Clover Coffee Machine

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coffeeloverlisa

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If you were given a gift certificate to buy one, would you?

(I have seen a page online where 4 are for sale for 8 and 9 k)
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
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Hartford and New Haven, CT
I personally won't. It is not within my budget. There are plenty of single brewing devices out there that are way cheaper and can compete well against Clover. If I were to spend that kind of money, I upgrade my roaster and get a few top of the line grinders.
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,588
2
Central North Carolina
Not a chance.... it is an interesting idea, but IMO the cost far outweighs the end result. Just watched a short video on exactly how it works, but looks too confusing for the average customer (video indicated the customer would be operating) and also appears to create quite the mess. I just can't see it making better brewed coffee than a good commercial Bunn setup... Later!
 
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coffeeloverlisa

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Note I wrote Gift Certificate i.e free no charge-o nada (hypothetical of course 8) )

Money not an issue here. Do you want the thing or not?

Good reason in Shadow's reply for a NO vote... mess yech
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,588
2
Central North Carolina
Yeah I'd take it for free and sell it for a bit of profit. IMO nothing takes the place of espresso from a good machine. All hands-on and me doing all the work. Especially with my lever machine. I'd use a 2 group lever in the mobile espresso van we operate if I didn't have a great machine in it already... and was able to talk my wife into learning things the old school way. Later!
 
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coffeeloverlisa

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Selling ok, but sneaky way out!

Is the machine a good way to get folks to try high end coffee? Is it the wonder of the world it pretends to be> How about SB buying them all... yet still the price is falling and the used ones. 11K to 8-9K

Must be the fuss and mess. Maybe there will be a less expensive, easier one soon for mortals... like the mac was when super computers were out, or Sony Beta thought they were the rage?
 

SlowRain

New member
Jul 16, 2008
34
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a Canadian expat in Taiwan
The world is full of fads, and the coffee world is no different. The Clover was expensive, revolutionary, elite, and fancy. Almost everyone in third-wave coffee fell for it, and they fell hard. I don't mean to be too critical of the unit itself; I mean to be critical of the people who praised it endlessly as the salvation of coffee, only to turn their backs on it and thumb their noses at it starting the day Starbucks bought it. Or, at the very least, they've gone dead silent, as if even mentioning it now would be to call attention to their trending ways. If the coffee tasted so wonderful then, why doesn't it tastes so wonderful now? It's a problem I have with the coffee industry: the taste of coffee is too often more directly associated with the brand of equipment that produces the brew than the flavor in the cup. Some of the largest proponents from before are now quiet, or else exploring the next fad (vac pot, pour over, etc.).

As to the Clover, I like the coffee from it. I think it's a quick and easy way to make a good cup of coffee. I never had a problem with too many fines (but, hey, I like French press coffee). Some people discovered--with the aid of ExtractMojo, I think--that it needed a larger dose to get into that Gold Cup zone. When my local coffee shop started uppping the dose, I had to start adding water to tone it down.

Is it worth $11K? Definitely not. But a couple thousand dollars should be okay. However, I think an inverted AeroPress with a fine screen and something to insulate it a bit would also do the trick.
 

nhanlhyn07

New member
Nov 22, 2009
1
0
How the Clover is changing the way we think about coffee? I think it combines French press and vacuum methods to produce one of the best cups of coffee. I think I am right.


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