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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2017
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    Nebraska
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    30 seconds off boil

    I've been seeing this in directions for making coffee for a while now and have to say there is no way 212 degree water is going to cool down to 200 degrees in 30 seconds I don't care how thin you kettle is (well maybe in Alaska). I only say this because it happened to me a while back with my gooseneck kettle. I was called away while I was in the middle of a Chemex brew to help the wife, when I got back the kettle was just starting to make noise and looking at the thermometer it was close to 210 so I turned the heat off and waited thinking this shouldn't take long, and waited and waited. I didn't time it but just guessing I would say it took 4 or 5 minutes or more to get to 200. So for you guys/gals out there heating water with out a thermometer you may be using to hot of water if you are using this method.

    I was researching cowboy coffee when I decided to post this, thanks Alex.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Jan 2017
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    Nebraska
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    Ok so after a little further reading it appears some think it's ok to add the water to the grounds over 205 degrees that it quickly cools down not to harm the coffee but other places say it burns it. I really don't purposely want to experiment with this as I don't like wasting beans but may have to unless someone else has noticed that using to hot of water does indeed give the coffee a bad taste.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator
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    Feb 2008
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    Philadelphia, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duffyjr View Post
    Ok so after a little further reading it appears some think it's ok to add the water to the grounds over 205 degrees that it quickly cools down not to harm the coffee but other places say it burns it. I really don't purposely want to experiment with this as I don't like wasting beans but may have to unless someone else has noticed that using to hot of water does indeed give the coffee a bad taste.
    Once upon a time, I read that if you pour the water from high up with the goose neck kettle, by the time the water hits the ground coffee beans, the temperature drops considerably. The spout of the kettle is narrow, and it gives you a good chance to aim right, without splashing hot water all over the place. I don't know how true it is, but it may make you feel better about the hot water hitting the ground coffee.

 

 

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