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  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    7

    Extremely reliable machine needed

    The title says it all. I'll be moving to a developing country in a few months time. There are no repair services or guarantees valid and I want to take with me a reliable coffee/espresso machine. I've looked into fully automatic bean to cup-machines, but based on owner opinions so far I haven't come across one that would be reliable enough. I need something that I can trust every morning for years to come. I can spend up to 1500$ on this. I've been offered a second hand professional coffee shop machine for a reasonable price, but I don't know if these are any more reliable. So what is the best way to go?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,541
    IMBHO the only choice would be a manual lever machine... nothing else (espresso-wise) will come close for your situation. Very simple, not much to go wrong and easy to maintain, while providing some of the best espresso you will get out of ANY machine. Take a small tube of Dow Corning 111, a descaling agent and a rebuild kit and you will be good to go for years. Throw in a good hand mill (espresso capable) for equally long lasting results.
    I'm a legend among my own kind... you my friend are just a legend in your own mind. Later!

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Memphis,TN
    Posts
    10
    I agree with shadow745, a manual lever machine is probably the most reliable machine I can think of. I eventually got tired of replacing pumps etc on my automatics & went with a manual. It took a little bit of practice for consistency at first, but eventually I got it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Michigan, US
    Posts
    1,802
    I will third that.... And do not buy used commercial machine. You will regret that move. Manual machines rarely break down and also it is normally very easy to fix if you have any problems. I don't like hand mill grinders but also they never really break or have any problems that you can not fix.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeJunky View Post
    I will third that.... And do not buy used commercial machine. You will regret that move. Manual machines rarely break down and also it is normally very easy to fix if you have any problems. I don't like hand mill grinders but also they never really break or have any problems that you can not fix.
    Ok,
    sounds really that manual is the way to go. I'm surprised that there isn't a semi- or fully automatic that would be the kind of industry reference that never breaks. Maybe mankind needs to land on Mars before we can get coffee making automated reliably.

    I'll go shopping in Italy for one of those manual machines + grinder and start learning to use the machine right away. The nearest town in Italy is only a couple of hours drive away.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    7
    Just wanted to thank you all for the excellent advice. I got myself a La Pavoni Professional about 2 months ago and I have discovered a whole new world of coffee with it. Not to forget that it is also a beautiful design that makes guests go Wow. One of the 2 best things I've ever bought - the other is my BMW 7-series. Big thanks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Michigan, US
    Posts
    1,802
    You have great taste in your stuff... BMW and La Pavoni. Thanks for reporting back.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    7
    Just a quick update on my La Pavoni story. I've now been living in Bolivia for 4 months and I've had serious issues getting good espresso out of the Pavoni. Earlier I got great cups. So I started suspecting the local water quality and tried ~10 different coffee beans. By the way the coffee bean quality over here is absolutety top - hence event more frustrating not to get out decent espresso out of it. I tried with mineral water, filtered, non-filtered water etc, but it just wasn't the same as before. Then I started wondering wether the high altitude & thin air had something to do with it. Bingo! After adjusting the temperature/pressure setting higher (a screw under the bottom plate of the Pavoni) I'm finally getting reasonable cups. Not quite as good as I used to have, but I'm getting closer. The local Yungas coffee takes time to get used to as well since the roasting seems a bit different - not as dark as Italian.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Near Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    5,003
    Thanks for the update. I'm glad you didn't give up, and you found a solution to your problem.

    It's great to see when someone's detective work pays off. Nice job!

 

 

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