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  1. #11
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    The Lovely & Talented Roast Mistress's roasts are probably closer to 20 minutes. While it would be nicer to turn out more roasts in an hour . . . to what purpose? Echoing Topher again, don't you want to sleep good at night because you did the best job you could and turned out the best product you could? Maybe that way of thinking is old school but somehow I think it will win out in the end.

    As to hipster roasting that was really big here in Ireland last year. We turned away some business because we wouldn't 'blonde roast' for customers. The feeling was since our heart wouldn't be in it then there'd be no heart in the coffee. It seems the tide is starting to turn. There are still some hipster cups to be had but I'm thinking that fad is on the down slope. My friend is Ireland's biggest espresso machine dealer. His take is that 'at the end of the day I think 95% of people just want a good cup of coffee. Why let 5% of the market drive your business?'
    Wrinkles only go where the smiles have been -- Jimmy Buffett (via Mark Twain)

  2. #12
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    If these hipster roasts are coming out grassy, that means they're certainly underdeveloped. However, I have many roasts I drop on the light/light-medium side that are very balanced and don't have sourness or grassy notes. I find I can bring out very pleasant citrus, fruit and even black tea-ish notes by roasting lighter, but giving it sufficient development. I usually end up dropping them between 13 - 14 minutes. Attached is a great washed Ethiopia Gera. Light and flavorful, but definitely no sourness.

    Why Colombian roasters, roast the coffee different that roasters in the US?-img_0647.jpg
    Last edited by JohnD18; 02-15-2017 at 10:36 PM.

  3. #13
    Seb
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    This discussion about the roasting duration is interesting. I just read a very interesting paper that talk about this and the effects of duration and process of the green coffee on the quality attibute while cupping. Check this and please let me know what you think:
    http://www.resjournals.org/JAFS/PDF/...aleh_et_al.pdf

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seb View Post
    This discussion about the roasting duration is interesting. I just read a very interesting paper that talk about this and the effects of duration and process of the green coffee on the quality attibute while cupping. Check this and please let me know what you think:
    http://www.resjournals.org/JAFS/PDF/...aleh_et_al.pdf
    Interesting article, it seems to correspond with what I have observed in regards to roasting time and how it affects the different flavors. So, it seems to show that generally you have more intense flavors (for better or worse) in shorter roasts, and less so in longer roasts. I have found that even if I drop the beans at the same temperature, but stretch out the development time too long, it tastes more flat, and just like "coffee" in its more basic sense. All of the outstanding flavors go out the window. Not "baked" though.
    If I drop too early, the inherent flavors (acidic, fruit, nut, earthy, etc.) are much too strong, and if it's dropped really early, you get the grassy flavors which is essentially the bean not being developed enough on the inside. I measure the development time as a percentage of the entire roast, comprising the time after first crack to drop time. I have found certain sweet spots that seem to work well among many coffees.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by expat View Post
    The Lovely & Talented Roast Mistress's roasts are probably closer to 20 minutes. While it would be nicer to turn out more roasts in an hour . . . to what purpose? Echoing Topher again, don't you want to sleep good at night because you did the best job you could and turned out the best product you could? Maybe that way of thinking is old school but somehow I think it will win out in the end.

    As to hipster roasting that was really big here in Ireland last year. We turned away some business because we wouldn't 'blonde roast' for customers. The feeling was since our heart wouldn't be in it then there'd be no heart in the coffee. It seems the tide is starting to turn. There are still some hipster cups to be had but I'm thinking that fad is on the down slope. My friend is Ireland's biggest espresso machine dealer. His take is that 'at the end of the day I think 95% of people just want a good cup of coffee. Why let 5% of the market drive your business?'
    Are you dropping within FC?

  6. #16
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    Ireland
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    Hey Musicphan, depending on who the coffee is for we'll drop at FC, mid-roast, even right up to 2nd crack. The Colombians are very versatile and when we were first roasting, several years ago now, found them to be very forgiving for a newbie roaster. Our retail coffee would be a blend of these various roasts to give as much flavour up and down the flavour possibilities as possible. For our coffee shops we're more focused on a true single origin flavour and try to tailor that to what the shop wants, even to the individual baristas preference.

    And to JohnD, I'd love to try some of your Ethiopian Gera. We too do some light roasts -- this kinda goes against what I said earlier but since they aren't fast roasts and we develop the flavours . . . - so we do a lot of Sidamo as you described, possibly getting a couple more minutes out of the roast. Never sour, never grassy, the flavours much as you described in your post. Throw in some jasmine at the front end and caramel at the back. This is done specifically for a coffee shop in Dublin that we're proud to say regularly gets the #1 rating, among 2,000+ restaurants on TripAdvisor. They rate so high because their staff is great, they've got good fare, and we'd like to think that our coffee contributes at least a bit to their rankings.
    Wrinkles only go where the smiles have been -- Jimmy Buffett (via Mark Twain)

  7. #17
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    Thanks expat.. I've been working on extending my roasts so I was curios where in the roast cycle you were dropping if your getting those long of roasts. I was in St Louis a few week back from some importer supplied training... there were roasting 7-8 minutes roast on a Loring. I know they obviously roast differently with the hot air recirculation but that was super short IMO.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by expat View Post
    Hey Musicphan, depending on who the coffee is for we'll drop at FC, mid-roast, even right up to 2nd crack. The Colombians are very versatile and when we were first roasting, several years ago now, found them to be very forgiving for a newbie roaster. Our retail coffee would be a blend of these various roasts to give as much flavour up and down the flavour possibilities as possible. For our coffee shops we're more focused on a true single origin flavour and try to tailor that to what the shop wants, even to the individual baristas preference.

    And to JohnD, I'd love to try some of your Ethiopian Gera. We too do some light roasts -- this kinda goes against what I said earlier but since they aren't fast roasts and we develop the flavours . . . - so we do a lot of Sidamo as you described, possibly getting a couple more minutes out of the roast. Never sour, never grassy, the flavours much as you described in your post. Throw in some jasmine at the front end and caramel at the back. This is done specifically for a coffee shop in Dublin that we're proud to say regularly gets the #1 rating, among 2,000+ restaurants on TripAdvisor. They rate so high because their staff is great, they've got good fare, and we'd like to think that our coffee contributes at least a bit to their rankings.
    Is the Sidamo you talk about a natural? I have a natural Sidamo I roast and it has similar flavor characteristics.

 

 
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