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  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Salt Lake City
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    1,021

    What is your Mindset?

    I wrote this piece back in April, and I think it's an important piece to read. Everyone who I know who is at top of their craft, whether it's a chef, chocolate maker, pianist, or writer... they all think in this manner. We all share a fundamental way of thinking about things. One of the reasons why your execution may not be where you want it to be is because of how you inherently think about things within your chosen field. I am inspired by many people in our industry and in other disciplines as wide ranging as culinary (chefs) to musicians to professional athletes.

    In the end, it's about, thinking "I can do better." and doing it. Excellence isn't just about a state of mind, it's about "doing". Then, you know it. It's real, You made it happen. You know. And that's the difference.

    ------------------------------------

    This is my Mindset...


    When I first started to explore the world of Specialty Coffee in the early 2000's, and we started visiting the places everyone considered to be the best roasters, coffee shops, and purveyors of espresso, I was delighted, and fascinated. And through it all, I had one mindset.



    Whatever they were doing, whatever level of sublime tastiness they had achieved, whatever level of mastery they were showing in their craft -- whatever it was had already been done. That meant it was possible. And because I knew it was possible, and that someone had already been doing it at that level, then that was my minimum standard.



    My minimum standard, my starting point for coffee excellence was measured by what the best of the best were doing. And until what I was doing was on par, or better than what they were doing, it never saw the light of day. Whether it was learning how to roast or understanding that siphon brewing has everything to do with philosophy first, technique second.


    There's always someone who will be doing something great. And to whoever you are, I applaud your genius. Thank you for showing me that, now I'm going to do it better.

    That's my mindset.
    John Piquet
    caffe d'bolla
    Salt Lake City, UT
    caffedbolla.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Quetzaltenango, Guatemala
    Posts
    1,748
    John, thanks for sharing your "mindset". It was a sincere thread and I really enjoyed reading it. thank you.

    I guess that everyone has different "mindset" about coffee.

    here is mine: I do not see "coffee" as a specific ART that can be or should be perfected. of course, it is great if you can be perfect (or near perfect) in whatever you do, roasting, different coffee making methods and so forth.

    For me, Coffee is a Culture. People. Mountains. Coffee plants. Rain.

    Specially, it is a personal adventure that includes a lot of interesting experiences.

    Believe me, I also try for perfection, the excellence (BTW, speaking of excellence, please try out www.theexcellentcup.com Peter's online shop and he has some great ones). Who doesn't want to, right? Specially if you really want to be good at something. And I really want to be good at what I do.

    However, I do not see the perfection, excellence as my destination.

    I am enjoying the journey, travelling, experimenting different things, helping the people who are in coffee world.....I still have decades and decades to go to be anywhere near "the excellence". 99% I will never be close enough to brag about it. (I believe that a person who has true excellence/perfection will not show how great he or she is. He/she will be too humble to show who she/he is.)

    But I am one of those people who will be totally content with drinking a latte that made out of a goat milk that got milked just few minutes ago.
    Last edited by ensoluna; 07-15-2017 at 03:46 PM.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Inland Northwest
    Posts
    10
    Coffee is such a complex socio-economic entity, but when it comes to ROASTING coffee I like to experiment. I don't go along with established mindsets (had to to learn how to roast though.) It amazes me how different any given lot of coffee can taste based on slight deviations in roast profile (air flow, temp, time, end point, etc.)

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    1,021
    CoffeeDude1,

    Thanks for your response.

    As we are at altitude here in Salt Lake City, I had to develop my own adjusting roasting parameters from the ground up. I started with the basics and translated a 20+ page article on traditional and modern roasting practices from Italian and espresso and used that as a base to start from. I tasted and took a lot of notes and made a host of mistakes and tasted more and when it was right, I started bagging it. That was almost twelve years ago.

    Yes. Experimenting is fun. It's really the only way to learn how to actually make meaningful roasting profiles. Take a minute from the drying stage and move it to flavor development stage, but keep same total time... how does it change? Move that same minute to the end of the roast, how does it change? Does it change for both SHB and soft beans? What about Margogype and Gesha? Does it change in the same manner or differently? What about various techniques for building mouthfeel and texture without sacrificing clarity?

    Keep roasting!!
    John Piquet
    caffe d'bolla
    Salt Lake City, UT
    caffedbolla.com

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    5
    There's this song on YouTube called "Confessions of A Coffee Addict" by Kevin Blue that is my mindset.

    This song is my mindset, I'm a coffee addict.

 

 

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