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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    May 2013
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    Port Republic, MD
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    180

    Whole bean to ground

    What proportion of your product do you ground for customers who don't have grinders? And do you a proportion in advance, or only on request?

    Thanks,
    Freeman

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2012
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    1,215
    We only grind on request and that might end up being 5% of orders placed.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2007
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    Salt Lake City
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    0%

    This question has been asked of me, and my response is in an article I wrote for Specialty Coffee Retailer.

    "Increasing whole bean sales and customer loyalty through integrity and education"
    John Piquet
    caffe d'bolla
    Salt Lake City, UT
    caffedbolla.com

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2013
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
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    Also 0%.

    I figure if they're not loving coffee to the point of grinding their own, then they're not the type of customer I'm looking for.

    A few years ago I bought 4 dozen blade grinders at $3 each, and used them as a promotion, telling potential customers that if they didn't own a grinder they could have one free after their third pound; I'd charge them $10 for the grinder on the first lb., and then refund their $10 when they bought their third lb. It met with a modicum of success, but only with those who truly wanted to deal with the extra effort of making the best possible coffee.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2012
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    1,215
    I don't want to come off as that big of a coffee snob, to be honest. I have a couple of regular customers who actually have grinders but want their beans ground at purchase. After explaining that their end product would be superior if ground just before brewing and having them tell me that it was more important to them to have the beans ground by me, I happily complied/comply with a cheerful smile on my face.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2011
    Location
    Thomaston, CT
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    389
    I have a few of these customers too. Like Peter stated, no extra effort, maybe time is the factor too, to grind themselves.
    But I do appreciate their business though. So, I will keep my grinders around.
    We'll Keep trying to educate, grind then brew, immediately please!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2007
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    Salt Lake City
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    Like Schomer at Espresso Vivace has done before us, and places like Heart roasters in PDX are doing now, whole bean only means, "whole bean only". When people want to purchase an artisan quality coffee, they should understand that they will need to make a small investment in a grinder. And it does help if you don't have any bulk grinders in your shop!

    Education has no value to the customer if you don't practice what you preach. Espousing a standard of principles and then failing to hold to them when you encounter resistance calls into question those very principles. Schomer said it best (paraphrasing), "If you want to run an artisan quality coffee shop, the quality of the coffee should be the soul of what you do, and if you don't truly believe in it, customers will see right through it."

    Our customers know that we practice what we preach, which gives us a fantastically loyal customer base. This Introduction to my monthly column spells out Why I believe having a philosophy AND sticking to it is important.
    Last edited by John P; 12-25-2013 at 02:48 PM. Reason: clarity
    John Piquet
    caffe d'bolla
    Salt Lake City, UT
    caffedbolla.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2011
    Location
    Thomaston, CT
    Posts
    389
    John, thanks for your post. I agree the bar is set. Believe me, I am in reach of "whole bean only". The East coast is coming around,
    but I honestly believe it will take a little more time. The Dunkin' Donuts crowd. There has been some converts by my harping and preaching though.
    Should see the looks I get. So John, thanks for the reminder!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2007
    Location
    Salt Lake City
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    1,045
    JumpinJakJava,

    The reality is, if you feel you are even in the ballpark, you need to draw a line. Everyone has their own path, but you should dictate the path. If you lead, customers will follow.

    I wish you all the best in your continued pursuit.

    Happy Holidays!
    John Piquet
    caffe d'bolla
    Salt Lake City, UT
    caffedbolla.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    154
    Yes, Peter is right. It is good if the customer is also exerting extra effort of making the best possible coffee. Costumer who really loves coffee will find some ways to grind for themselves.

 

 
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