For real roasters

Temuri

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Nov 12, 2005
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Tbilisi Georgia
Please could you advise what is the best roasting style for Guatemala Huehuetenango? Do you use it as single origin or could you recomend a good mix with it? I could do nothing good with it. Very disapointed.
What can you tell me about Colombia Excelso, E.P., Tolima, Costa Rica SHB, TUJ San M. Tarrazu and Nicaraguan Matagalpa / Jinotega? These are new to me.
I roast popayan supremo and Cumbre Tarazu and like it, but now I have to buy something else. As about Nicaraguan coffee -- I have never tasted or roasted that.

Hope for some advice.

Temuri
 
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Temuri

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Nov 12, 2005
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Tbilisi Georgia
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I began only one month and a halfe ago with only five coffees. (Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Kenia, and Guatemala). All four coffees but Guatemala were hits, Brazil was good in blends but with Guatemala I could do nothing.
Now I have ordered (today) everything that I had (no Huehuetenango!!!!) and some new ones: Indonesian Java Blawan new crop Grade 1, Mexican Altura "La granja" Organic, Ethiopian Yirgamo (?! they told me it was a green blend of Sidamo and Yirgacheffe -- funny), and Dicaf Colombian.
I think you are proffesional and please let me have your opinion.

Temuri
 

ElPugDiablo

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Jul 16, 2004
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Hartford and New Haven, CT
I roast my Huehuetenango to just before second crack but beans are fully developed. When I dump the beans, I will have a few snaps but no more. But keep in mind, I am in an area where people like lighter roasting style.

The Nicaragua Jinotega I have is a little lower grown (1200 M) than Huehuetenango (1400 M), so the beans are a little softer. I find they are less acidic than other Central Americans, and I roast it a little darker than Huehuetenango.
 
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Temuri

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Nov 12, 2005
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Tbilisi Georgia
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Thanks, I'll try till second crack, let us see what we'll have. I liked your opinion about Nicaraguan, I think I shall buy it next time. I usually import my coffee from Germany and I gave already the order without this coffee in it. Anyway I shall have good choice for December.
 

Coffee Guy

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Oct 19, 2003
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Seattle,Washington USA
Hey Temuri:

Guats do blend well with Brazilians and most of you African coffees. It will all depend on the percentages you use. Guats are pretty close in taste to Colombians, so you stand the chance of cancelling them out if your percentages are amost equal. As for single origin, I would recommend more of a medium roast and dropping right around 15 minutes or so depending on the type of roaster you use. I use a Diedrich.
 
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Temuri

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Nov 12, 2005
98
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Tbilisi Georgia
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ElPugDiablo said:
I roast my Huehuetenango to just before second crack but beans are fully developed. When I dump the beans, I will have a few snaps but no more. But keep in mind, I am in an area where people like lighter roasting style.

The Nicaragua Jinotega I have is a little lower grown (1200 M) than Huehuetenango (1400 M), so the beans are a little softer. I find they are less acidic than other Central Americans, and I roast it a little darker than Huehuetenango.

You are a great guy ElPugDiablo! I roasted my huehuetenango just to second crack (ok really a few cracks only) and got very aromatic and light coffee. It has no more smokeness it had when darker roasted. I made it week's special and put 20 % discount on it to restore it's reputation. It had very nice feedback and got new loyal customers. I sell it at top price now, same as my firm blend and Kenya AA and I like it too.
My mistake was I was trying to roast it dark! this way it is much better.
 
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