How do you get a French press to "resist" when you

Frihed89

New member
Dec 2, 2007
32
0
Copenhagen
plunger down?

With me, it's hit or miss. Sometimes it slides down like butter; sometimes there is a lot of resistance, which I assume is good

What matters?
How much coffee you use?
Am I filling it too close to the top?
How do you make a good seal? Is there a trick

I am dumbfounded: too many variables
 

equus007

New member
Apr 4, 2006
315
0
Austin, Tx
probably due to differences in grind size. Too fine and it makes a cookie like an espresso machine does and it wont flow through.

I like a little resistance but too much makes me wake up and ruins the whole morning. Once again women and coffee resemble each other. :evil:
 

MikeG

New member
Dec 22, 2007
2
0
Re: How do you get a French press to \"resist\" wh

[quote:2e19471e01=\"Frihed89\"]
What matters?
How much coffee you use?
Am I filling it too close to the top?
How do you make a good seal? Is there a trick
[/quote:2e19471e01]

Grind your coffee coarser and/or get a grinder that produces more consistent grinds. Now use as much coffee as you prefer.
 

davidsbiscotti

New member
Oct 4, 2007
338
0
When hot water is poured into the glass beaker, there is an uneven increase in the thermal expansion of the walls of the vessel.
I've noticed the varying resistance in mine as well.
C'est la vie.
 

davidsbiscotti

New member
Oct 4, 2007
338
0
I'm at a loss now.......

Last night I tried the Illy immediate plunge method with my caffetiere.
I plunged (hoping not to crack the glass beaker) just after pouring the almost boiling
water into the grounds and stirring.

The resistance was worthy of the French Maquis of WWII !!! :D

Anyway, if heat causes glass to expand, why did the resistance increase?????
Normally I get the "like butter" plunge effect after waiting
a few minutes before plunging.

:? :? :?
 

Carmine Domenaco

New member
Oct 10, 2007
31
0
coffee freshness plays a role, old coffee no resistance fresh coffee harder plunge.

I am also convinced that barometric pressure plays a role but I have no science to back my practical experience.
 

davidsbiscotti

New member
Oct 4, 2007
338
0
Yes, barometric pressure.

The trapped steam provided an increase in pressure (more resistance).
When waiting a few minutes, after the steam has dissipated, there's more of a vacuum effect.

Isn't this the basis for technologies such as steam engines?
 

3ternal

New member
Mar 22, 2007
126
0
Seattle, WA
Make sure your using enough coffee first of all. Second make sure your using a good grind, French press requires a much coarser grind than drip coffee. I also make sure to stir the coffee into the water as soon as I fill up the pitcher, so there's already a thin layer of crema at the top. After 4-5 minutes, slowly press down... it should get harder the farther down you get.

If you followed all the above steps and dont have a layer of crema resembling a shot of espresso; you either did something wrong or your coffee's stale.

And I think the pressure is caused by lack of space for the water to get through as your plunger picks up coffee, the more coffee blocking the filter the less that can get through. But, then again I'm a barista not a physics major :)
 

Latest posts

Top