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Bought my first Espresso machine, coffee grinder and accessories, I’m a newbie

Kacordy

New member
Aug 1, 2022
2
2
California
I decided to dive head first into the espresso world for a new hobby In retirement. My only background in making coffee is with a Keurig. I was very fortunate to discover and make contact with the great folks over at Whole Latte Love.
I decided on the ECM Synchronika with flow control, a Ceado E37S, a Acaia Lunar 2021 scale, and all the ECM accessories. I ordered everything. Now the big journey begins. I’m thankful I discovered this forum. I bet it’s going to be a great resource to learn from others the art of making great coffee. Thanks, Allen
 
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Kacordy

New member
Aug 1, 2022
2
2
California
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Welcome... don't skimp now... buy freshly roasted speciality coffee for that nice espresso setup :)
I’ve just started my research. I did not realize this industry is so large. I’m still trying to dial in a 18g shot in 27-30 seconds and a 30-33 finished shot. I think my challenge is learning the spur gear on the E37S. I tried 1.5 and 2 on my first attempts last weekend. I started a notebook to track my results. I will study the forums daily. Can you direct me to a couple of your favorite online stores and recommended beans? Thank you for the help and advice. Allen
 

CupaGil

Member
May 21, 2022
37
1
Southeast USA
Welcome... don't skimp now... buy freshly roasted speciality coffee for that nice espresso setup :)
Ditto on buy great Beans to produce great coffee'
Suggest you go to the site "Coffee Review" for potential roasters and beans, and buy Kenneth Davis's Book
21st Century Coffee: A Guide
CupaGil
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,650
18
Central North Carolina
Ditto on buy great Beans to produce great coffee'
Suggest you go to the site "Coffee Review" for potential roasters and beans, and buy Kenneth Davis's Book
21st Century Coffee: A Guide
CupaGil
Who cares what that guy or others like/dislike with coffees?!? Same with food critics, tool reviews, you name it... People get paid to post reviews, certainly doesn't mean it will work in your favor. The only way to know if a product will work for your use/expectations is to give it a try yourself and ignore all the online fluff.
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,650
18
Central North Carolina
I’ve just started my research. I did not realize this industry is so large. I’m still trying to dial in a 18g shot in 27-30 seconds and a 30-33 finished shot. I think my challenge is learning the spur gear on the E37S. I tried 1.5 and 2 on my first attempts last weekend. I started a notebook to track my results. I will study the forums daily. Can you direct me to a couple of your favorite online stores and recommended beans? Thank you for the help and advice. Allen
Keep in mind that the numbers tossed around are very basic, sort of ballpark figures. Every coffee, setup, environment, etc. will need changes in your variables to maximize each. You can buy the same exact coffee month after month for a year and each batch will need slight changes pretty much daily to keep it dialed in to suit your taste. Don't run yourself in the ground trying to overthink it though as many new to espresso do just that. Over time after tens of thousands of extractions and literally tons of coffee I know exactly what I like and how to get that daily. Doesn't happen overnight and IMBHO you never master espresso as variables change daily. My current/perfected for me regimen really throws mud in the face of traditional/modern espresso enthusiasts, but I've made the effort to push to this point and nothing else can come close to matching it for my taste/texture preference.

Starting out just bulk buy a quality blend based on general cupping notes that you might like. Of course that's what the roaster might notice with their sense of taste, equipment, etc., but over time you will figure out what bean origins, roast levels, process methods you like and go from there.

For the equipment every setup will vary... depends on the group/basket design, water temp/flow rate/pressure, grind fineness, especially dose, tamp to a degree. For example, I find say a washed Brazilian to be a bit better at a higher dose (19.1 grams), ground a bit coarser and water temp around 202 F, whereas something like a honey processed Indonesian will be better ground finer, lighter dose around 18.8 grams and water temp 199-200 F to dial in for my taste. So many variations in roast level, bean density, etc. There simply is no end to it all and will keep you guessing to some degree every day you approach it, but for me that's why espresso dominates all other forms of coffee as it never gets old/boring.
 
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