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  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Hollywood Fl
    Posts
    382
    After roasting on a lot of machines and owned many of them including Ambex, Ambex knock off, Probat and others I installed a Loring in the new building, I will not buy anything else now. these roasters have unbelievable control, built well, awesome customer support and roast more evenly than any other roaster I have used. The new controls released this year rock solid and easy to use with lots of information. Plus being super fuel efficient and environmentally friendly really helps.

    What ever you buy it is a really good idea to make sure it has UL or CE certifications. If you are going to get building permits you will need something the building and fire department are going to accept.

    Loring is a hybrid between fluid and drum roaster. Toper is correct most air roasters have a hard time with coffee development as they generally roast by air temp rather than bean temp. Loring roast by bean temp. There are a lot of new roaster technology coming the last few years. Some really cool new methods that are not proven but good ideas. Make sure you roast on it before you purchase.
    Great coffee does not just happen!
    South Florida Artisan Coffee Roaster

  2. #12
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Boca Raton
    Posts
    3,379
    Congrats on your new equipment. Hope all is well and wish you the best.
    "Wine is for aging, not coffee."
    Ken Hutchinson, Starsky and Hutch

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by topher View Post
    you can get an even roast. This is just my opinion but I feel that coffee roasted on these are lacking in body. I am basing this off personal taste experience.
    I've heard the rhetoric about fluid bed roasting and "lack of body", but it's just that...rhetoric. Tasting one or two air roasted coffees, and using one extensively, are two very different things. Body comes mostly from the coffee and how it's roasted, not the roaster itself.

    If the argument is made that it comes from the roaster itself, then where exactly does this "body" originate and how does it make its way into my cup? Is it from the smoke within the drum "infusing" the beans? Is it from the coffee resin that coats the drum "seasoning" them? For me, if it is either one of those, I would prefer not to have it in my cup. Is it from ferrite molecules somehow migrating from the drum? Maybe. But that's way above my pay grade.

    I've purchased the same coffees, both roasted and green, from the likes of Klatch and others to compare my roasts to theirs, and do not see any inherent difference in "body". I have a nice Kenya in house now that has all the syrupy body you could want at a very light roast. I also have a nice Ethiopia natural who's outer fruits would singe in a drum roaster.

    In the end, a roaster is just a cooking tool. It's a way of transferring heat to a coffee seed, that's it. You have to learn how to use it to get what you want.
    Last edited by almico; 08-16-2017 at 06:23 AM.

  4. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by slurp View Post
    most air roasters have a hard time with coffee development as they generally roast by air temp rather than bean temp. Loring roast by bean temp.
    First, congratulations on your new roaster. I would love to try a Loring. It's far more an air roaster than drum, since the drum is not directly heated. It uses a rotating drum to circulate the beans instead of a column of air, but there is very little heat conduction from the drum going on. It likely keeps the drum very clean. It really is a very clever system. Regardless, it's unlikely the OP is going to invest $80K in his first roaster.

    But your statement about coffee development is over generalized at best, and at worst, simply not true.

    That's the great thing about the internet, people can say anything they want, without backing it up, and other people then repeat it ad infinitum until it becomes true by virtue of repetition.

    From my experience, air roasters have the luxury of being able to place the bean temp probe directly into the bean mass since nothing is spinning. At least it is on mine. Where is the bean probe located in the Loring?

    Here's a vid of my roast chamber. The probe is inserted through a hole towards the bottom and is insulated from the roast chamber. The tip is buried in the bean mass at the sides and does not touch the center column of air, so I get a pretty accurate bean temp reading. If the probe is exposed to the incoming hot air, you get a mixed reading of bean temp and air temp. Likewise, if a probe is connected to a drum, you likely do not get a true bean temp reading.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IW5w3Xf8Ihg
    Last edited by almico; 08-16-2017 at 10:14 AM.

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    10
    Do you mean that Loring is way better than Probat and similar brands. I'm really new in this world, and have been researching for a roaster machine to use for my coffee shop but not for wholesale.

    Do you recommend a specific one or at least can you narrow my choices, you seem very experienced in this field

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    959
    Quote Originally Posted by Meshaal View Post
    Do you mean that Loring is way better than Probat and similar brands. I'm really new in this world, and have been researching for a roaster machine to use for my coffee shop but not for wholesale.

    Do you recommend a specific one or at least can you narrow my choices, you seem very experienced in this field
    IMO... yes I would pick a Loring's over anything on the market... the best is subjective of course. The Loring is super flexible in controlling temp/airflow/etc... super easy controls, read-out. I was pretty impressed with unit we roasted on... however they are SUPER spendy.

  7. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by Meshaal View Post
    Do you mean that Loring is way better than Probat and similar brands. I'm really new in this world, and have been researching for a roaster machine to use for my coffee shop but not for wholesale.

    Do you recommend a specific one or at least can you narrow my choices, you seem very experienced in this field
    I'm in the same position. I began roasting a few years ago thinking how great it would be to sell coffee to local coffee shops and restaurants. I started selling at farmers markets and was quickly convinced to sell coffee drinks as well as beans. I found that I really enjoy the people contacts and connections and, as much as I enjoy roasting, I could not see myself standing in front of a roaster all day. So as soon as the build out is complete in about a month, I will be fronting my own coffee bar, selling my own coffee. I think this is the business model of the future.

    As much as I would love a Loring, the smallest is 15kg and costs a small fortune. Price aside, that's just too much coffee for me. I would think a 5-12# roaster should do for a single locale coffee shop. It depends on how many coffee varieties you want to offer. If you have only 2-3 coffees to roast, then a 12#er would be better. If you have to keep 10-12 single origin and blends on hand, then you will be roasting smaller batches.

    I would think the Artisan 6 fluid bed roaster would be sufficient and if I were buying a drum, it would be hard to pass up the San Franciscan 6.

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by almico View Post
    I'm in the same position. I began roasting a few years ago thinking how great it would be to sell coffee to local coffee shops and restaurants. I started selling at farmers markets and was quickly convinced to sell coffee drinks as well as beans. I found that I really enjoy the people contacts and connections and, as much as I enjoy roasting, I could not see myself standing in front of a roaster all day. So as soon as the build out is complete in about a month, I will be fronting my own coffee bar, selling my own coffee. I think this is the business model of the future.

    As much as I would love a Loring, the smallest is 15kg and costs a small fortune. Price aside, that's just too much coffee for me. I would think a 5-12# roaster should do for a single locale coffee shop. It depends on how many coffee varieties you want to offer. If you have only 2-3 coffees to roast, then a 12#er would be better. If you have to keep 10-12 single origin and blends on hand, then you will be roasting smaller batches.

    I would think the Artisan 6 fluid bed roaster would be sufficient and if I were buying a drum, it would be hard to pass up the San Franciscan 6.
    Exactly, 15 kg is definitely a lot for me. It would be only for my own coffee shop usage. If in my country there were competitive roasters I might not have thought of roasting. However, there are very little if not at all.

    Right now, for some reason, I'm leaning towards the Probat. I thing the Probatone 5 perfectly covers my needs. I'm thinking about Turkish machines as well like for example, Toper just because I'm in the Middle East and it wouldn't be very far from my home.

    As for the coffee I will provide, this would require a lot of research, I currently have no idea whatssoever about where I will get the green beans and the types I shall provide.

  9. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    1
    First timer. Would like to entertain comments on what your thoughts are about the Gene Cafe CBC-1200, or the Hottop KN B or P. Roasting is a hobby, however, I'm starting to get some interest from friends wanting to purchase what I roast. Thank you

    Added information, the Hottop is, KN8828B-2-K+ and also the Behmor 1600+. Any comments or suggestion much appreciated, thank you.
    Last edited by Makaha; 08-18-2017 at 11:18 PM.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    959
    Quote Originally Posted by Makaha View Post
    First timer. Would like to entertain comments on what your thoughts are about the Gene Cafe CBC-1200, or the Hottop KN B or P. Roasting is a hobby, however, I'm starting to get some interest from friends wanting to purchase what I roast. Thank you
    Please start a new thread...

 

 
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