Espresso bean reccomndations. something not too acidic

Philosopher

New member
Nov 23, 2008
3
0
California
Hi, I''m looking for something that tastes like chocolate, hazelnut, and tends on the sweeter side. By the way I''m new to the espresso thing. Although I''ve been drinking espressos for years from starbucks, peets and my own steam driven machine, etc. I''ve just taken a real interest in the nuances of coffee. I''ve just transitioned from a steam to a pump driven machine, so be gentle. I also would like to know what I should expect to pay per pound or whatever quantity is standard. I have experienced Lavazza, Illy and Starbucks french roast beans. I''m now aware that a french roast butchers the character of the bean. So I am willing to lighten up on the roast. I would appreciate any suggestions.
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,585
2
Central North Carolina
I'm sure there are others that will chime in, but here's my advice. If you're looking for a specific flavor profile try going to a few pro roaster sites like Intelligentsia, Metropolis, or Counter Culture (just a few of many out there) and e-mail them, tell them what you're looking for and surely they can steer you in the right direction. Another option, would be to seek out any local roasters in your area and do the same thing.

What pump machine did you decide to go with? Grinder? Later!
 
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Philosopher

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Nov 23, 2008
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California
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Thanks for the info.

Keep in mind that I'm a budget minded college student, so I'm just getting my feet wet. I have the DeLonghi EC155 machine, with a Cuisinart bur grinder. Perhaps in the future, I will pick up a Gaggia. By the way, I live in Orange county California. Do I have access to local roasters? I don't have an experience palette, do you think that I can tell the difference between these bean varieties?
 

shadow745

Active member
Aug 15, 2005
1,585
2
Central North Carolina
I have no idea where any local roasters are in your area. You could simply do a search to find some.

I know it's hard to get decent espresso from a low budget. Most would recommend a good grinder and a french press, as it'd give you better results than the equipment you now have. The Cuisinart grinder isn't really any better than buying preground because it pulverizes the beans, but I do know where you're coming from as we were all there at some time.

As you try different roasts you should start to notice a difference between them. It took me awhile and I still suffer from this lack of taste distinction due to allergies and sinus issues, but I can pick up on hints of floral notes and things of that nature most of the time. But you have to have a good grinder and machine that is properly tuned and super fresh beans. The setup you have will teach you the basics to point you in the right direction, but when you upgrade it's kind of like you leap to that next step. But will have to go through the learning process all over because of the proper equipment involved. Later!
 
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Philosopher

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Nov 23, 2008
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California
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Thanks. I found Kean coffee shop and roaster within thirty miles. I picked up some Ethiopian and Brazilian medium roast, and man does it make and amazing difference! The Crema significant and beautifully speckled. For the mean time, this setup will have to satisfy my tastes.
 

TAXENGINEER

New member
Dec 28, 2008
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0
Philospher:
I tried some A&P red bag whole bean ground to expresso size grind.We have an expresso and machines in the office and my wonderful secretary or co-workers make the coffee,expresso and capucino for me.We pitch in for the supplies.
 
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