Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Posts
    1

    Thoughts on Fluid Bed Roasting? Pros and Cons?

    Any key insights on Fluid Bed roasters are greatly appreciated. Also, if someone knows about a well known brand that manufactures these types of roasters.

  2. #2
    Seb
    Seb is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Quebec/Canada
    Posts
    136
    You can find some links to manufacturers here:
    Resources - Air-Roasted Coffee

    To this list, you should add Coffee Crafters that now produce a 3lbs and 9lbs model (now known as a 10lbs model):
    https://www.coffeecrafters.com/

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    819
    I think you will find most pro roasters lean towards drum roasters vs. air roasters. Many feel that air roasting creates a bright tasting cup. The big difference is air roasters only roast with air/convection where a drum roaster roast by convection and conductive (head directly on bean via metal drum). The apex is the Loring roasters... but you start at $50K

  4. #4
    Seb
    Seb is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Quebec/Canada
    Posts
    136
    Funny because Loring is technically an air roaster! As describe on their website:

    "The heat transfer properties of a Loring roaster’s stainless steel roast chamber, combined with convection heating process and responsive thermocouples, allows you to precisely control your bean temps, as well as make quick changes to the heat inside the roast chamber."

    I roast commercially on a fluid bed coffee roaster and i was roasting before on a drum roaster. I do not agree with the above comments. The main problem of fluid bed reputation is more related to the cheap unit available on the market. But there are very good models that have won multiples award for their roasts. And Loring is an air roaster, they use a drum but the drum do not turn, they use mixing paddle with hot air instead of a standard burner below the drum. Also, there is conduction from bean to bean in a fluid bed roaster and from the hopper, much less of course then the hot surface of a drum but it is not 100% convection. I am just starting to build my own fluid bed roaster, trying to build a much higher end unit than what is available in the market now and with automation. It will be 100% electric and my goal is to build a 15kg. If i had to buy a new fluid bed, i'd personnaly wait to see what USRC will produce. I think we will see in the future more and more fluid bed roaster of higher quality and larger size which should bring more pros to use them and this will certainly help to change their actual bad perception.

    A good read on the subject and they also show a Loring as an exemple of a top of the line air roaster:
    https://coffeetechniciansguild.org/b...ath-less-taken
    Last edited by Seb; 01-29-2019 at 06:10 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    819
    Quote Originally Posted by Seb View Post
    I do not agree with the above comments.
    Just curious what you don't agree with? I pretty much-stated facts... Regarding 'quality/flavor' most air roasted coffee is roasted at a faster pace. When you roast faster you highlight acidity. The fact I stated Loring is the apex in roasters should tell you I'm not against air roasters... You also have to understand the Loring is not a standard fluid bed roaster - its a bit of a hybrid air roaster with a drum.

  6. #6
    Seb
    Seb is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Quebec/Canada
    Posts
    136
    Sorry, i should have done a quote. I was refering to the "convection only" of an air roaster. Of course a drum roaster is mostly conduction but an air roaster is probably 70-80% convection for 20-30% conduction from beans to beans and from the hopper wall that is very hot. Also i was understanding your post like drum roasters was better and that was the reason why pro roasters lean toward that type but you mention Loring as a reference and for me Loring is much closer to an air roaster than a conventionnal drum roaster as it use and indirect flame, hot air arrive to the beans that are tumbling in a non rotational drum. But maybe hybrid is the right term.

    I think that it is possible to make great tasting coffee from both type but you do need to have a lot of controls on the roast and this is what many low end unit are lacking.

 

 

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Commercial Lever machine La Pavoni Bar T 2L/3L - Pros & Cons
    By KLcoffeeaddict in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-10-2015, 04:32 AM
  2. location - pros/cons of being part of an exisiting condo?
    By KookyforCoffee in forum Coffee Industry Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-30-2007, 11:51 AM
  3. Pros & Cons of Robusta and . Arabia?
    By JJHippo in forum Coffee Beans & Espresso Beans
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-28-2006, 04:00 PM
  4. Leasing Equipment Pros N Cons
    By Rodsboots in forum Coffee Industry Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-07-2006, 08:49 PM
  5. pros and cons of hiring a Coffee Consultant
    By hatfield2 in forum Coffee Industry Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-28-2004, 02:34 PM

Tags for this Thread