home coffee growing

Forrest Gump

New member
May 8, 2008
11
0
Has anyone tried to grow their own coffee plant in addition to roasting and grinding ones own? My green thumb sister just pointed it out to me and i was wondering if any of the coffee lovers on these forums have tried this before.
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,222
6
Near Philadelphia, PA
Hi Forrest Gump,

I was wondering the same thing, but I was afraid to ask. I can't wait to see if you get any more responses to your question.

I imagine in order to grow a coffee plant, a person would need to have a decent size enclosed porch or sunroom that gets lots of sun during the day. Since the coffee beans pick up flavors from the environment, I wonder what home-grown coffee would taste like.

Rose
 

jlyon10

Super Moderator
Feb 16, 2007
436
1
Clemmons, NC
I am growing a coffee plant I got on a website. It is still alive but hasn't flowered yet. I live in NC and keep it outside in the summer but it is in the second floor of my house for the winter. I got it last winter. I wonder if I need a second tree or if it is self polinating?
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,222
6
Near Philadelphia, PA
Hi Jim,

Wow! A coffee plant. That's fantastic!

How tall is it now? I'm picturing about 3 feet tall.... sort of like a little potted Christmas tree.

I remember reading that it takes a few years for a coffee plant to flower and make coffee cherries. Maybe your plant just needs some more time.

Of course I may be mistaken, but I think I remember reading about the delicious honey that comes from the bees that hang out around the coffee plants. I guess polination would be a challenge if the plants stay indoors. (unless you figure out a way to do it yourself with Q-tips or something)

Doesn't it take hundreds of coffee cherries to make a cup of coffee? Can one plant produce that much?

I hope you'll post a photo when your plant flowers!

Rose
 

keith900

New member
Jan 18, 2009
4
0
Premium arabica coffee grows best at high altitudes (around 5,000 feet) in tropical regions in volcanic soil... ideal conditions don't really exist so much in the contiguous U.S., so the coffee eventually produced would probably be somewhat low-grade.

That said, plenty of folks have had coffee plants, and I've been thinking of getting one myself. Won't be able to grow the best coffee in the world, but will be able to gain a first-hand understanding and appreciation for coffee growing and processing, et cetera, eh? Have been wondering on whether one could buy volcanic soil for it, as that's one variable that could be controlled.
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,222
6
Near Philadelphia, PA
Hello ElPugDiablo,

Thank you for posting that blog site!

I really enjoyed reading it and seeing the photos. It was interesting to see how he took care of the coffee plants by trying to imitate the coffee region's growing seasons, etc.

I remember reading in the book, "Javatrecker" by Dean Cycon, that someone discovered that water buffalo manure works great with coffee plants. I guess they actually do need some sort of special fertilizer.

Rose
 

jlyon10

Super Moderator
Feb 16, 2007
436
1
Clemmons, NC
I only roast for myself but I sell green beans that I get from various places. I have had their green beans though for myself because my mother in law got me a gift certificate there, she doesn't understand my business. They were very good.
 

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