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garyscottadamson

New member
Apr 8, 2007
60
0
UK
I'm selling small quantities of coffee, which I've roasted myself.

When coffee is roasted, you're meant to wait 2 days before cupping it right?

If I roast coffee and grind it right away(before it's ready to be cupped), will anything bad happen too the coffee?

would it be better to wait 2 days before grinding the coffee?

also, should I realy be selling coffee, if I don't realy fully understand it it?

thanks
gary
 

Davec

New member
Oct 18, 2006
314
0
Old England (UK)
garyscottadamson said:
1. When coffee is roasted, you're meant to wait 2 days before cupping it right?
2. If I roast coffee and grind it right away(before it's ready to be cupped), will anything bad happen too the coffee?
3. would it be better to wait 2 days before grinding the coffee?
4. also, should I realy be selling coffee, if I don't realy fully understand it it?

1. Not really, it depends why your cupping it. If your cupping for defects, you will use a different roast level compared to the roast you would use if you were going to drink it.

2. Coffee should be used as soon as possible after its ground (a few minutes)

3. See 1, but if it's coffee for drinking and your going to sample it in drinks, wait at least 3 days, then try it over the next week or more to see how the flavour develops over time..

4. I suppose not, but then you will not be alone.
 

ElPugDiablo

New member
Jul 16, 2004
991
0
Hartford and New Haven, CT
garyscottadamson said:
1. When coffee is roasted, you're meant to wait 2 days before cupping it right?
2. If I roast coffee and grind it right away(before it's ready to be cupped), will anything bad happen too the coffee?
3. would it be better to wait 2 days before grinding the coffee?
4. also, should I realy be selling coffee, if I don't realy fully understand it it?

Davec said:
1. Not really, it depends why your cupping it. If your cupping for defects, you will use a different roast level compared to the roast you would use if you were going to drink it.
Would your grind and cup for defects immediately after roast? I usually rest my for at least 8 hours.

Davec said:
2. Coffee should be used as soon as possible after its ground (a few minutes)
For drip coffee, this is not necessary correct. There are some discussions in coffeed.com and in home-barista.com regarding pre-grinding up to 12 hours before brewing produce a superior cup of coffee. This is recently mentioned in a book written by Scott Rao, The Professional Barista's Handbook, Scott is an all around coffee and tea fanatic and someone whom I am proud to call my friend.
 
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G

garyscottadamson

New member
Apr 8, 2007
60
0
UK
  • Thread Starter
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the idea of waiting 12 hours after grinding, sounds crazy and I would have probably advised people against it.

I'm open to anything though. I shall give it a try.
 

roaster dave

New member
Aug 6, 2008
38
0
Guelph, Ontario
garyscottadamson said:
the idea of waiting 12 hours after grinding, sounds crazy and I would have probably advised people against it.

I'd agree. Once ground, the amount of surface area exposed increases the rate of staling 10 fold. The idea of waiting on a fresh roasted batch of coffee is to allow the coffee to off gas slightly to eliminate bloom in the basket.
 

JohnB

New member
May 30, 2008
113
0
Connecticut
roaster dave said:
I'd agree. Once ground, the amount of surface area exposed increases the rate of staling 10 fold. The idea of waiting on a fresh roasted batch of coffee is to allow the coffee to off gas slightly to eliminate bloom in the basket.

Its also to allow the roasted beans to age until they hit peak flavor. Many commercially roasted Espresso blends don't taste their best until the second week. Intelligentsia recommends not even opening the bag until its Black Cat Espresso has aged 8-10 days. I don't try to pull shots with anything I buy until at least 3 days after roast.
 

caffe biscotto

New member
Jan 18, 2008
704
0
MASS.
From what I've experienced, grinding several days or so after the roast date provides the best, full flavored coffee. If I'm over excited about trying a new coffee, I may grind and brew sooner, but of course as the week goes on, the coffee just keeps getting better, grind after grind...

I usually grind coffee beans the night before brewing. :D
 

Davec

New member
Oct 18, 2006
314
0
Old England (UK)
ElPugDiablo said:
garyscottadamson said:
1. When coffee is roasted, you're meant to wait 2 days before cupping it right?

Davec said:
1. Not really, it depends why your cupping it. If your cupping for defects, you will use a different roast level compared to the roast you would use if you were going to drink it.
Would your grind and cup for defects immediately after roast? I usually rest my for at least 8 hours.

Davec said:
2. Coffee should be used as soon as possible after its ground (a few minutes)
For drip coffee, this is not necessary correct. There are some discussions in coffeed.com and in home-barista.com regarding pre-grinding up to 12 hours before brewing produce a superior cup of coffee. This is recently mentioned in a book written by Scott Rao, The Professional Barista's Handbook, Scott is an all around coffee and tea fanatic and someone whom I am proud to call my friend.

I would be happy to try it after a few hours if cupping for defects....

As for grinding drip coffee 12 hours before use to produce a superior cup of coffee...Over 30 years it has not been my personal experience that this improves either drip coffee or french press. Perhaps though it depends on the specific coffee being used and may indicate that I lack good sensory skills? I also admit to not having done this for a very long time (in my youth I used to grind up a whole batch of coffee to use in the drip maker over the next few days though :shock: ).

Either way, a new roaster has a few ideas to try now in his search for those perfect roast profiles and blends.
 
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