The role of the artisan coffee shop

John P

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It begins and ends with the quality you serve to your customers.

"Customer Service is a coffee first decision."

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/educate-elevate-role-artisan-coffee-shop-john-piquet


Educate and Elevate! The role of the artisan coffee shop




Customer service is about quality and care, not convenience. Customer service is about education, not platitudes. Ultimately, the customer is best served by delivering them the best product possible, and seeking to improve upon both product and experience each day. When you put the coffee first, you put the customer's coffee experience first.
Customer service is a coffee first decision.



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Sadly, there are those who fail to take a leadership role and opt for convenience and platitudes. Theirs is the world of pre-ground coffee and smiles. Of duping the uneducated customer into paying for product that is rapidly declining by the second. Convenience in order to make a sale is patronizing the customer rather than serving the customer. The best way to serve the customer is to provide them the best tools and education to continue their coffee experience at home. That is why an artisan coffee shop should only sell fresh, properly roasted whole bean.


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Once you take the role of an artisan coffee maker, excellence is more than a set of words, it's a set of actions. The artisan coffee provider has an obligation beyond the average coffee shop, an obligation to educate the customer to help them elevate their own coffee experience. The customer looks to the coffee shop owner, to the barista for guidance. To outwardly speak of cultivars, sourcing, brew ratios, and craft, and then sell the customer ground coffee demonstrates a calculated facade. When a customer comes to buy coffee to take home, the care for the coffee does not end in the coffee shop, it begins at the grinder in the customer's home.

if you enjoyed this post, you might enjoy my blog.




 
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John P

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I've updated so this posted here locally for those who don't use Linkedin. This is one of the most important concepts to keep in mind as a coffee professional. It is about having respect for the ingredients, and respect for the craft. If the industry wants to be taken seriously in terms of good wine, craft beer, spirits, or any culinary endeavor, then roasters, barista, etc,. need to take what they do seriously. Of course not everyone in those industries holds themselves to a high standard, but as a comparison, what goes on in our industry in terms of acceptable quality standards is frightening. Why and how does this happen? Let me illustrate with another business. Start with no professional cooking experience. Buy a Viking range and a good set of knives. Cook at home for 9 months. Now open a restaurant and call yourself a chef. Ridiculous, isn't it?
 

bstcups

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I've updated so this posted here locally for those who don't use Linkedin. This is one of the most important concepts to keep in mind as a coffee professional. It is about having respect for the ingredients, and respect for the craft. If the industry wants to be taken seriously in terms of good wine, craft beer, spirits, or any culinary endeavor, then roasters, barista, etc,. need to take what they do seriously. Of course not everyone in those industries holds themselves to a high standard, but as a comparison, what goes on in our industry in terms of acceptable quality standards is frightening. Why and how does this happen? Let me illustrate with another business. Start with no professional cooking experience. Buy a Viking range and a good set of knives. Cook at home for 9 months. Now open a restaurant and call yourself a chef. Ridiculous, isn't it?

Awesome, it's looks great!!
 

John P

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While the "comments" are nice, I would expect some dialogue rather than just trying to inject oneself into a posting. It was a serious post. Contribute something.
How about reading, thinking, and then responding? That would be "really awesome!" :coffee:
 

coffee771

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I completely agree. However, we have created a world where convenience and speed are the top priorities. This is seen by many people choosing to go to the big brand coffee shops, where customer service is lacking and the quality of coffee is horrible. Instead, they could be having a quality cup coffee that can usually be found at a local coffee shop. My own personal experience has been that these artisan coffee shops have friendlier people that are more likely to answer any questions that you have.
 

John P

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coffee771,

Sad. True. But consumers looking for quality DO expect that their is a sacrifice over convenience. And in return, they will get more engaged, informative, and honest service. And simply a better product in the end.

The bigger issue is the places that have all the trappings of high-end, but ... It's not just a matter of whether you are creating a convenience or not, but it's a direct reflection of one's ethics and respect for ingredients as an artisan shop owner. Coffee of convenience is a completely different thing. If there are any statements, marketing or positioning of one's coffee shop or roastery as specialty, high-end, quality, Third-Wave, craft, artisan -- what have you, then it your responsibility as an owner to hold yourself to that standard, especially when it is the foundation (making, serving, selling coffee) of everything we do.

There's a reason why David Schomer is David Schomer.
 

MmmmCoffee

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I love this posting. You are absolutely right about the role of the artisan coffee shop. Especially this day in age. I feel like something was lost with Generation X. That was the generation of "I want it quick, and I want it now". I feel that the generation before us built relationships with the people that they gave their money to. There was a common respect. The business owner knew exactly what his client would order regularly, knew his name, his kids names, what he did for a living...it was almost a family relationship. Even today's millennials, they are more socially conscious and aware than any generations preceding them. They never lived a life without the internet and instant gratification, therefore, they are much like the older generations that is craving that individuality that Generation X willingly gave up. They desire to be known and recognized in the crowd. They realize that Starbucks is the place to go to be anonymous. That is why what you do is so important.

If you can find a way to build a relationship with every single customer that walks in your doors, you will find that your loyal client base will grow, and will keep you in business and thriving for a long time to come.

If you are interested in learning more about how to accomplish this, I would be happy to share ideas with you. Feel free to message me privately.
 
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JeffD

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All those words about the role of an artisan coffee shop are used to justify higher prices to customers. You have to educate and convince the customer that all that stuff matters and it is worth paying a bit extra for. You have to make them feel not only are they getting something expertly made, delicious, and made with skilled hands, but they are saving the planet, and that drinking artisan coffee makes you special. Part of a special breed of person that appreciates the rare beauty and excellence that most people ignore and also cares more.

The reality is for most people you can get good enough for most people coffee right around the corner at the drive through. And for most people good enough is good enough. And look at those donuts!

The a buggy whip made of the finest sources leathers, weaved together by artisans three generations deep in buggy whip making, doesn't change the fact that nobody wants a buggy whip. Making it hard to charge much for it.

How much more will you pay for a pizza that you can watch being made by imported hands. :)
 
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JeffD

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You are not selling coffee, you are selling a dream, of being a contributor to world salvation, of being cool and respected, of being sexy and attractive because of how much you care.

I would spend a little more for coffee that tastes better sure. But I might spend a lot more if it made me a rare person, a man you don't meet every day, cool and popular, shaken not stirred. :)
 

John P

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You are not selling coffee, you are selling a dream, of being a contributor to world salvation, of being cool and respected, of being sexy and attractive because of how much you care.

I would spend a little more for coffee that tastes better sure. But I might spend a lot more if it made me a rare person, a man you don't meet every day, cool and popular, shaken not stirred. :)
You're a little late to the party on this six and a half year old thread. 😅😅
 

John P

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:LOL: Yea well, I just read the posts and saw how absolutely right every one thought you were. I was compelled to say something.
I was right then. I am right now.

For two decades, my shop has been a results based proving ground for my skill and expertise. There's a reason why people who love exceptional culinary things - like wine makers, Michelin Star Chefs, and coffee professionals travel across the country and across the world to find me.

Here's a few of the most recent.



 
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