coffee lovers around the world...

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I am doing a research about coffee and I am interested in discovering the different habits around the world. What kind of coffee you can drink in your country? Where do you usually go out for a coffee? Do you have specialized coffee house? What is your personal coffee drink? How do you prepare it at home? I would like to know more about this relationship that you have developed with coffee... and why you especially like your homeland coffee.



In Italy, my favourite place to drink a caffé is at a bar. You pay at the cashier and then drink your coffee at the bar, standing up, quickly (since Italian coffee are strong and short). It is also quite cheap (0.80Euro). I like the unique atmosphere there. Ristretto, espresso, and machiato are my favourite. Italy also have "machina" everywhere -university, train station,...-; they are coffee machine like a vending machine for different kind of coffee.

In France, if you just ask for a coffee, it will be served with a unit of sugar and liquid cream on the side. It is common to ask for an espresso, a "café au lait" (coffee with milk), ristretto, or a cappuccino.

I moved to the United States 3 years ago and I got very impressed with the huge mugs I could see everywhere. How can they drink so much coffee which doesn't taste like a "real" one?! How can you put so much stuff into it like cinnamon? I finally moved my coffee machine and espresso cups with me to make small coffee at home... and got used to go to Starbucks to study with a caffé latte, a mocha frappucino, or a cold and sweetened caffé latte...
 

Rowley

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Mar 7, 2003
322
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California
Hello, very informative post natachouille.

I've lived in Southern California and drank coffee all of my life. As a young kid I would occasionally drink my parent's coffee. I remember it typically being brewed in any standard brewer with store bought canisters of grinds. It tasted sweet like candy because my mother would add tons of cream and sugar, and I drank it watching the Johnny Carson show.

As I grew up, I began to drink lots more coffee, and started to enjoy dark black coffee from some cafes that knew what they where brewing.

Now my favorite coffee is brewed at home in a french press. I will still go out to starbucks from time to time, but tend to get in small arguments with the barista's over getting the exact drink I want to order.
 

Quink

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Feb 11, 2004
80
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Bristol UK
In the UK, it depends on where you are. A decent resaurant will more than likely serve drip coffee with a small pot of cold milk or cream, unless you ask for espresso or similar. the cheaper places to eat, small cafes and whatever will serve you a small styrofoam cup or if your lucky a china mug of instant coffee with their choice of milk if you ask for it white. If they are trying to go up market slightly they will heat up the milk and add coffee powder directly to it. Take that as you will but we also have $tarbucks and others over here. but I'd have to say that unless you go out of your way its likely to be a well stewed drip coffee with cold milk.
 
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natachouille said:
I am doing a research about coffee and I am interested in discovering the different habits around the world. What kind of coffee you can drink in your country? Where do you usually go out for a coffee? Do you have specialized coffee house? What is your personal coffee drink? How do you prepare it at home? I would like to know more about this relationship that you have developed with coffee... and why you especially like your homeland coffee.



In Italy, my favourite place to drink a caffé is at a bar. You pay at the cashier and then drink your coffee at the bar, standing up, quickly (since Italian coffee are strong and short). It is also quite cheap (0.80Euro). I like the unique atmosphere there. Ristretto, espresso, and machiato are my favourite. Italy also have "machina" everywhere -university, train station,...-; they are coffee machine like a vending machine for different kind of coffee.

In France, if you just ask for a coffee, it will be served with a unit of sugar and liquid cream on the side. It is common to ask for an espresso, a "café au lait" (coffee with milk), ristretto, or a cappuccino.

I moved to the United States 3 years ago and I got very impressed with the huge mugs I could see everywhere. How can they drink so much coffee which doesn't taste like a "real" one?! How can you put so much stuff into it like cinnamon? I finally moved my coffee machine and espresso cups with me to make small coffee at home... and got used to go to Starbucks to study with a caffé latte, a mocha frappucino, or a cold and sweetened caffé latte...
:wink: :)
 
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