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  1. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Cucamonga
    Posts
    35
    Thanks Alex and Joe!

    That's a good question about inputs and data. I'm at the point where I can always get a good result without having to pay a whole lot of attention, and my weekly coffee roasting is a relaxing time for me to hang out in the back yard with the dog and enjoy all the sights and smells of the developing roasts. I really love catching a whiff of the coffee in the early stages when it is yellowing and a lot of steam is coming off! Sometimes in the first few minutes of a roast I'll wander around the yard taking care of small things and the smell will surprise me as it drifted across the yard. Then I get back to check the roast- it has been less than 5 minutes, my thermometer has gotten close to 300 F, and the beans are moving faster than at first because they lost so much water weight. I turn down the air so they'll continue to rise gradually in temperature and once the temperature is up to 350 I stay really close, listening for cracks, watching the thermometer, stirring and pulling out beans for visual inspection with my long, skinny wooden spoon.

    But I know I can get better and more consistent roasts if they are monitored more carefully and notes about the roasting profiles and subsequent tasting impressions are kept. I'm thinking I might ease into this a low tech way by making a graph form where I can record the time and temperature and other variables of each roast, as well as some notes about the brewing and tasting. Then I could keep a notebook of my graphed profiles, and study them.

    I had a set of cheap clamp-on lenses for my cheap LG smartphone I got on a lark at the 99 cent store. I was surprised the macro one actually could give a good result. I will look for them- they are probably around here somewhere still- or get new ones (maybe better?) from Amazon.

    Those Sumatran beans remind of the Sumatra Tano Batak I got from HappyMug the other day, and am looking forward to trying this morning. About 60 hours post-roast by then.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    165
    No need to complicate your current setup if you are consistently extremely happy with the results imho. I asked because I see how crafty you are my guess would be to assume you would love to tinker with actual inputs and log differene etc.

    How are you enjoying your Tano Batak?

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Cucamonga
    Posts
    35
    It's very interesting and enjoyable stuff. I had another cup after dinner last night that I liked even more than the first one.

    I selected it because HappyMug's description says it is the fruitiest, most complex, sweetest wet-hulled coffee he's had at a medium roast. I roasted to city+ and can't disagree. The first thing I noticed was the great balance of the tanginess with sweetness and and an amazing, almost syrupy mouth feel. The after-taste is pronounced and refreshing. The flavor is fruity, but not like some natural Ethiopians where it can be cloying if things don't go the right way.

    I've tried a couple of cups blended 50-50 with Africa coffees as well. Both were really tasty, though not necessarily greater than the sum of the parts. I liked the one I did with a washed Ethiopian better than the one I did with a honey-process Burundi.

 

 
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