How do you fix Soycofee coffee with an Espresso machine?

Brent

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Jan 21, 2007
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Hey everyone, I''m new here, and pretty new to coffee

I just purchased some Soyfee coffee, I have an Espresso maker. How do I make Soyfee with it? I''ve made other regular coffee just fine in it, I know how to use it, however, with Soyfee my coffee is coming out burnt and super concentrated and cannot be consumed because it is just too strong. I''ve tried different methods such as using less, I''ve also tried grinding to a finer grain, no matter what I do I keep getting burnt/extremely strong coffee out of it. Any suggestions?

Thanks
 

cafemakers

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Nov 3, 2004
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Brent said:
Hey everyone, I''m new here, and pretty new to coffee

I just purchased some Soyfee coffee, I have an Espresso maker. How do I make Soyfee with it?

Um, you don't. It's not coffee and will not react the same way under the specific condition of heat and pressure that extract espresso. I suggest that you throw the stuff away and find some real coffee.
 
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Brent

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Jan 21, 2007
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Oh really huh? That is a shame :( I was hoping to have some healthier coffee minus the caffeine.

Any suggestions for an Espresso maker, sans the Caffeine?
 

cafemakers

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Brent said:
Oh really huh? That is a shame :( I was hoping to have some healthier coffee minus the caffeine.

Just out of curiosity, what data do you have that proves coffee is "unhealthy?" I have not seen any clinical evidence of medical complications from coffee consumption, other than hypertension and upset stomach at fairly high levels of intake. I get an upset stomach drinking "healthy" orange juice.
 
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Brent

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Thanks for the help

The reason I'm looking for alternatives to coffee with caffeine is that caffeine has negative reactions with my body and heart, so I stay away from caffeine, but I do love coffee, so it is a conundrum :D

I've got to find that right balance
 

cafemakers

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Brent said:
caffeine has negative reactions with my body and heart, so I stay away from caffeine, but I do love coffee, so it is a conundrum

Conundrum? DRINK DECAFFEINATED COFFEE - if caffeine is your problem, I fail to see the issue. Don't try to stick some other kind of product (soy, chicory, corn, mushrooms, etc.) into a coffee maker, just drink decaffeinated coffee.
 
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Brent

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Thanks,

The reason I was looking for alternatives is because I know that even Decaf isn't 100% Caffeine free.
 

cafemakers

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Brent said:
The reason I was looking for alternatives is because I know that even Decaf isn't 100% Caffeine free.

You must have quite sensitivity to caffeine! Just out of curiosity, are you on some kind of medication that causes this condition?

Decaffeinated coffee contains approximately 2-5 mg/serving. By comparison, consumption of 200-300 mg per day will have no adverse affect. Not until you reach intake of approximately 500 mg will you begin to see symptoms (headaches, anxiety, insomnia) in an "average" person.

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/caffeine/AN01211

The amount of caffeine in decaffeinated coffee is less than 1/10th of a can of cola and as little as 1/25th the amount of a an average chocolate bar. Unless you have some unusual health condition or a diet full of other caffeine laden products, you should be just fine drinking decaffeinated coffee and not have to sacrifice the flavor with unproven and potentially dangerous products.
 

cafemakers

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Hot off of the presses from UPI this morning:

Review: Coffee generally positive
CHICAGO, Jan. 22 (UPI) -- Moderate drinking of coffee is being shown to have generally positive and protective effects on the emergence of disease conditions, say U.S. researchers.

Food Technology reports that recent studies of coffee in combination with reviews of research gathered over the past 30 years reveal that consumption improves glucose regulation and lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, among other favorable effects.

"Many negative health myths about coffee drinking may now be transformed into validated health benefits," says Roger A. Clemens, a functional food expert with the Institute of Food Technologists and nutritional biochemist.

"Scientific evidence now suggests that moderate coffee consumption -- 3 to 5 cups a day -- may be associated with reduced risks of certain disease conditions."

Another area of coffee's positive affect on the body is its possible cancer-protective properties, possibly due to its naturally occurring and brewing-produced antioxidants, according to Clemens.

Some research strongly links coffee's properties to protect blood vessels from dilating as one possible mechanism that brain cells use to defend against Parkinson's disease. One cup of coffee a day may as much as halve the risk of developing this disease, the article states.
 
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