"Cooking" coffe with dehydrater

Bafa

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Mar 23, 2007
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I have someone insisting that you can cook coffee bean with a dehydrator. The fan in the dehydrator puts out mildly heated air, like a hair dryer on the lowest possible setting. It works great on my fruits, but I don't believe that works to cook coofee because isnt the point of roasting coffee to reach temperature for a certain amount of time so chemical processes can take place? The only thing I think a dehydrator would do is dry out your coffee beans and not make them cooked.

Can someone in the know please give some feed back here and maybe an explaination of why you cant use a dehydrator. Unless of course you can, which I will be greatly suprised.

Thanks!
 
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Bafa

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Mar 23, 2007
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wow... i would have thought I'd have a bunch of responses after four days :p Anybody have any input for me? :D
 

Davec

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Oct 18, 2006
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Old England (UK)
Bafa said:
wow... i would have thought I'd have a bunch of responses after four days :p Anybody have any input for me? :D

They might have thought you were taking the p*ss. However, I am a trusting type and will make the assumption you are perfectly serious :lol:

To roast coffee you need to get the bean to around 220-240C, depending on what your doing and you don't want to bake the beans by roasting too long e.g. longer than 18-19 minutes (depending on roast level). A dehydrator, sort of, doesn't really do this at all and won't roast coffee.

I wish it could...honest, can you imagine it, it would be to Coffee roasting what cold fusion would be to physics 8)
 
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Bafa

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Mar 23, 2007
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Davec said:
I wish it could...honest, can you imagine it, it would be to Coffee roasting what cold fusion would be to physics 8)

LOL nice. Thanks for the answer. :D
 
No surprise...I can confirm you will not be greatly surprised at all. I guess you would even struggle to get much of a physical change to the moisture level in the greens. Many exporters use commercial machines these days to reduce moisture to 11%(+/-). With bean hardness, the home dehydrator might struggle to reduce moisture by much more I would think.
 
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