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  1. #1
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    Low Acidity Beans

    Does anyone have any suggestions for a low acidity bean to use for cold brew? I have been using a washed Colombian and Guatemalan at full city + with variations on steep time and I don't think it is the right type of coffee. I had heard a recommendation for a Sumatran mixed with some Ethiopian harrar. Any thoughts?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Seb
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    Why would you want a low acidity bean for cold brew? Cold brew will already give you much lower acidity so if you start with a low acid bean you might end up with an unbalanced flat drink. But still, to answer your question, a good Bresilian bean would normally be low in acid.

  3. #3
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    John, I would start with some quality single origin coffee before I jumped into a blend...unless you already have a few blends you want to try. Cold infused coffee is like starting over on you taste profile for the coffee bean. It is not going to have the same taste characteristics as using heat. I would start with coffee beans you like and not worry about the acid just yet. Treat it like you don't know the taste of the bean. Also, just like hot infusion methods keep a log on infusion duration until you get it narrowed down to a taste you like. I totally agree with Sebs comment. However, I also would suggest you try the Sumatran without blending it. Hope it helps...and brew on!

  4. #4
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    Thanks Thirdwave & Seb.

    I am getting a very strange, almost carbonated flavor with some of my cold brew tests (mason jar, 600 ml water, 110 g coffee). Could this be because the beans are letting off co2 and it is seeping into the brew? Should the beans be rested for a lengh of time before brewing? I am getting this even 1-2 days of rest after roasting. Idk whats going on but it is very frustrating.

    Thanks

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnD18 View Post
    Thanks Thirdwave & Seb.

    I am getting a very strange, almost carbonated flavor with some of my cold brew tests (mason jar, 600 ml water, 110 g coffee). Could this be because the beans are letting off co2 and it is seeping into the brew? Should the beans be rested for a lengh of time before brewing? I am getting this even 1-2 days of rest after roasting. Idk whats going on but it is very frustrating.

    Thanks
    What is a "carbonated flavor"? 1 - 2 days won't eliminate the CO2 off gassing but there won't be any carbonation (if there is unnoticeable). Try a lighter roast, would be my suggestion. I expect you're tasting the burnt carbonized elements of a dark roast.

  6. #6
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    Ok, I always let my coffee rest for a minum of 8 hours. The master roaster I learned from did it for 24. I dropped it down to 8 through experimentation. Almost everyone will do it a bit different, but most will allow for some rest time. No rest time coupled with no way for C02 to release could be the cause of your issue, however, you are doing it. Did you just recently start using mason jars? You are obviously resting the coffee...do you have any smells or environmental issues that the beans may pick up when you rest them? what do you use to clean your cold brew equip and mason jars? The other thought is that is this just a phase of the cold brew process? Does it pass or is it perinmate? Maybe goof with shorter or longer exposure times? It does not sound like you had a really dark roast...if so, that may infuse in. Hope it helps...sounds like your roasting procedures are ok...I would look to other areas of the process. Don't be frustrated...great things come from the experimental process...however, who doesn't want to use their cold brew

  7. #7
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    I recommend Sulawesii for a cold brew, it is as smooth as it gets, no bitterness flavors's are amazing.

    Cheers
    Rich

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafdud View Post
    I recommend Sulawesii for a cold brew, it is as smooth as it gets, no bitterness flavors's are amazing.

    Cheers
    Rich
    I agree. Also Indian Mysore is a good cold brew.

 

 

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