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Thread: Did you know?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    Did you know there is a coffee varietal that one coffee cherry has up to 8 coffee seeds? this varietal is called "Poly". In entire Guatemala (which has 25,000 coffee farms), there is only one farm in Acatenango who plants and raises this varietal. Attachment 6655Attachment 6656Attachment 6657
    That is interesting, how is the coffee from them? And, where can one get some?

  2. #12
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    ha ha ha. the poly varietal is only for the "show" for visiting customers for this farm. Poly is one of coffee varietals, but it is not being sold because scarcity (there are only less than 20 trees in entire Guatemala) and due to very un-even sizes, impossible to sort and roast. (even I have never tasted it)

    In Acatenango, Guatemala, there is a farm called, Finca Santa Felisa which our company represents for extremely rare micro lots and this farm has "coffee museum" where they grow very rare varietals from different parts of the world, but these are for their coffee museum for their customers, not for sales.

    This farm is one of top three best farms in American continent. Finca Esmeralda in Panama. Finca Injerto in Huehuetenango, Guatemala & Finca Santa Felisa in Acatenango, Guatemala.

    these 3 farms sell their best micro lot coffees via international auctions. You can find their auctioned coffee in below links.

    The Specialty Coffee Auctions - Hosted by Stoneworks.com

    Santa Felisa 2014 Coffee Auction - Stoneworks.com - Specialty Coffee
    Last edited by ensoluna; 01-30-2017 at 10:02 PM.

  3. #13
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    did you know that Catimor (hybrid between Caturra & Timor) coffee varietal leaves are way bigger than other varietals, such as Bourbon?

    Did you know?-bourbon-vs-catimor.jpgDid you know?-catimor.jpg

  4. #14
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    Did you know how big these coffee bean drying machines are?
    they are huge. However, unless weather is really bad, they rather not use it because it cost a lot of money to run these machines. They rather dry the beans on their patio.
    Also, you can not just put the wet beans (after wet processing) into these machines because the beans will stick to inside of the machine and burn.
    so, you have to dry the beans maybe for few days first, then, put the beans into machine to reach 10 to 11% moisture level.


    Did you know?-win_.jpgDid you know?-win_201.jpg
    Last edited by ensoluna; 01-31-2017 at 01:02 PM.

  5. #15
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    Did you know that coffee rust disease is one of the biggest problem for coffee farms?
    below are the actual photos that I took in one of Huehuetenango farm. (Coffee rust disease is called "roya" in spanish)

    Did you know?-ro.jpgDid you know?-roya.jpgDid you know?-roya1.jpg

  6. #16
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    Many coffee farm workers buy undesirable & defective coffee cherries from the farms they work for.
    they process it by themselves and dry the parchments on their patios as you can see from the photos.
    Some, they consume themselves, but mostly they try to sell them to tourists or local vendors.

    PS: I took these photos on the way to some of our farms in Huehuetenango. there is only one major road into coffee farm regions. And when coffee harvest season comes around, you can see the coffee drying right next to main roads.

    Did you know?-win_20141209_102215.jpgDid you know?-win_20141209_102249.jpg

  7. #17
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    Did you know about Kona Kai coffee scandal? and where Kona Blend with 10% real Kona coffee came out from?

    Michael Norton (owner of Kona Kai Coffee) bought 3.6 million pounds of cheaper, low grade Central & South American coffee from 1993 to 1996 and sold them as "Pure Kona Coffee" and netted $15 million dollars. Of course, he got caught and served 30 months in prison and paid $1 million in fines..etc.

    Hawaii Coffee Company (a huge coffee company and still in business, doing quite well) also got caught by selling "Kona Blend" coffee without declaring how much % is the real Kona Coffee. There were rumours that this company was putting "just few Kona coffee beans" into their coffee bags and selling them as Kona Blend.

    Since then, I believe from 1999, "Kona Blend" must have min of 10% real Kona beans and must say it on the bag.
    HOWEVER, still there is no regulation and standard for the other 90%. Currently, these "Kona Blends" are using lower grade Brazil Arabica to make their Kona Blend Coffees.

  8. #18
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    Did you know that caffeine from Aeropress is similar level as drip coffee, however, Aeropress has one fifth the acid level of drip and ONE NINTH the acid level of French Press.
    I guess that is why many people say that Aeropress is easier on your stomach and smoother than French Press.

    PS: by the way, about acidity matter, that is what Aeropress "claims"! I am not so sure it is proven scientifically, perhaps it has. However, when I compare same coffee made from Aero vs French, I can tell Aero is smoother and less acidity, but ONE Ninth of French Press? that I can not really tell by just tasting....
    Last edited by ensoluna; 02-03-2017 at 02:37 PM.

  9. #19
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    I too enjoy your posts.

    About the organic thing, i ran across a roaster who started doing his own thing in Mexico because of the organic certification of coffees that may or may not have been

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    PS: by the way, about acidity matter, that is what Aeropress "claims"! I am not so sure it is proven scientifically, perhaps it has. However, when I compare same coffee made from Aero vs French, I can tell Aero is smoother and less acidity, but ONE Ninth of French Press? that I can not really tell by just tasting....
    I have also found that my Aeropress give a sweeter cup compare to my Hario V60 or my Espro Press. Maybe half of the acidity of a french press, not one ninth IMHO. And even there, it make no sense to me if we are refering to the TA (Titratable acidity). I should do a test and analyse the pH and TA at the winery where i work. But for sure it is less acidic. However we have to keep in mind that depending on the grind size, inverted or regular method and contact time it could greatly affect the result. For example, the way the Aeropress has been planned to work is in regular position with a shorter contact time then a typical french press. If you use the Aeropress with longer contact time inverted it might be different. I don't use it often enough to confirm. I almost only use the espresso machine with some rare V60 sessions and i use the Espro Press and Aeropress only during trip.

 

 
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