OK I know the word "Robusta" will start a war but.

Baugo

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I have been reading about Robusta in "Roast Magazine" and other articles on there crema, caffeine and yes bad taste. If, I were to use this in an espresso blend, would I roast it separately and then blend or blend then roast? If roasting separately, what kind of profile would one use to achieve the blend? How about a, “Indian Robusta Cherry AB” for this application, or a different Robusta? Anyone dare to start this one up? LOL
 

Temuri

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Nov 12, 2005
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Tbilisi Georgia
Re: OK I know the word "Robusta" will start a war

Baugo said:
I have been reading about Robusta in "Roast Magazine" and other articles on there crema, caffeine and yes bad taste. If, I were to use this in an espresso blend, would I roast it separately and then blend or blend then roast? If roasting separately, what kind of profile would one use to achieve the blend? How about a, “Indian Robusta Cherry AB” for this application, or a different Robusta? Anyone dare to start this one up? LOL
I hate all robustas, but I roast them. I never use it in any normal blend. If you think you need it, you can use Parchment AB for espresso.
Good luck!
 

Coffee Guy

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Depending on the rosbusta and the amount you plan to use especially for espresso can be quite good. I would recommend that you do a search and find a few places that produce robustas, have them send some samples and blend a few with single origins and then cup them. I've found that through the years that there are a few good ones out here now. I have found some Indian Estate Roubustas out here that taste great when blended with Colombian and Brazils that have a wonderful balance...Give that a shot :D
 

ElPugDiablo

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I just roasted a sample of Indian robusta, I put it into my espresso so it is about 8% of the blend and so far the result is an improvement. I did not detect any of the rubbery medicinal taste that most robusta have. Instead it added a nice milk chocolate and nutty taste to it. I will play with it a bit more, if I can get consistent result, then I will use it.

I have always thought that robusta are low density beans, but this sample is very dense, right up there with Kenya. Since I don't use enough to do a batch by itself, I am thinking of roasting it with one of the harder beans that I also use in the blend.

By the way, in my case, I have found it likes lower water temperature extraction, given the fact that most Italian roasters use quite a bit of robusta, maybe that explain why most espresso machine's factory setting is around 190F, while some US roasters like to use higher temp in the 200F+ area.
 

Coffee Guy

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Good point El D...Most out here don't realize that alot of the Italian blends are made up of a higher concentration of robustas than alot of us here in the U.S. and there have been a lot of good robustas coming out within the last few years. I myself use between 8%-10% in some of my espresso blends. They do add a nice body and great cremma to a good shot. :wink:
 
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Baugo

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Thanks guys, On my next shipment I will have some Indian Monsooned Malabar. I expect great things. :grin:
 

topher

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careful with the Monsooned Malabar...its going to roast differently. There is hardly any moisture in those beans. When you are roasting you need to pay close attention at the end of the roast...it will come together right near the end of your roast :wink:
 

ElPugDiablo

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How do you roast and use Monsooned Malabar? I tried it a few times in straight espresso, always got that funky saltiness. I like the taste of aged Sumatra better, but that is pricey, and I have no experience roasting that either.
 
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Baugo

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Hey Topher for me starting out, is there another robusta I should be looking at instead? I am only ordering 5lbs as a test. I have not done the Robusta/espresso plunge yet but figured it was a good idea to go small at first for testing. I will use about a 10% I.M.M 50%colombian or Brazil and 40% S. Mandheling. Maybe 50%Colo, and 40% Brazil. But I do like the S.Man :!: Any suggestions?
 
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Baugo

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Its not about the price. Its about the balance. I am told that if done right you will end up with a great espresso. But I suppose, if you never try you'll never know. So I choose to find out. As I have said before, I am a hands on kind of guy and I never sit in the back. And I NEVER EVER like the word CHEAP it just sounds hillbilly.
 

Temuri

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Baugo said:
Its not about the price. Its about the balance. I am told that if done right you will end up with a great espresso. But I suppose, if you never try you'll never know. So I choose to find out. As I have said before, I am a hands on kind of guy and I never sit in the back. And I NEVER EVER like the word CHEAP it just sounds hillbilly.
I continue to import about 450 bags (nine hundred 60 kg bags in two months) of robusta every month. So I have tried and keep trying it. :) :grin: .
Anyway I believe that the story that robusta is a must in a good (or perfect) cup of espresso is nothing more then the following:
Big international companys try to compete in prices and "teach" the customers why "cheap" is better. Of course it would be much comfortable and easy for them to use expensive arabica, but they are customer focused and work a lot to find the ways how to make from cheap beans the best. :grin: Shortly it is like gaseous powder! :D :D :D :lol: :)
 

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