Help! My designs don't flow :(

thatlucidguy

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Dec 24, 2013
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I finally managed to texture milk properly (i think)but I now have two issues.

1. When I pour into the back of the cup with the cup tilted a little, the milk immediately colors the coffee white a little bit. What's causing this?

2. When the white foam comes out towards the end of the pour, I wiggle my jug to create a Rosetta effect but it doesn't "flow" and instead it just lies where it falls. Advice?

I'm very new to this and using a home espresso machine with a steaming wand.
 

PinkRose

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Feb 28, 2008
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What kind of "jug" are you steaming in?

Have you watched any YouTube videos showing you how to steam/froth the milk and do the pour?

The foamed milk may be too thick. Keep on experimenting, and you'll find what works right for you.
 
Mar 31, 2011
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It sounds like your foam is being aerated too much. My general rule is to only introduce air for the first couple seconds of steaming. As soon as your milk starts to warm, you shouldn't be letting any more air in. The final texture of the milk needs to be silky not frothy. Try 3 quick air bursts at the beginning and then don't let the steam wand our of the milk after until it's at temp.
 

thatlucidguy

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Dec 24, 2013
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It sounds like your foam is being aerated too much. My general rule is to only introduce air for the first couple seconds of steaming. As soon as your milk starts to warm, you shouldn't be letting any more air in. The final texture of the milk needs to be silky not frothy. Try 3 quick air bursts at the beginning and then don't let the steam wand our of the milk after until it's at temp.

Thanks for the reply guys! Sorry I have not replied back. I think that I am introducing too much air. See, the problem is, is that ALL the tutorials I watch on youtube, use proper coffee shop type machines, my one is a cheap home machine which does the same job but differently. For example, the steam pressure is not that powerful (I think it's 19 bars or something) so when some tutorials say "Leave it for 5-10 seconds and you will feel it get warm" - this does not apply! So maybe I have been overcompensating.

Still trying though, thanks! Maybe I'll update if I make some progress. Not giving up ;)
 

CoffeeJunky

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Dec 7, 2012
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when you are using home espresso machine, its really hard to get decent cream to actually do latte art. Even with 300-500 machine, it gives very uneven result each time when you warm up your cream.
You should tweak alittle and see what happens. It took me awhile to get the consistent milk for latte art.
 
Mar 31, 2011
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Seattle, Wa
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Thanks for the reply guys! Sorry I have not replied back. I think that I am introducing too much air. See, the problem is, is that ALL the tutorials I watch on youtube, use proper coffee shop type machines, my one is a cheap home machine which does the same job but differently. For example, the steam pressure is not that powerful (I think it's 19 bars or something) so when some tutorials say "Leave it for 5-10 seconds and you will feel it get warm" - this does not apply! So maybe I have been overcompensating.

Still trying though, thanks! Maybe I'll update if I make some progress. Not giving up ;)
I'm not saying it's useless to try it on a cheap home machine but definitely you'll be less frustrated on a proper commercial machine. Although if you can perfect it on a home machine you can do it on ANY commercial one. The steam pressure makes a huge difference. As does the ability of the machine to pull a proper shot with decent crema
 
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