Flavoring with Cocoa beans??

mulk99

New member
Nov 22, 2004
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I am wonderign why people who use flavor oils and other bean flavoring methods don't use the real deal such ans vanilla bean or Cocoa beans. I have a potential customer who is interested in a specialty blend which will include possible natural flavoring. Is it a possiblity and does anyone have any thought on this?
 

Davec

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Oct 18, 2006
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Old England (UK)
mulk99 said:
I am wonderign why people who use flavor oils and other bean flavoring methods don't use the real deal such ans vanilla bean or Cocoa beans. I have a potential customer who is interested in a specialty blend which will include possible natural flavoring. Is it a possiblity and does anyone have any thought on this?

Vanilla is a long pod isn't it? That aside, other objects other than coffee beans are going to affect the grinder (because it's for grinding coffee) and probably the extraction.

I was exposed to a little "flavouring" as part of some commercial roasting, and the modern flavours of quality are either natural or nature identical. The object is not really to get a flavour so much as an aroma. The "flavour" should be very subtle. Also the flavours in a bottle can be mixed to create other new flavours, so starting with a base of 10 flavours many more can be created.

The "artificial" method of adding flavour also allows a great degree of control and consistency, I think this might be difficult to achieve with "natural" products

Personally I am not a lover of flavoured coffee....sort of defeats the object of drinking it, although I will admit to have experimented with Cardamom (a spice), more as a salute to history than any real wish to add flavours to coffee.
 

Alchemist

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May 2, 2012
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The basic answer is that the flavor in cocoa is mostly oil based and does not extract well from a water extraction (traditional brewing). It's that whole oil and water don't mix bit. Extract of cocoa generally are oil extracted, and then emulsified with something (lecithin and/or sugar often) so the flavor can be carried into the water and then tasted. Alchemist John Chocolate Alchemy
 
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eldub

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Mar 28, 2012
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I don't know, John....

I'm drinking a cup of brewed nibs I purchases from you awhile back that tastes great. (3-1/3T cocoa/16 oz water)

There is a roaster I've talked to who simply places freshly roasted cocoa nibs wrapped in cheesecloth in with his coffee beans for a period of time to infuse the aroma of cocoa. he also does coffee pour-overs with a small amount of cocoa added.

lw
 

Alchemist

New member
May 2, 2012
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And that right there is the beauty of individuality. I find doing any water extraction just with nibs rather lacking, but others like it just fine. To each his own. It is also very possible I am biased because of my chemestry background, and know that there is a lot of compounds being left behind and I am comparing what is in the cup to what is left behind.
 

eldub

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Mar 28, 2012
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So how do I get what is left behind by other than extracting with water?

scott
 

eldub

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Mar 28, 2012
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Just ordered another batch of nibs from your site. (D.R. Conacado)

To be honest, I have been lamenting the essence of cocoa left behind every time I throw away the brewed nibs after water extraction.

On the other hand, I've really been enjoying the 32 oz batches I've been making in the french press. The first cup is drank hot, the balance drank as iced cocoa after cooling and putting in fridge. (I add a bit of sugar to the hot brew to dissolve before chilling and then add a splash of milk before serving over ice.)
 

RichHelms

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May 14, 2012
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I add a dark chocolate hint by adding some East Timor beans. The East Timor beans have a strong dark chocolate note. By themself I found them too strong. At 20% they make a nice blend.
 
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