Hiring and Firing please help

RiverNile

New member
Sep 27, 2005
27
0
Keller, TX
Ok here is my situation.

They come fill an application, I find one or two that could fit, I interview, then all is well, I mention that I will call to let notify when to start.

So this girl starts working with us, for two days, then five days later, I call leave two messages about if she can work .........so far she did not call back at all, it has been more than 36 hours.

Second situation, I interview that guy, then I call him couple days later, to know if he can start tomorrow, I leave a message, now it has been a week, he has not called back.

The question is, what is the rule, or how many times I should call to give enough chance.

Your help is greatly appreciated.
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
874
0
Seattle,Washington USA
Hey R.N.:

It's obvious that neither wants a job. Remember you are the one offering a job opportunity not the other way around. You have a business to run, not a baby sitting service. In my opinion you have done all that you can. Move on to someone else who wants to work :wink:
 

Muddycup

New member
Dec 4, 2005
201
0
New York
another thing to do is be more agressive, when someone comes in looking for a job:

1. Fill out a application
2. If you like them (good intial feeling).
3. excuse your self and call a reference right away while they wait.
4. if everything seems ok (ofcourse you never know)
5. Then offer them a job right then.
6. After fully explaining the expectations of the Job (be straight forward)
(I even go as far as "don't ever call in sick" and don't ever steal from me")
7. They may accept the offer and at that point schedule thier first training day, usually as soon as possible.

There also maybe something wrong with your approch if people are coming in and looking for a job, get offered one and don't return. You may want to change your approach. Remember an employee is also interviewing you to see if you are likeable, the work enviroment is interesting and what the pay is like.
 

Muddycup

New member
Dec 4, 2005
201
0
New York
Well two of our stores run with one staff person on at any one time, so if they call in sick what do we do: This situation is explained to them ahead of time and it is up to them to take on the responsibility of their job.

Alot of employees are used to calling in sick for personal days (Make the schedule flexible, give them the schedule they request, allow the staff to work out their own schedule amonst them selves.

Teach employees infection control, on how to avoid getting sick

If you get a cold, load up on that cold medicine so you can get through the day.

We found when you give the right staff responsibility for their own job most will excell.
 

Mocha Psyc

New member
Feb 18, 2006
16
0
Over the Rainbow
Reminds me of the time I was on a business trip to Denver with my boss.

The plane lands at the Denver airport and my boss asks me if I plan on calling work to see what my staff is doing. I look him straight in the eye and say nope.

He asks why and I tell him that HE hired ME to run my department. If MY employees aren't doing THEIR job then I'm ultimately responsible - not them. I also add that if HE didn't believe I was the right choice for a staff supervisor, then HE shouldn't have hired ME.

My boss looks somewhat confused, then trots off to call the office to check up on HIS staff.

A couple of minutes later he comes back looking rather stupid and says, "You knew it was Sunday didn't you?"

"Yep - and I'm pretty sure MY staff is at home this weekend."

8)
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
874
0
Seattle,Washington USA
M.C.:

You are right regarding the interview techiques, however, I think in this case R.N. is past that stage. If I'm understanding the post correctly, these good for nothings had already had the gig, and they blew it. I don't give second chances in cases like this :evil: . Through the years I've learned from a number of mistakes, i.e., most people will put their best foot forward during an interview. But you really have to evaluate them after a few weeks to see if they stick with what they brought to the interview. Those that turn out to be the same after several weeks are usually the keepers, and those that don't you can see them faking and maybe it is time to part ways. With us for example, the prospects have to have an application filled out, if they have a resume, that's great, but we still have them fill out an application. We then give them a preinterview test to test their general knowledge of things like drink prep, general equipment operation and character type questions. While they are doing that, that is when we take the time to call their referrences. And believe me we always call referrences. It generally takes them about 10 minutes to do the test, and that usually gives us enough time to call at least a couple of their referrences. But that's just how we do it. Maybe some others may have something to share as well... :wink:
 

Night Guy

New member
Jan 28, 2006
52
0
Winnipeg manitoba Ca.
Never give second chances to people the you basically don't know. For them not returning your calls just shows you what kind of people they are and do you want them working for you in the first place. Good riddens to them now before they hang you out to dry one day down the road. :evil:
 

MontanaMama

New member
Mar 10, 2006
49
0
Night Guy said:
Never give second chances to people the you basically don't know. For them not returning your calls just shows you what kind of people they are and do you want them working for you in the first place. Good riddens to them now before they hang you out to dry one day down the road. :evil:[/quote

My thoughts exactily. :)

re: the "don't get sick" thing..........thats really unrealistic, IMO. People get sick, doesn't matter sometimes how much hand washing and covering their mouths and noses with a tissue they do. You actually want them in the shop serving customers with a fever and/or sneezing? How about the flu?
 

paulys

New member
Feb 20, 2006
11
0
hamilton, NJ
I've got a rental property, and some of the things i learned from interviewing prospective tenants i think are appropriate here.

-the first step is the initial interview, either on the phone or in person. take note of everything and trust your instincts.

once you have the inperson interview, note the following things:
-appearance, car, attitude and manners, ability to accept job or wanting to think about it.

*Do background checks, call references, etc. don't always judge a book by it's cover.
I had a prospective tenant who looked and sounded perfect, ran his credit and he had 7 credit cards all past 90 days due...

once hired set a time and place for them to come fill out paperwork, get uniform, etc., separate from their first day. this is a test for them, give them some specific time, date, etc and see how they act. if they can't make it to this on time, will they make it to work ontime?

I'm actually in the hiring process for my shop now (opening in april)...
There have been a few that have come to the store while it looks like a warzone asking me about a job and what the store will look like, etc... they keep coming back to check the progress and talk with me, this is a good sign.
 

Muddycup

New member
Dec 4, 2005
201
0
New York
it is hard to explain my hiring system on this forum, its how we treat and pay our employees.

1. we still have our very first employee who still fills in for us after 5 years
2. we have very little turn over
3. we have a waiting list of people who want to work at our shops

We have an entire system in place on how we creat a great working enviroment for our staff. I will be memorializing all our staff procedures in the next couple of months for all to read.
 

morrisn

New member
Mar 27, 2006
126
0
Hiring

The one thing we do when we find a good potential employee is schedule a working interview on the spot. Usually a 2 to 4 hour shift that allows us to see what they can do and also gives them a chance to see if that is what they want to do
 

Rockcreekcoffee

New member
Dec 8, 2004
39
0
Billings, MT
Hiring/Firing

Hiring potential barista's has alot to do with "your gut feeling". Now that derives from:

1. How they present themselves
2. Their answers to the questions you ask them

We have hired people with previous experience and more times than not, it doesn't work out... They usually come in with alot of bad habits.

I most importantly look to see if they have worked in the service industry (bartender, waiter/waitress etc..) If they have the skills to "serve" - you can teach them to make a latte etc. You can't teach people "customer service" either they haven't or they don't.

Rockcreekcoffee
 

JP

New member
Mar 23, 2004
8
0
Since this thread is about firing too.

I have a new shop and a new barista, who worked as a barista for one year about 5 years ago. She's been w/ me for almost two weeks.

She's very good w/ people, but forgetful of many small tasks. She may be getting better at some things. She's also very social. A few minutes ago, I a friend of hers came in and they were talking on the customer side of the bar. I was behind the bar and took her friend's order and then made the drink. We were pretty dead at the time. She then spent about 5 minutes talking w/ her friend after I delivered the drink.

I just don't feel an employee should ever let an owner/manager do their job while they socialize. Your thoughts?

BTW, I'm not too knowledgeable on the managerial thing.

Thanks.
John
 

JP

New member
Mar 23, 2004
8
0
Don't know how to edit my previous post.

As I finished my last post, I noticed the same employee with a calculator and my receipts at the register.

I don't know if she's working out her tips or what.

She's on lunch now. Think it's time to talk after.

Would appreciate your input.

Thanks.
 

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