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Favorite Blends

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
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Hi WhyCoffee, I have tried both pre and post blend, and mine is only limited experience, but pre blending was WAY better. The argument remains that different beans need different roast times/profiles to bring out their best, so one should post blend. However, it does not work out that way for me. The flavors of the blend mesh much better, for me by blending the beans first. Try it both ways and let us know what you find.
God Bless,
Wayne
PS my wife prefers her hazelnut to come from a squirt or three of sweet hazelnut flavored syrup into the coffee just as it is being served. YMMV.
 

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
0
^^^^^^^
Agreed WhyCoffee on all counts. Can take the boy outta Texas, but can't take the Texas outta the boy!!!! Lived overseas since '92. And lived in Thailand for 18 of those years.
And we know our fried rice too over here.
Still a Texans fan. God Bless,
Wayne
 

Musicphan

Well-known member
May 11, 2014
1,613
38
Kansas City
Pre-blending doesn't work great when you have two beans of different density... for example - if you had a high grown Ethiopia bean and a lower grown Natural/Pulped Natural Brazil. The Ethiopian will be much greater density which wants lots of heat up front and then slow down the heat. A low grown Brazil would like soft heat up front and gradual heat through the process. In that situation, it would be best to roast separately and post-roast blend. However, if all of the beans are say Central or Central/South America I personally pre-blend.
 

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
0
Perhaps I should state more clearly what it is I am trying to do. I want to make/roast a blend that will be a really good, drinkable straight double shot espresso. But my wife and daughter like to add it to milk and ice for a tall drink with tiramisu or hazelnut syrup. Actually I love it that way too but without the syrup, LOVE the chocolate taste it gets with iced milk. BUT, diet wise I most often need to drink it black, most often as a longo.
Any ideas what blend I need that can be double purpose like that? I have the following beans here and available to roast/blend: All Arabicas (well I have a small package of Robusta but would not serve that to an enemy!!!!!!) Thai Chiang Mai, Brasilian F. Rio Preto Red Bourbon, Rwandan, Ethiopian Sidama Deri Kochera, Sumatran Mandelhing, Guatemala Finca el Rincon, Yemen Mocca Sanani, Indian Monsooned Malabar, and some Costa Rican La Pastora, yellow honey which is too acidic for me.
From that great selection I should be able to make an awesome blend. Any suggestions, ratios, family recipes??????
I find the Thai and Brasilian beans make a great base. The Sumatran beans add great body. The MM beans add something I really like, not sure what?
Right now about 20% each Thai, Brasilian, Sumatran, MM and either Eth. Sidama or Rwandan make a great drink with milk. But are not making the drinkable espresso or longo that I can enjoy black.
Thanks, God Bless,
Wayne
 
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Musicphan

Well-known member
May 11, 2014
1,613
38
Kansas City
Try 50-60% of the Guat Rincon (excellent Finca... what I'm drinking right now) 30-40% of Brazil, 10% Sumatra for crema... that should hold up with milk and give you a nice espresso. Roast about halfway between 1st & 2nd crack.
 

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
0
^^^^^^^^^ Thanks Musicphan, I will try that!!!!
I suspect I like a darker roast than you do, but I will never know until I try it.
Since I am using the Gene Cafe and cracks are hard to hear, let alone one that has not happened yet, can you give me a roast level I am going for????
God Bless,
Wayne
 
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shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,630
16
Central North Carolina
Hi WhyCoffee, I have tried both pre and post blend, and mine is only limited experience, but pre blending was WAY better. The argument remains that different beans need different roast times/profiles to bring out their best, so one should post blend. However, it does not work out that way for me. The flavors of the blend mesh much better, for me by blending the beans first. Try it both ways and let us know what you find.
God Bless,
Wayne
PS my wife prefers her hazelnut to come from a squirt or three of sweet hazelnut flavored syrup into the coffee just as it is being served. YMMV.

From a home roasting perspective I definitely think it's better to pre-roast blend. It would take a lot of time/energy to roast individual single origins to possibly different levels, then try to figure out a good ratio. I buy quality green blends so each coffee will be slightly different at the end of the roast and I end up with great layered flavors for my espresso. Would also mention that of all the true single origins I've tried (green and already roasted) none impressed me as they're too one-dimensional.

Wayne, you mention that cracking sounds can be difficult to really hear well with the GeneCafe. You should try roasting deaf as I lost all hearing around 8 months ago and it was devastating to roast being deaf. Now I focus mostly on appearance, aroma, temperature, etc. I don't mention that to be sarcastic, just to let others know it's quite possible to roast great coffee consistently without being able to hear.
 

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
0
RESPECT Shadow745 to be able to roast coffee without hearing, well done!!!!! That is pretty much what I am learning to do with the Gene Cafe, though I can hear a little bit.
Glad you are able to manage and be successful in your roasts.
And YES, agreed on blending then roasting, which is all I do.
Enjoy, God Bless,
Wayne
 

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
0
Ok, Musicphan, I tried your suggestion, roasted to between 1st and 2nd crack and I cannot drink it straight at all, much too sour for me! With LOTS of milk, sweetner and ice the espresso becomes drinkable but only barely. My wife even wants to know what I did to mess up my coffee. Sorry, we are darker roast people as I suspected
 
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Musicphan

Well-known member
May 11, 2014
1,613
38
Kansas City
Ok, Musicphan, I tried your suggestion, roasted to between 1st and 2nd crack and I cannot drink it straight at all, much too sour for me! With LOTS of milk, sweetner and ice the espresso becomes drinkable but only barely. My wife even wants to know what I did to mess up my coffee. Sorry, we are darker roast people as I suspected

No need to be sorry... your tasted buds are your taste buds. Out of curiosity - how are you making the espresso and how much are you using?
 

Tex_Thai

New member
May 17, 2019
17
0
Hi Musicphan, I make a doppio on my Breville Barista Express, well dialed in. Also tried that blend as a double with water to make it a longo or Americano, but no joy, just too sour for me. MIGHT be good with another brew method, probably would make a tasty cold brew. But that is not what I am looking for.
Thanks,
God Bless,
Wayne
 

Musicphan

Well-known member
May 11, 2014
1,613
38
Kansas City
Hi Musicphan, I make a doppio on my Breville Barista Express, well dialed in. Also tried that blend as a double with water to make it a longo or Americano, but no joy, just too sour for me. MIGHT be good with another brew method, probably would make a tasty cold brew. But that is not what I am looking for.
Thanks,
God Bless,
Wayne

Sounds good... sourness is usually a sign of over extraction (or not using enough coffee) which is why I asked. But if your machine is dialed in its just not your preferred flavor profile.
 
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