Is there an easier/automated device to heat non-dairy milk, instead of hand stirring on my gas stove pan?

jimtmcdaniels

New member
Oct 5, 2021
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Colo Spgs CO USA
Hi, looking for advice/experience in finding an easier/automated device to heat pea(or other non-dairy) milk when making my coffee.

I do have a home expresso machine with a steaming wand to heat milk.
However, it is time consuming and noisy and takes filling with steam water and can be messy.

So I find it easier, with what I have at the home, to just heat the pea milk in a ceramic coated cast iron pan on the gas stove top.
But it requires constant stirring and monitoring, it really is a delicate chore that too often results in scorching and throwing the milk away and a chore to clean the pan bottom out.

In the past I did purchase a home use cappuccino foam/froth machine that had a heating element and magnetic spinning spring disc at the bottom.
But, In spite of its very good reviews on Amazon, it's performance was ridiculously weak and disappointing...
It did not heat sufficiently at all and of course didn't produce a froth or even a foam since I do not use dairy milk because of my sensitivity to dairy milk. I would have been happy if it had heated the milk well but it did not.

Also the thing is, I use to work in a greek restaurant many years ago and they had a machine that would heat heat milk to perfection, using spinning stirring paddles at the bottom and good heating elements...
I would love to find such a device for home use but I just don't see it in my searches using the keywords "milk foamer/frother".
All the machines appear to be the same disappointing design I already tried from Amazon.
I am leary to try another machine with the same weak magnet spinner.

Any helpful suggestions to my dilemma?

Thank-you!
Jim
 
S

SmallFry

Guest
Hi, looking for advice/experience in finding an easier/automated device to heat pea(or other non-dairy) milk when making my coffee.

I do have a home expresso machine with a steaming wand to heat milk.
However, it is time consuming and noisy and takes filling with steam water and can be messy.

So I find it easier, with what I have at the home, to just heat the pea milk in a ceramic coated cast iron pan on the gas stove top.
But it requires constant stirring and monitoring, it really is a delicate chore that too often results in scorching and throwing the milk away and a chore to clean the pan bottom out.

In the past I did purchase a home use cappuccino foam/froth machine that had a heating element and magnetic spinning spring disc at the bottom.
But, In spite of its very good reviews on Amazon, it's performance was ridiculously weak and disappointing...
It did not heat sufficiently at all and of course didn't produce a froth or even a foam since I do not use dairy milk because of my sensitivity to dairy milk. I would have been happy if it had heated the milk well but it did not.

Also the thing is, I use to work in a greek restaurant many years ago and they had a machine that would heat heat milk to perfection, using spinning stirring paddles at the bottom and good heating elements...
I would love to find such a device for home use but I just don't see it in my searches using the keywords "milk foamer/frother".
All the machines appear to be the same disappointing design I already tried from Amazon.
I am leary to try another machine with the same weak magnet spinner.

Any helpful suggestions to my dilemma?

Thank-you!
Jim
Maybe...

I have only done this with dairy milk. But I have found it to be quicker than using the Delonghi frother, which I own. It's not at all automated, however.

I have a small wire whisk about 6" in length and about 1 1/2" in diameter at the business end. It fits into a small coffee cup with a bit of room to spare.

I microwave heat the milk in my cup, then I rapidly spin the whisk. back and forth between the palms of my hands. (Reciprocating action.)

My 2% MF dairy milk froths up fairly nicely. It takes a bit of time to eliminate large bubbles, but not ages. This is not finely textured milk for making latte art, but it's suitable for a cappuccino. It holds together for a reasonable amount of time. I pour my espresso shot into the cup of frothy milk, not vice-versa.

Perhaps this will get you where you want to go. More than that, I cannot say.
 
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