Coffee Pods

Rowley

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Mar 7, 2003
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California
Coffee Pod definition: A coffee pod is pre-ground coffee contained in a paper filter, ready for use in any traditional coffee machine.


Who has used coffee pods at home or their business?

I am wondering if they are worthwhile investments, do they make good coffee? Are they easy to clean up? What made you decide to try a coffee pod?

If you have never used them, What would it take for you to try them out?
 

wulf

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Oct 29, 2003
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London, UK
It sounds like a 'coffee bag'. These were something I came across about ten years ago. They were similar to tea bags and (as I recall) produced a reasonable cup. However, I haven't seen them on the shelves for ages - it wouldn't surprise me if the coffee went off too quickly... or maybe it was a good idea but just didn't catch on enough for companies to bother pursuing it.

It certainly tasted better than instant coffee but with less mess than ground coffee.

Wulf
 
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Rowley

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Mar 7, 2003
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California
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Interesting history lesson, I always assumed something like your defined "coffee bag" existed but never had anyone actually mention it specifically.

But alas, The coffee pods I described are not for single usage, maybe on espresso machines, but they are trying to be sold to coffee shops as a new way to make coffee. Frankly I expect that someone in the middle of nowhere that doesn't have anything to do with coffee thought up the idea and is trying to market it. From what I have seen so far, I would be afraid the grinds become stale before you even get them home or your shop, let alone time spent in storage before their days use.
 

octalpus

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Oct 29, 2003
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San Antonio, TX
These sound like the bags in hotel rooms... Little square "packets" of coffee inside a filter that you pop into the filter basket of the in-room drip machine. I've only seen the usual store variety, such as Folger's or Maxwell House. They're always sealed individually when I see them. Not great coffee, but after you've been traveling and need to wake up, it resembles some sort of coffee product. It's definitely not something I'd use on purpose, and I certainly wouldn't frequent a shop that used them.
 

topher

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Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
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Boca Raton
Pods are crap...that is just my opinion...a great espresso can only be made with freshly ground coffee! I have tried them before...and it wasn't good at all!
 

JoeSophmore

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Dec 5, 2003
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East coast Washington
Crap, Schmap

topher said:
Pods are crap...that is just my opinion...a great espresso can only be made with freshly ground coffee! I have tried them before...and it wasn't good at all!

There is a kiosk near where I work that has tossed out their barista equipment and installed pod clients. Tried it, hated it. Crema was a little yellow ring around the edge, burnt/thin flavor.

Calling it crap give crap coffee a bad name.
 

notmuffy

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Mar 25, 2003
140
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New Jersey
wulf said:
It sounds like a 'coffee bag'. These were something I came across about ten years ago. They were similar to tea bags and (as I recall) produced a reasonable cup. However, I haven't seen them on the shelves for ages - it wouldn't surprise me if the coffee went off too quickly... or maybe it was a good idea but just didn't catch on enough for companies to bother pursuing it.

It certainly tasted better than instant coffee but with less mess than ground coffee.

Wulf

Wow, I guess it WAS 10 years ago now! :) They are still readily available in the US. They were extremely popular among University students when they came out.
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
3,724
11
Boca Raton
When the coffee bags came out or the University students? Its early and I am confused...need more coffee from fresh grounds....That is the way coffee should be made not from instant...and not from pre-ground packs :roll:
 

wulf

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Oct 29, 2003
55
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London, UK
notmuffy said:
Wow, I guess it WAS 10 years ago now! :) .... They were extremely popular among University students when they came out.
Funnily, I was a university student at the time - actually, I think it was about THIRTEEN years ago when I started uni and my mum packed me off with a bunch of supplies to keep me going...

It was a thoughtful present but too expensive for me to keep up (I lived quite frugally and made it though my studies without incurring any debt!). I can't recall exactly what I did do for coffee (there might be a repressed memory of the cheapest coffee powder drifting around in there) but I certainly got into the habit of getting several goes out teabags....

Fast foward to the present and I'm quite happy for coffee bags to remain an experience in my past ;)

Wulf
 
I guess my sentiments reflect others who have posted before me. In my opinion coffee pod espressos are flat and lack the flavour from freshly ground beans. These days it seems most of the big R&G boys, especially those out of Italy, sell pods. Illy, Lavazza and segfredo all have pods. In Italy the roasters have quite a bit of sway with the machine manufacturers. Most of the roasters opperate a system where by a cafe signing up to a two year contract with a roaster for supply gets a machine "at cost" or even for free (for duration of contract of course!). Recently most major Italian machine companies have funnily enough begun production of pod/fresh R&G or even pod coffee only machines. My guess is that with pod machines the roasters can push their pods early.... ie I have read such claims that "pod coffee stays fresh for 6 months!"..... so the roaster may push 6 months of product onto the cafe with the new machine, thus helping to cover costs. I think there is no way that pod product could ever supersede fresh R&G.... why would customers chose a product that is staler than one that came from the local roaster a day ago?
 

pharmboy

New member
Oct 5, 2004
1
0
new york
COFFEE PODS

I have a jura e-70 super automatic so you can see I am serious about espresso. I recently looked into a second machine for my weekend home but could not justify the expense. So I investigated pod (ese) systems.
My wife does not want to mess with coffe grinds etc which is the reason for these machines. I aquired a gaggia classic which uses either pods or regular coffee. I must tell you that it makes superb coffee, much exceeding my expectations. One reason may be its 17.5 bar boiler which gets a great crema.
One trick is using the 45mm pod instead of the 55mm pod. I get a better result due to the smaller pod's tighter tamping. I used illy cafe with great results and also moka doro.
 

Coffee Queen

New member
Oct 11, 2004
2
0
Australia
Coffee Pod machines

Bodum are releasing a new machine called the Granos which can use either Pods or ground. It does an excellent job with either and has a great froth arm.

The secret with Pods is to buy from a reputable supplier who stocks quality coffee, and to store them in a cool, dark (but not damp or cold) place.

On sale in Australia Nov 04.

For more information http://www.mycoffeeshop.com.au/
 

espressomaniac

New member
Jul 8, 2004
67
0
Tacoma
sock coffee

wulf said:
notmuffy said:
Wow, I guess it WAS 10 years ago now! :) .... They were extremely popular among University students when they came out.
Funnily, I was a university student at the time - actually, I think it was about THIRTEEN years ago when I started uni and my mum packed me off with a bunch of supplies to keep me going...

It was a thoughtful present but too expensive for me to keep up (I lived quite frugally and made it though my studies without incurring any debt!). I can't recall exactly what I did do for coffee (there might be a repressed memory of the cheapest coffee powder drifting around in there) but I certainly got into the habit of getting several goes out teabags....

Fast foward to the present and I'm quite happy for coffee bags to remain an experience in my past ;)

Wulf

I too was living in the days of extreem budget, the last painful memory was of "sock coffee" where you'd take the grinds and put it into a sock and throw it in some hot water, thus the invention of "sock coffee" to be honest, execept for being able to wash the sock and use it again, it seemed to be the same as the pods, or coffee bags of yesteryear. Needless to say, it's something you use in extreem cases.

They are cleaner, and in fact, I was officially booted from the kitchen to make coffee because of the mess, so I see where that point is valid, and pretty much the only one that could justify someone going to pod route. I've built a home espresso cart line to address that as well for others that don't mind the mess but need their true espresso :)
 
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