Do you need a drainage underneath the expresso machine

jay.topz

New member
Feb 7, 2010
1
0
Hi, I'm looking to put an expresso machine in a existing machine. So I notice that there a lot coffee shop have drainage underneath the machine. I was wondering if its require by the health department to have one. I'm located in Washington State. I would like any advice and much appreciate. Also, what other thing do I need like water line, etc.
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,592
4
Central North Carolina
If the machine is to be plumbed in (as pretty much all commercial applications should be), then there will be a drain box under the drip tray that collects water from the group valves, drip tray runoff, etc. and directs that down a flexible hose to a proper drain line/trap.

Machines such as this should have the freshwater feed line plumbed in as well, but the pressure shouldn't be very high and a reducer is sometimes needed.

Believe me, if a machine is to be used in a commercial setting you surely want it to be fully plumbed in. Having a pourover (water tank to fill) or FloJet type setup from 5 gallon bottles along with the need to empty a drip tray constantly would be more of a pain than it's worth. Later!
 

CCafe

New member
Aug 11, 2004
1,557
1
Des Moines, Iowa
jay.topz said:
Hi, I'm looking to put an expresso machine in a existing machine. So I notice that there a lot coffee shop have drainage underneath the machine. I was wondering if its require by the health department to have one. I'm located in Washington State. I would like any advice and much appreciate. Also, what other thing do I need like water line, etc.

Most health departments will allow for a bucket to be placed under the output hose for a temporary solution. Its just easier to plumb it in. I would suggest running PVC drain line as close to the machine as possible. Most of the time people run 1" pvc within a foot of the espresso machine under a cabinet. Then for convenience stick the drain hose down the pvc pipe about 6 inches and make sure it drains properly.

If done right this will help prevent clogs from running standard drain hose that will sag from the heat over time.

Edit: I should also mention that a lot of times if your are right next to a sink they make a Y fitting that replaces a part of your drain pipe on your sink. Its about as easy as unscrewing the the P trap and installing the new piece.

The other thing is a lot of health departments seem to allow any drain line to go directly to a floor drain. So its very possible you can just plumb some pvc pipe right to it.
 

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