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  1. #11
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    Ha! That's half of the roads that could be built from the coffee grounds I toss out on a yearly basis...just sayin'....

  2. #12
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    The Ethiopian coffee culture always fascinated me for a long time. I was and am keep telling myself that I must visit this coffee origin country one of these days, specially since Jeff Bobcock from Zoka told me about his last trip to Ethiopia with 8 other roasters.

    It is not about the Ethiopia coffees themselves, but the spiritual ceremony around coffee rituals. That really interests me more than anything else.

    I have read that in Ethiopia, coffee is assigned a ceremonial role and its consumption as part of a ritual meal that is thought to bring blessings through invocations and prayers. They believe that it has spiritual powers to safeguard the household and use of coffee as a symbol of penance for offenses committed, and also use coffee in various capacities to rid afflicted persons of unwanted spirits or to stimulate recitations and prayers.

    Coffee preparation is usually done by A WOMAN (photo below) with a charcoal brazier, slowly turning coffee beans on a open pan. The woman often makes her round with roasted coffee in the pan, the better to give her guests a closer whiff of the beans, before she manually ground with pestle and mortar. The coffee is brewed with water in a clay (Jabana) and served in small cups WITHOUT HANDLES. The coffee can be drunk with or without milk, sugar, and in some regions, northeaster & southeastern, in Ethiopia, they will eat fresh coffee beans with salt or with spices and even fried them in butter. Coffee leaves and husks are also prepared for drink.
    Traditionally, coffee is boiled 3 times and guests are expected to drink a min of a cup of each session.

    Interesting facts about coffee around the world-8158401015_1e39eedf85_o.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-alemabate.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-ethiopian-coffee-1-360x240.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-img_6601.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-queen-sheba-ethiopian.jpg

  3. #13
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    Since most of our members are in USA, here is some coffee history for Saturday afternoon.

    it is known that in 1607, Captain John Smith (I guess it is one of the most common names in USA, right? :+) founded the Jamestown colony in Virginia (I wonder why he did not name it "Smithtown" instead....). Even though many historians disagree, that some believes that John Smith introduced coffee to North America. (for me, I would not know, I was not there...).

    Anyway, by mid 1600, coffee was the drink of choice of the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam (Not the New Amsterdam city in Guyana ,(it is a country right above Brazil), but the southern tip of Manhattan Island was called with this name), but when the British took over, it was renamed to New York in 1664. At that time, the coffee was continued to be popular, next to tea, but a lot of people could not afford to drink it because the cost was about 12 cents per cup. (THAT IS ABOUT $12 TO $15 IN CURRENT MONEY).

    By 1668, coffee had become the favorite breakfast drink of New York. While you might be thinking that it replaced tea, you'd be wrong. It replaced beer (kind of wonder how much a mug of beer cost...at that time).

    In 1670, Dorothy Jones of Boston, Massachusetts was granted a license to sell coffee, and so became the first American coffee trader (FYI, Just few years back, I became the first registered & export licensed KOREAN/AMERICAN coffee trader in Guatemala :+) Well.. there are few other Korean traders, but they are just traders without properly licensed by Anacafe nor has export license)

    A few years later, the first American coffee house opened in St. Mary's City, Maryland.

    When the Boston Tea Party took place in 1773, it became the patriotic duty of Americans to drink coffee.

    In fact, The Boston Tea Party was planned in a coffee house, called Green Dragon, (I did not know this!!! By the way, Green Dragon?? it sounds like a Chinese restaurant!)
    Last edited by ensoluna; 05-21-2016 at 01:31 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    I wonder why he did not name it "Smithtown" instead....
    King James of England was for whom the first British colony in the new world was named. I don't think it won the popular vote, but it did win the only vote that mattered.

    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    (FYI, Just few years back, I became the first registered & export licensed KOREAN/AMERICAN coffee trader in Guatemala :+) Well.. there are few other Korean traders, but they are just traders without properly licensed by Anacafe nor has export license)
    That's an interesting bit of notoriety. Maybe some day it will be a question on Jeopardy!

    Peaberry

  5. #15
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    Today is Kona day. Why? Mike Stasiak (aka WatVentu forum member name) emailed me how he is doing in Kona Island, working as an assistant Roaster for HULA DADDY KONA COFFEE. Mike is a special and great guy because when I joined this forum about 3 years ago, he followed me to Guatemala to see the actual coffee origin and learn something great about coffee. So, I took him there for two weeks, working in our company, roasting, cupping, checking beans, packing...etc. Then, finally about a month ago, he got a job in Kona Island and been there for exactly a month. (Yup! it took him more than two years to get the job he wanted. But HE DID IT! :+)

    Below is the photos from Mike. He is on facebook, so check it out. He has been looking for a roasting job for past two years, so I am very happy for him.

    As we all know, the most traditional Hawaiian coffee is known as Kona coffee.
    Kona is a growing district located on the southwest side of the Big Island. Kona coffee originates from a local strain of typica called Guatemala. (I wonder why they call it GUATEMALA.... Perhaps they got the original beans from Guatemala? Maybe so...)


    Kona coffee is cultivated on clusters of tiny farms located on the lower slopes of Mount Hualalai and Mauna Loa.
    By the way, Hula Daddy where Mike works located in : 74-4944 Mamalahoa Hwy, Holualoa, Hi. (By the way, you do not know where this island is, IT IS THE BIGGEST HAWAII ISLAND). Just check it out from Google map. it is interesting.

    Kona coffee is grown at altitudes of 800 to 2500 feet, which generally results in a low-acidic coffee. Due to the volcanic ash in the area, Kona coffee has acidic levels of coffee grown at a much higher altitude. (FYI, the coffee can grow well with good Arabica charateristic in this low Altitude because this Island is located in the highest north latitude in COFFEE BELT, so the weather is as cold as 5000 feet in Guatemala)


    There are five primary grades of Kona coffee: Extra Fancy, Fancy, Number 1, Peaberry (aka. DougBerrry, Just kidding for someone who does not get the joke), and Prime. The Extra Fancy bean is the largest and has the fewest defects. It's followed by Fancy, Number 1, and Prime.


    Peaberry is an extremely rare and unique coffee bean (just like Mr.DougBerry in our forum). Whereas most coffee cherries produce two coffee beans, which are flat on one side and curved on the other, the Peaberry bean is rounded and oblong and only one is found in each coffee cherry.


    BTW, Kona is not the only island that cultivates coffee in Hawaii. Other islands that cultivate coffee include Kauai and Molokai.
    Also, as we all know, Kona coffee is about 3 to 4 times more expensive than other great Arabica coffees from Guatemala, Colombia and even from Ethiopia. Not because the coffee is that great, but because they (Kona island coffee growers) has 5 times more expenses than other 3rd world coffee countries. Living in Hawaii is even more expensive than living in Los Angeles, so they have to raise up the pricing of their coffee to make some profits. So, unless you truly love Kona Coffee flavors (however, I do not think that many people can tell the differences), better to stick with other good Arabica coffees from the countries that I have mentioned.

    Below photos are from Hula Daddy coffee plantation. #3 photo is the hand of Mike who were cleaning out the machine on that day.

    Interesting facts about coffee around the world-13151621_10207260808733154_4674165169699902266_n.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-13151813_10207260817293368_2941965384213308091_n.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-13151925_10207287547561608_5777786034212679345_n.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-13177236_10207287489440155_930230576580640766_n.jpgInteresting facts about coffee around the world-13248571_10207313528931126_762380728233814446_o.jpg

  6. #16
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    Peru is one of those countries that I love to visit. I believe that they have the best food in entire Spanish speaking countries, except Spain. (not sure about the coffee, but food... definitely Yes!)

    I have been there many times before my coffee career began, however, I have not found great specialty coffee shops but I am certain that they have some in Lima.
    Half of my best friends are from Lima, Peru (they are Chinese and Japanese but were born in Lima and now living in L.A), so I am planning to visit the city again perhaps next year. So, if anyone knows some great specialty coffee shops in Lima, please let me know.

    As for coffee history in Peru, in the early 1990s, Peru was emerging from a period of economic and political instability that had nearly wiped out their coffee industry.
    In attempt to help Peruvian coffee farmers recover, Kraft Foods initiated a co-op coffee program. (I do not know the reason why Kraft foods stepped in to help and if anyone knows, please let me know)


    In 2004, Kraft Foods launched the Verano brand (verano means "summer" in Spanish), a 100-percent organic Peruvian coffee, in Austria. Today, they are the world's largest importer of coffee from Peru.


    One of the chief coffee growing regions in Peru is located in the Chanchamayo Valley, located about 200 miles east of Lima. This region produces about 40 percent of Peru's total coffee crop. This region's coffee has the best reputation of Peru coffees and is generally light-bodied, but flavorful and aromatic.

  7. #17
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    Alex,

    Just let me know when you go to Peru, I'll get in touch with my cousin who spent a year there as a foreign exchange student. I am certain that she has had a lifelong relationship with her host family, and could get whatever information you might want from them; however, I am recalling some recent posts from members here from Peru.

    Also, I appreciate the mentions of me in your posts. I get a kick out of the Dougberry/Dougieberry derivatives that Peter started. Hopefully, though, it won't end up being incorporated into the epitaph on my headstone when I've gone to that big coffee house in the sky.

    Cheers,

    Peaberry

  8. #18
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    The first known recording of coffee cultivation in Colombia was recorded in 1741 (published in or around 1745). The book, El Orinoco Ilustrado, y Defendido, is on Google Books and I linked the page to the specific reference for you because I love you all. It's in Spanish. Very very rough translation: “Coffee, a fruit so significant, I did the test myself. You sow it and it grew so well and the land was very appropriate giving copious amounts of this fruit."

    Linky

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    When the Boston Tea Party took place in 1773, it became the patriotic duty of Americans to drink coffee. In fact, The Boston Tea Party was planned in a coffee house, called Green Dragon, (I did not know this!!! By the way, Green Dragon?? it sounds like a Chinese restaurant!)
    I used to drink there. It's a pretty neat section of the city with a few historic pubs and not a long walk to Quincy Market/Fanueil Hall. Lots of tourists find their way in. I would go before Bruins games as it was along my walk from free parking to the rink.

  10. #20
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    [QUOTE=ensoluna;88273]The Ethiopian coffee culture always fascinated me for a long time. I was and am keep telling myself that I must visit this coffee origin country one of these days, specially since Jeff Bobcock from Zoka told me about his last trip to Ethiopia with 8 other roasters.

    I will be more than happy to make your visit to Ethiopia easier, and have you visit coffee farm in Jimma, Keffa, the birth place of coffee.

 

 
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