What are typical pay ranges???

geburton

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Apr 1, 2004
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I'm working on a business plan and I need to know what the typical titles and pay ranges are for coffee house employees, including any bonuses or incentives, benefits, etc.

The location is a medium sized city be in the mid-west, and I plan to have a tip jar for the baristas.

Thanks in Advance!
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
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Seattle,Washington USA
Hi grburton:

Start up for any employee pay is up to you. We usually start them off at minimum wage, plus whatever tips they make. Most baristas earn most of their extra income from tips. Bonuses and incentives would be based on how much they increase your business. You can't afford to offer these if you business is not making money. Are you currently working another job yourself? If so, use your job as a model when it comes to answering questions like, benefits, etc.
 

topher

Super Moderator
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Aug 14, 2003
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Boca Raton
If you are looking for a roaster...we make an average of $200,000 if you want I can start tomorrow :p
 
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geburton

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Apr 1, 2004
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  • Thread Starter
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topher said:
If you are looking for a roaster...we make an average of $200,000 if you want I can start tomorrow :p

$200,000 per year... I'm definitely rewriting my business plan.
 

Coffee Guy

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Oct 19, 2003
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Seattle,Washington USA
I understand your point E.O., I was using our operation as an example. However, our situation is different than most. We are in a high traffic area and therefor can offer our employees minimum wage, and their tips are good. Since things have not quite taken off yet in other parts of the nation, your approach regarding pay may be more suited until the business can support itself, then new hires could start at minimum wage.
 

topher

Super Moderator
Staff member
Aug 14, 2003
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Boca Raton
Like coffee guys says...it all depends where you are and what can you get away with...the last place I was....we paid $7.75 plus tips...and they averaged over $20 per 8 hour shift..but we where high volume.
 

janie1963

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Mar 8, 2004
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I'm really surprised. I'm in a small town with several espresso operations and the word is that they make about $60 per shift and on holidays weekends $20-30 more. I've heard them complain, "it was slooooow today I only made $65 in tips"!

I plan to start my personnel at minimum wage, although there is one girl I'd really like to lure from another place and I was thinking I might offer her a bit more. Not sure about that yet since we are just getting started and I think she'll be happy just to get more hours thatn where shes at now. If business goes well, I plan to implement a bonus program....increase your shift sales get a cash bonus.
 

GoodCoffee

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Apr 4, 2004
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Tips VS Wages

I am currenly working at a local coffee Roaster in oregon, and the staff here is only being paid minimum wage. Because of this there is a massive staff turnover! :cry:
Tips are good because they show that the customer likes the service...but wages are more important as they show that the owner appreciates the Barista's work. I would recommend paying above minimum wage to decrease staff turnover. A happy staff is a productive staff!
 

Coffee Guy

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Oct 19, 2003
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Seattle,Washington USA
Let's remember first and foremost this is a business. As an owner you must make money. I can't speak for everyone out there but most baristas are younger, and most don't stick around to make it a career. Therefore, I can't see paying anything more than minimum wage, except for someone you may want to manage your location, whereby they are responsible for the operations of the location including, ordering weekly supplies, compiling the paperwork, making deposits, and sometimes holding employee meetings. If the employee takes pride in what they are doing, it will show. Owners (if fair) will reward by offering higher pay after a certain period of time, bonuses, etc. But to assume that one can walk in the door and receive more is not realistic. At our place we don't consider someone a "Barista" until they have at least 1 year experience in drink prep, basic equipment ops, including being able to know basic troubleshooting, customer service skills, and basic management knowledge (knowing managers job) to fill in in case manager is on vacation, or if promoted. If they continue to make themselves better and not assume that they know everything after being trained once, they have a better chance to grow, and will appreciate what it takes to become successful. Maybe in the future even open their own location with the necessary skills to be successful. We've done just that with a few of our ex employees, and today they see why we insisted on the way things were.

I've visited far too many espresso businesses where not only did the drink taste bad, but the customer service seriously lacked. Sometimes I wonder if the owner of the business was trained properly themselves, or do they ever visit their own location. I say this only because our industry should grow and become better, not worse. Through years of experience and making mistakes in the past I can only offer what has worked for us.

With all of that being said, the grass is always greener on the other side, meaning if you don't own the business, it's always easy to say you are not being paid enough. Try to run the business yourself and see if you still feel the same.
 

janie1963

New member
Mar 8, 2004
65
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There is a sandwich shop we've been to 3 times and everytime the girls working are not not smiling, they move and act like robots. Yet they still have the nerve to place a big tip jar by the cash register. I was surprised to see the tip jar since this is a well known franchise. From the customer's prospective this kind of indifference tells me two things; the employees aren't happy in their jobs and the owner doesn't care at all about the customers. I'll never tip anyone who can't manage a smile or a simple "hello". I want my customers to feel that we care about them and that they are important to us. Why should they give us their business (hard earned $) if we don't treat them well?!
 

JerryB

New member
Nov 10, 2012
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Near Salt Lake City
I know this is a VERY OLD thread but I think it would be good if we update this to see if times have changed things much. After-all it has been over 11 sense this was a discussion. Would anyone care to share their more recent experiences? Can our industry support Obama's minimum wage hike?
 
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