the jell type heel custions by dr scholls worked well, and they were inexpensive. When you think about it, the heel is the part of the foot that gets the most abuse, so I think that is why the pad there worked best. At least for me.

    Len
    "I believe humans get a lot done, not because we're smart, but because we have thumbs so we can make coffee." ~Flash Rosenberg

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    238
    Even with mats on the floor I would find my feet fatigued at the end of the day.

    I would alternate between wearing Keen and Cole Haan. I made a conscious effort to rotate my shoes so I wouldn't be wearing the same pair for more then a couple of days. Other things that helped are putting in after market insoles. I used Superfeet, kind of an over the counter generic orthotic that provides excellent support. Then when I finally got a chance to sit down I would roll my foot out on a golf ball or the Goosebumps ball from the Sharperimage.

    How is your posture? Are you disciplined in squatting when getting items from the under counter fridge? Do you turn your upper torso to grab things next to your, or turn your whole body? Making adjustments to my bad habits helped relieve some of my back pain.

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    3
    As above posters have said. What works for one person may not work for another. Anyway this is what works for me.

    I buy the Shoes for crews brand you get online. For the most part they work great. Slip resistant, insoles, and different styles you can try out. The only problem I've found is I have to buy a new pair every 4 to six months. I guess since I'm on my feet for 10 to 12 hours a day that isn't bad.

    A couple things I've learned over the years that helps a ton as well.

    Stay hydrated. I try to drink at least 5-6 cups of water during work. Also loosing about 25 lbs a few months back has made all the difference in the world.

  9. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    20
    Vibram Five Finger Shoes are something worth checking out. I can easily out walk, jog, and hike in these now than I used to with traditional footwear. We evolved (or created) to be barefoot, all this extra padding is throwing off years of evolution (or decision of some supreme being). You would want to warm up to the shoes. Use them for walking around and doing typical errands before jogging or using them for long hours. Your feet will greatly increase in strength.

    Yes they are funky looking, but the two pairs that I have are one being plain black and the other being made of leather.

    vibramfivefingers.com

    Would let me hyperlink yet because of post count not being five yet, just copy and paste.

  10. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    6
    I am a barista and it is very important for me that my shoes are comfortable for work.

 

 
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