espresso colour

CoffeeKid

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Jul 1, 2006
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howcomes on latte art videos their espresso is a wierd browny sludgy colour and mine is coming out blacky brown thin with a small layer of crema ontop?
 

topher

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Aug 14, 2003
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Boca Raton
Black thin and a thin layer is not a good pull of espresso. It is probably because your epresso isn't being prepared properly. It could be a number of things....grind, freshness of beans..and the list goes on....lets start with this...How long of a shot are you pulling and how much time does it take to extract your shot?
 
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CoffeeKid

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Im using a 5 cm tall (roughly) shot cup for my espresso, and it takes roughly 20 seconds to extract the coffee.

I buy ready ground coffee, I thin k this may be the problem, but i would need someone elses opinion, who knows more about it.
 

topher

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Try grinding your own...grind it a bit more fine than you have now. Try and get it closer to 25 seconds...oh and buy a burr grinder...a blade one will not work for esprsso. :wink:
 

La Crema Coffee

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Oct 9, 2005
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Factor this:

Check H20 Temp, grind, and as mentioned to a-lesser degree tamp. I pregring d-caff espresso and have good crema... ;) BUt then again I grind all of it after finding a good grind, pullin g a good few shots and then loosining the grind a tiny bit to allow for " it better to under extract tha over extract. I usually look at temperature of water/machine and grind.....Given that the espresso is good.In my case I know it is because I roasted it, and it's served in both of my drive thrus.....Usually the dark liquid you descrribed is seen at firs using my coffee and the machine being not hot enough and the grind being off. As you can tell, there are a few factors that need to be insured of quality before trying that espresso stand flavor at home.

CIAO bella,

Troy
 

topher

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hahaha Troy...like before..glad you are back...and humble
Given that the espresso is good.In my case I know it is because I roasted it,
but for real..you did hit an important factor...freshness! He/She buys coffee ground...how old is it before you get it home...temp, tamp, grind...as before its a start and lets see how it improves :wink:
 
I would agree with Topher and Troy on this one. Freshness- the grind of the pre-ground espresso blend- may be the foremost and most logical reason for the thin, watery espresso you are pulling. However if changing to whole beans, getting a burr grinder and checking tamp does not work- then you may have a problem with the source water you are using. In Indonesia we often see poor quality water sources contributing to poor quality espresso. Over chlorinated water, water that has been heavily treated through some of the reverse-Osmosis systems I have seen out there- ends up producing flat, thin coffee. My machine tech's love some of these filtration systems- they remove just about every chemical from source water- makes for a long life for the machine but flat thin espresso!
 

equus007

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Apr 4, 2006
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Austin, Tx
also

More to keep in mind
1.Where are you storing your pre-ground coffee after you open the package?

This can also effect how oxidized it is. Frost free fridges will suck all the moisture out which kills the grounds as well. I never had much of a problem with pre-ground because packaging has advanced to the point that you can keep it for ~3months from grind time with out it going bad...I also drink alot so it doesn't sit around my place long. Grinding your own is always preferable. Try to buy in smaller portions as well. The extra packaging sucks but sometimes it is needed.

2. Are you immediatly using the shot or do you let it sit?

When I train people on home machines the first thing I always tell them(since most want lattes) is you froth first. Shots, especially from pre-ground, will lose their seperation...quickly if not kept at a proper temperature. You must extract into a warmed cup(pref. ceramic though thick walled pyrex works as well)
 
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CoffeeKid

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I may try grinding my own coffee in future, and investing in a burr grinder.

I store the ground coffee in my fridge after opening, but i dont think this is why because even when i open a new packet straight from the store I still get the thin black liquidy espresso.
 
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