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  1. #1
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    Interesting facts about coffee around the world

    According to coffee history, Coffee beans were a prize possession of the Egyptians and were so valuable that they were used as currency.
    Also, prior to 1000 A.D., coffee berries were eaten, not brewed. It was at this time that Arab traders brought coffee to their homeland and cultivated the plant for the first time.

    if you know of some very interesting coffee facts (un-common), please post them here.
    thanks

  2. #2
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    Theodore Roosevelt was one avid coffee drinker. It is claimed that he drank a gallon of coffee every day...half of my daily intake...but still impressive! 'The Rough Rider' and onetime US President is credited with coining the Maxwell House slogan "Good to the Last Drop". In a side note, I'd like to add that Raven's Brew Coffee in Alaska has a Kopi Luwak offering, and a t-shirt bearing the label graphic with the caption: "Good to the Last Dropping"!

  3. #3
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    it is very interesting to know that in the 1970s, El Salvador was the third largest coffee exporter in the world and the first in productivity. (now, #1 is Brazil, #2 is Vietnam, #3 is Indonesia and #4 is Colombia), But due to political problems, civil war, and devastating earthquakes (7.2 in 1982, 5.7 (it seems small, but killed 2K people, 10K injured and 60K homes destroyed) in 1986, 7.7 in 2001) almost destroyed El Salvador's position in the coffee industry.

    However, in recent years El Salvador has once again became a contender in the coffee industry among Central American countries.


    El Salvador only produces the Arabica. The main varieties include Bourbon and Pacas. Bourbon accounts for 80 percent of the coffee grown in El Salvador. Pacas accounts for 15 percent and the rest include Pacamara, Caturra, Catuai, and Catisic.


    Most El Salvador coffees are soft body with low acidity.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ensoluna View Post
    it is very interesting to know that in the 1970s, El Salvador was the third largest coffee exporter in the world and the first in productivity. (now, #1 is Brazil, #2 is Vietnam, #3 is Indonesia and #4 is Colombia), But due to political problems, civil war, and devastating earthquakes (7.2 in 1982, 5.7 (it seems small, but killed 2K people, 10K injured and 60K homes destroyed) in 1986, 7.7 in 2001) almost destroyed El Salvador's position in the coffee industry.

    However, in recent years El Salvador has once again became a contender in the coffee industry among Central American countries.


    El Salvador only produces the Arabica. The main varieties include Bourbon and Pacas. Bourbon accounts for 80 percent of the coffee grown in El Salvador. Pacas accounts for 15 percent and the rest include Pacamara, Caturra, Catuai, and Catisic.


    Most El Salvador coffees are soft body with low acidity.
    In 2001, I was considering opening a mobile coffee service using an old Airstream trailer I purchased on eBay. I took a coffee roasting class at the Coffee Training Institute in Burlingame CA with Robert Hensley. His assistant was from El Salvador. By coincidence, one of my classmates was also from El Salvador, and she was hoping to learn about coffee so that she could get involved in the family coffee business and help export their coffee to the US. This was an interesting dynamic, as they had both lived through the civil war, but on opposite sides of the conflict. Robert's assistant...cannot recall his name at the moment...was from a poor family, and she was from an affluent family in the coffee trade. What a recollection of stories I heard from two very different perspectives. All I know is that after hearing their stories, I was much more appreciative for living here is the US and not having had to endure the tragedy and hardship they endured. I still would not feel safe traveling to El Salvador.

  5. #5
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    just googled it, and i got know that the coffee industry employs 25 million people around the world. that a Great thing

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Peaberry View Post
    In 2001, I was considering opening a mobile coffee service using an old Airstream trailer I purchased on eBay. I took a coffee roasting class at the Coffee Training Institute in Burlingame CA with Robert Hensley. His assistant was from El Salvador. By coincidence, one of my classmates was also from El Salvador, and she was hoping to learn about coffee so that she could get involved in the family coffee business and help export their coffee to the US. This was an interesting dynamic, as they had both lived through the civil war, but on opposite sides of the conflict. Robert's assistant...cannot recall his name at the moment...was from a poor family, and she was from an affluent family in the coffee trade. What a recollection of stories I heard from two very different perspectives. All I know is that after hearing their stories, I was much more appreciative for living here is the US and not having had to endure the tragedy and hardship they endured. I still would not feel safe traveling to El Salvador.
    Very nice story, Doug.
    I have been in El Salvador numerous times since twenty years ago.
    the good thing is that the country is getting better and better, economic and security wise.
    I believe that since few years back, they even switched their currency to US Dollars and doing very very well in so many ways.
    Some of my customers even told me that El Salvador feels even more safer than Guatemala. That is something.

    PS: there are few countries that use US Dollar as their own countries currency : El Salvador, Panama and Ecuador come to my mind.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa.scottlive View Post
    just googled it, and i got know that the coffee industry employs 25 million people around the world. that a Great thing
    Yep. that is correct. from 25 millions, 5 millions are from Brazil.

  8. #8
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    We often hear about "shade grown coffee" and in most cases, we all have to pay few pennies extra for this "shade grown coffee".
    But did you know that India is the only country that grows all of its coffee under shade. This shade grown helps to produce a mild, yet full-bodied taste and an exotic aroma.

    India coffee is rooted in spirituality and coffee growers are exceptionally passionate about their crops. (well.... that is what they say... about "spirituality", but I am not so certain. Perhaps I need to investigate bit more about this)

    India coffee crops are some of the most well tended crops in the world. Because the coffee is shade-grown, up to 50 different types of shade trees are found in coffee plantations. A variety of spices and fruit crops are also grown on coffee plantations and include cardamom, vanilla, and pepper, orange and banana.


    India also produces the Robusta variety known as Kaapi Royale. India has consistently produced and exported some of the finest coffees in the world for more than 150 years.

  9. #9
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    Most of people knows that there are two main types of coffee : Arabica (70% of world production. aka. Coffea Arabica) and Robusta (30% of production. aka Coffea Canephora). but in fact, there is one more type that hardly no one talk about due to very tiny production from Indonesia.

    LIBERICA COFFEE.

    This coffee specie was first discovered in Liberia, west Africa. It is huge coffee tree, growing up to 9 meters and gives much larger cherries than all other coffee plants. (below photo is the leaves of Liberica coffee tree. they are the biggest coffee tree leaves in the world) This plant was brought to Indonesia a the end of 19th century to replace the Arabica trees killed by coffee rust.
    Flavor wise, it is similar to Robusta, but since the supply is very limited, they are being sold much more expensive than normal Arabica beans.

    In Indonesia, they produce 80% of Robusta, 19% of Arabica and only 1% of Liberica.

    Interesting facts about coffee around the world-16.jpg

  10. #10
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    I just read this from Global Coffee Report.

    Melbourne is already well known city for coffee.
    A Professor of Geotech in Melbourne University has found that recycled coffee grounds can be used to create a material strong enough to be used as a layer of road that sits under the surface and provides foundations for the roads in Australia.
    He estimates that the coffee grounds from all of Melbourne's cafes would be enough to build about 5 kilometers of road each year.

 

 
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