Espresso vs Drip Coffee

FXAdam

New member
Jun 16, 2006
20
0
Hello,

I have been roasting beans for holiday gifts this year and ended up roasting some espresso blends for some people and some solo varities for the regular coffee drinkers. Personally I drink coffee at home because I don't have an espresso machine, but I thought I should brew a pot with the espresso blends so I have a better idea what I am giving people. The resulting coffee was a lighter flavor than I find I get when using single variety beans.

What I am wondering is whether the beans used in espresso blends are selected to be at their optimum when they are used to make espresso and are not suited to being made in a "normal" coffee maker?

A further question would be if anyone can tell me what the difference is between the way that an espresso machine extracts the various flavors and oils etc from the coffee grounds and the way a coffee maker does it? I don't have much espresso experience so I am not really sure what is going on inside the machine.

Thanks.
 

SFG75

New member
Dec 29, 2004
26
0
Midwest
FXAdam said:
Hello,

A further question would be if anyone can tell me what the difference is between the way that an espresso machine extracts the various flavors and oils etc from the coffee grounds and the way a coffee maker does it? I don't have much espresso experience so I am not really sure what is going on inside the machine.

Thanks.

Espresso features hot water that is blasted through the bean, resulting in a higher concentration of flavor and surprisingly less caffeine due to the quick process. You also get a complexity of flavor and of course, the crema on the surface due to the chemical reaction of the oils and other items on/in the bean. :D
 

mrgnomer

New member
Jan 22, 2006
149
0
Canada
Ditto what SFG75 said about espresso extraction.

C02 and other oils/compounds in fresh roasted coffee are subjected to water at brewing temp under 8-9+ bars of pressure causing them to be drawn out and suspended as crema. Espresso extraction is unique and espresso enthusiasts would say it extracts all the best coffee has to offer. A good espresso tastes like ground coffee smells.

Drip or other methods like vacuum, turkish, percolator etc. do not use significant pressure for extraction but rather require coffee to be extracted by saturating grinds with water and steeping them for a time. Espresso requires between 20-30+ sec for ideal extraction depending on the style you're using and extracts elements drip cannot. Drip type requires longer steeping and doesn't extract what espresso does.
 
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