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  1. #1
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    Need Advice: Replacing Behmor with something bigger

    I’ve decided to replace my trusty Behmor with something bigger. Slightly bigger . The plan is to roast approximately 100 lbs. per month and possibly “go mobile” (farmer’s markets, fairs etc.). Translation: small (1 – 1.5 kg), light (no more than 250 lbs.) propane roaster. And yes, I have a budget: $4 – 5.5k.
    At this point, I seriously consider TJ-067 but I’d like ask all of you professionals for the advice and recommendation.
    Last edited by PinkRose; 11-01-2014 at 06:52 AM. Reason: Edited title for clarity

  2. #2
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    What is a TJ-067?

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Milwaukee, WI
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    I've met Steve from Mill City Roasters, and know him on a couple forums. I was hoping the OP would use the name of the roaster and not just a model number. They are Chinese, and are OK roasters. There won't be much feedback, as there aren't too many in use yet.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2014
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    Ok, beside Mill City TJ-067 I’ve also found:
    Arizona Custom 1.5 KG Commercial Coffee Roaster
    1.5 Kilo Golden GR1, Commercial Coffee Roaster
    Sonofresco 2100 Coffee Roaster
    1 Kilo commercial coffee roaster Ozturk
    Can any of you experts provide info, feedback or maybe guide me in different direction?

  6. #6
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    Not addressing the brands you're looking at, but the size... assuming a 15% loss of weight, a 1.5K will give you roughly 2.75# net at full capacity. If 100# per month is really what you're looking at, ignoring the idea of growth of sales, do you want to have to produce 36 batches to do so?

    I realize you're looking at portability, but that's the offset, is more time spent roasting.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2014
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    Peter(or anyone)- Ignoring the size, can you give some insight on the roasters?

    I am in a similar position to MJ05. I am looking to buy a 1k(ish) machine to start selling at farmers markets as I build the brand. Then open a larger scale roaster and use the 1k as a sampler of sorts. Any input on a good machine for my needs?

  8. #8
    Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by n3rdtown View Post
    Peter(or anyone)- Ignoring the size, can you give some insight on the roasters?

    I am in a similar position to MJ05. I am looking to buy a 1k(ish) machine to start selling at farmers markets as I build the brand. Then open a larger scale roaster and use the 1k as a sampler of sorts. Any input on a good machine for my needs?
    Let me just say I think roasting at the farmers market is a great idea. That said I am not sure how practical it would be. First thing you may want to do is check your local county for regulations here (I got a surprise when I wanted to roast from my garage). Second, roasting and selling at the same time would definitely be at least a 2 person job. At least for me I can't see watching the roaster carefully enough to sell and roast with precision anyhow. I would personally get very easily distracted trying to talk coffee that I would almost certainly miss a key point in the roast and screw it up.

    I'm definitely not trying to be discouraging but I would definitely think about that if you haven't already... Full disclosure I just bought a Diedrich IR1 after several months of looking and debating on size, brand, and what I felt would be right for me at this point in my learning curve. My decision came down to two companies (Diedrich & San Franciscan roasters), mainly because I wanted to buy US made and have local parts good customer service. You will find that everyone has a favorite roaster and they are very loyal to that brand, but the honest truth here is that both companies (including others in and out of the US) make a very good roaster which are more than capable of roasting exceptional award winning quality roasted coffee in the right hands. As my friend always said it's not the chariot it is the rider, but you don't want a chariot with a square wheel.
    I actually visited the SF facility. Both Bill and Matt were extremely helpful and gracious with all my questions even after I decided on the Diedrich. I would highly recommend that you check out the San Franciscan roasters. My decision came down to the size of the roaster, in fact I would have gone with a San Franciscan roaster if they had a 1k roaster. The SF1 was to small for my needs and the SF6 was a bit big for me to practice and hone my skill on. That said if I was going to sell at the farmers market regularly I would seriously consider the SF6. The SF6 would provide the volume you need for sure and it would look very cool at the farmers market especially with the optional Amish-made hickory cart. That said I don't know that I would go as large as a SF6 unless you already have the experience roasting and have access to a sample roaster.
    Last edited by Amhas; 11-20-2014 at 03:18 PM.

 

 

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