TJ-067 Roaster Review

Jan 21, 2015
8
0
California
I was asked to share my experience, as an owner, with the TJ-067 roaster. So a while back I spent several months reviewing roasters so I could purchase my first commercial roaster. I just needed a small roaster as I'm not roasting two or three hundred pounds a day so I scoured the internet to find a great roaster at a reasonable price. I noticed most 1k roasters were $5,000-$6,000 and up and they all offered nearly the exact same options and features. I however was working on a tight budget and quality used equipment is hard to come by. I happened to come across a forum that listed a number of small roasters and the TJ-067 was one of them. I began looking at the roaster, it was made in China so I had a few reservations but kept looking at it. There isn't a lot out there on this roaster but I found some Chinese websites I was able to translate and find more details on it. When I contacted the company they referred me to their US rep, Mill City Roasters. When I called, Steve was able to answer the multitude of questions I threw at him and so I decided to take the plunge. For me the selling point was the price, and the few user reviews I was able to find were all stellar.
Now that I've had this roaster for just over a month I've thrown about 25 pounds of coffee through it. I have the gas fired model and am using propane to power my flame. The option is available, however, to use natural gas instead which I find is a huge plus. I am having the roaster installed in a commercial kitchen and will be able to run an existing gas line to the roaster, never having to worry about refilling propane tanks again.
This roaster is built like a tank. When it arrived the crate had been run through with a fork lift fork, right into the body of the roaster and there was barely so much as a scratch on the machine. I used about 10 pounds of coffee to season the roaster before running a real batch through. Since, I've roasted an additional seven or eight 1k batches for consumption and they have been spectacular. The roaster runs so quietly that I can hear first and second crack from across the room which only helps to turn out quality, consistent batches with this machine. This roaster also roasts as much as it boasts. Most other reviews I read on comparable roasters recommend running under the listed batch size. You can probably run almost 1.5k per batch in this and still have great results (although I haven't tried). My roasts consistently complete between 12-14 minutes depending on the level of roast, and the results are always great! This is a fully manual roaster, so you can't hook up to a computer and just hit go for a profile, but the control you have over each aspect of the roaster, and therefore the roast, are great! The gas control allows precise control of your gas flow, the exhaust fan speed is adjustable (in percentage), and the variable drum speed has helped avoid inconsistent roasting within batches. This roaster also came with a phidget 1048 and thermocouple to allow data logging with a computer which has been invaluable.
Overall this has been a great roaster which has been able to produce great coffee in any roast profile. It has been nearly impossible to screw up a batch of coffee with this machine. The price is excellent and the customer service I have received from Mill City Roasters has been second to none. I highly recommend this roaster to any home roasting enthusiast, or as a shop roaster, or sample roaster for commercial operation.
I hope this review helps anyone who is on the hunt for a great roaster at a great price.

TJ-067
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,219
6
Near Philadelphia, PA
Hello Cornerstone_Roasters,

Welcome! Your first post on the Coffee Forum was a very detailed one!

I hope you'll visit us often and that you'll contribute to the discussions from time to time.

Rose
 

mirsad

New member
Jan 6, 2015
4
0
I am in the coffee roaster market and this review is helpful. Thank you! I have couple of questions and hope that someone could help with the answers. What is the primary decision maker to go with gas/propane and electric powered roaster? How do you calculate TJ-067 (1kg) roasters propane consumption per batch? Do you have this data available? Did you have to have a gas company professional come in and install the machine for you? Sorry for all the questions...I am just trying to learn as much as I can.

Mirsad
 

CoffeeJunky

New member
Dec 7, 2012
1,802
0
Michigan, US
Normally, Electric roasters are under powered. If you are a home roaster, it really doesn't matter but if you are going roast professionally, you should get Gas roaster. Also, most of the people use retrofit connector to connect your gas to your roaster. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, you should get a plummer to install that part. It won't cost much.
 

chast

New member
Jul 30, 2006
659
0
MA
is there a Natural gas conversion kit? You cannot take a unit that is setup for propane and run natural gas through it. orifices are different.
 

chast

New member
Jul 30, 2006
659
0
MA
My only reason for the question was another person purchased a small roaster and was told he could use NG or propane. He thought he could just hitch up either without doing anything,
 
OP
C
Jan 21, 2015
8
0
California
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #8
Mirsad, each gallon of propane equals 91,450 BTU's so if you know the BTU output of your roaster you can calculate out the consumption. If you don't know your BTU's you can weigh your propane tank before and after a roast. A gallon of propane weighs 4.25 pounds, then you can calculate your propane use by weight. On each propane cylinder is listed the tare weight. To keep an eye on your remaining propane weigh the tank and subtract the tare weight. use the 4.25#/Gallon and you can figure out how many gallons you have left. Hope this helps. And like MCR_Steve said, when he shipped me the roaster it came with the adapters needed to convert to NG. He's also happy to take calls and walk you through the conversion process. Great customer service.
 

mirsad

New member
Jan 6, 2015
4
0
Mirsad, each gallon of propane equals 91,450 BTU's so if you know the BTU output of your roaster you can calculate out the consumption. If you don't know your BTU's you can weigh your propane tank before and after a roast. A gallon of propane weighs 4.25 pounds, then you can calculate your propane use by weight. On each propane cylinder is listed the tare weight. To keep an eye on your remaining propane weigh the tank and subtract the tare weight. use the 4.25#/Gallon and you can figure out how many gallons you have left. Hope this helps. And like MCR_Steve said, when he shipped me the roaster it came with the adapters needed to convert to NG. He's also happy to take calls and walk you through the conversion process. Great customer service.

Thank you Cornerstone_Roasters! The TJ-067 roaster specifies 30,000 BTU. Does that mean it utilizes 30,000 BTU per hour..per batch or something else?
 

MillCityRoasters

New member
Jun 25, 2014
104
0
Minneapolis, MN
Thank you Cornerstone_Roasters! The TJ-067 roaster specifies 30,000 BTU. Does that mean it utilizes 30,000 BTU per hour..per batch or something else?

The TJ-067 can ramp up to an estimated (orifice size x gas pressure) 30,000 BTU/hr at 6 kpa of gas pressure. This is more than is needed to roast a 1500 gram charge profiled any way you want.
 

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