Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    5

    Extraction Time Question

    Hi all,

    I have learned that the American extraction time for one espresso is about 15-20 seconds but the Italian type is about 25-30 seconds to make. What makes them different? Why is that?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    41

    Re: Extraction Time Question

    Quote Originally Posted by coffeetalk
    Hi all,

    I have learned that the American extraction time for one espresso is about 15-20 seconds but the Italian type is about 25-30 seconds to make. What makes them different? Why is that?

    Thank you.
    The Specialty Coffee Association of America and most American authors that I've read, not to mention my own experience, recommend 23-27 seconds. This is for a double shot. In my experience you can't get a good shot pulling a single.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Elmira OR
    Posts
    30
    18 to 30 seconds for a single shot should give you a good range for a perfect shot , not only the grind, how warm is the machine and how warm is the cup (if is ceramic)and of course the pressure from the water pump
    but keep in mind that also the blend of coffee has a LOT to do with the final result, some blend are not made for espresso period.
    Yes you can make a perfect single shot of espresso

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle,Washington USA
    Posts
    874
    First let me ask you a couple of questions??? #1--How wet is water? And #2--How high is up???

    Yes, I know those questions some crazy...But you have a number of different opinions as to what the perfect shot is, and how to produce one. I'd like to ask who has the answer to the perfect shot and then tell me why your way is best? Some say 16 to 22 seconds, some say 18 to 30 seconds. I say whatever tastes the best. It really depends alot on your application. Meaning, are you in a controlled enviroment like a cafe or coffee shop and using ceramic cups, in an espresso cart using paper cups, or in a drive thru using paper cups? Because shot times will differ. Most importantly your blends will determine the taste along with the temperture of your water, the grind of the beans, and the tamp in the port-a-filter. Keep in mind one application may not work in all cases. So this one size fits all does not work. Anyone in the art of making great espresso drinks should always be looking for ways to improve, not just necessarily staying with one way. Other wise how can you make the claim that you are an expert. As for me I'm always looking for ways to improve my art. Rather is comes from me experimenting or one of my customers showing me another way.

    Just my two cents
    "A Word of Difference"TM

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee Guy
    First let me ask you a couple of questions??? #1--How wet is water? And #2--How high is up???

    Yes, I know those questions some crazy...But you have a number of different opinions as to what the perfect shot is, and how to produce one. I'd like to ask who has the answer to the perfect shot and then tell me why your way is best? Some say 16 to 22 seconds, some say 18 to 30 seconds. I say whatever tastes the best. It really depends alot on your application. Meaning, are you in a controlled enviroment like a cafe or coffee shop and using ceramic cups, in an espresso cart using paper cups, or in a drive thru using paper cups? Because shot times will differ. Most importantly your blends will determine the taste along with the temperture of your water, the grind of the beans, and the tamp in the port-a-filter. Keep in mind one application may not work in all cases. So this one size fits all does not work. Anyone in the art of making great espresso drinks should always be looking for ways to improve, not just necessarily staying with one way. Other wise how can you make the claim that you are an expert. As for me I'm always looking for ways to improve my art. Rather is comes from me experimenting or one of my customers showing me another way.

    Just my two cents
    First of all, I never said I'm an expert, or at least no more that nayone else in this forum. Just expressing my opinions, based on experience and research. Also, aren't you being just a little self-righteous? You're assuming that I only use one way to pull an espresso. The simple fact is that while espresso is an art, there are also elements of science to it. Each of the variables you've mentioned can be controlled to some degree in order to compensate for each other so that you can be consistent. Time is one of those easily controlled variables. It is also one that produces the most predictable results. The longer an extraction the more coffee solids you will have in the end cup. More is not always better, as this can produce an overly bitter cup. Conversely, the shorter the extraction is the less coffee solids there will be, and you will end up with a more sour cup. As you say, this all comes down to personal taste. A good barista will know his customer and know how they like their espresso. A great barista will actually be able to produce that espresso on a consistent basis. So I say, in the end it's not our opinions as coffee professionals that matter, but those of our customers.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Seattle,Washington USA
    Posts
    874
    O.K. let me step off my high horse ...My intention was not to slam you for being an expert. Like you I'm voicing my opinion as well. But it's always fun to get the discussion going. This way we can get the thoughts brewin'. Hope I didn't ruffle your feathers too bad In any case you're right in the end it's the customer that counts.
    "A Word of Difference"TM

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    41

    Coffee Extraction

    No harm, no foul I agree, an open exchange of idesa is what this is all about, right? Hey, coffeetalk! You seem to have disappeared! I'm curious as to where you got your information regarding the length of extraction of American vs. Italian espresso.

 

 

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. espresso extraction time!
    By coffeejoes in forum Coffee Industry Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-18-2009, 01:51 PM
  2. Indutrial espresso extraction
    By espressodfigueroa in forum Coffee and Espresso Machines
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-02-2009, 10:05 PM
  3. Extraction time for double shot?
    By ron45 in forum Coffee Beans & Espresso Beans
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-03-2005, 10:54 AM
  4. Part Time or Full Time (and other questions)
    By HVCoffee in forum Coffee Shops, Espresso Bars & Cafes
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-16-2005, 10:47 PM
  5. Extraction Time Question
    By coffeetalk in forum Coffee Beans & Espresso Beans
    Replies: 83
    Last Post: 03-01-2005, 10:15 AM

Search tags for this page

15 bar vs 10 bar for espressor extraction

,
15bar espresso extraction time
,

coffee extraction time

,
espresso 25 vs 30 seconds
,
espresso extraction time
,
espresso extraction time 15 bar
,
espresso shot extraction time
,
extraction time coffee
,
extraction time on coffee
,
extraction time single shot
Click on a term to search for related topics.