What is your reaction to music in a coffeehouse?

mandaofdoom

New member
Dec 27, 2007
7
0
Have you ever been in one of those coffee shops that plays the worst music, and entirely too loudly?

Is there a "best" way to play music in a shop?

If you have an opinion--if you have an idea--voice it here!
 

Davec

New member
Oct 18, 2006
314
0
Old England (UK)
What's that saying;

"You can please all of the people some of the time and some of the people all of the time...but you can't please all of the people all of the time"
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,219
5
Near Philadelphia, PA
From my experience, I can honestly say that there have been many times when I was working behind the counter when the music was playing too loudly, and it was very difficult to hear what the customers were saying when they're placing their orders or asking questions about coffee drinks or pastries. They get annoyed when they have to repeat what they've already told you.

Also, when you're behind the counter, sometimes the sounds of the coffee makers, ice makers, blenders, etc.... combined with the sound of the music makes it difficult to hear the orders when they're being called out.

Customers mention that they don't like to be in a place with loud music. Between the music and all of the chatter...it turns what is supposed to be a relaxed experience into an Excedrin headache (for the customers and the employees).

The best way to keep almost everyone happy probably would be to play the music on the low speaker setting. That way it would be there for atmosphere, but it wouldn't be distracting and nerve wracking.

Rose
 

John P

New member
Jan 5, 2007
1,045
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Salt Lake City
It's about creating ambiance. If the music fits, it should fit seamlessly.
Each place has its own feel, its own crowd... its own music.
 

PinkRose

Super Moderator
Staff member
Feb 28, 2008
5,219
5
Near Philadelphia, PA
Speaking of ambiance, or lack thereof ...

This weekend, my friend and I stopped for dinner at a Chinese restaurant that recently opened in South Jersey. Instead of playing music in the background for ambiance, they had a large-screen television, and they were playing videos of old Celine Dion concerts.

The television was located at the top of a pole in the corner of the restaurant. I was sitting with my back to the TV, but I could still hear the concert. The person I was with kept looking at the screen saying "I can't believe they're showing old Celion Dion concerts." Although I sometimes enjoy Celion Dion's music, it's not what I wanted to listen to (or watch)while having dinner in a Chinese restaurant. It was very annoying.

There definitely was no ambiance there ... plus the food was mediocre. To top it off, when I ordered a Diet Coke, the waiter plopped down a glass, a can of soda, and a straw! I hate that!

Yes, ambiance, good food and drinks, and good service make a lot of difference in whether or not a customer comes back again.

Rose
 

caffe biscotto

New member
Jan 18, 2008
704
0
MASS.
A favorite coffee shop of mine actually transformed into a Latin fiesta joint once per month on a Saturday night.
A d.j. would come in to mix salsa and merengue cds. There would be salsa dance lessons, in which I gladly participated.
My ex is from S. America and she taught me everything I know. Props to her. :D

They even had a liquor license but only served Newcastle and some other beer and some wines. They also had a nice line up of pastries, mini quiches, salads, etc. to choose from.
I must admit though, the music made the place into something that wasn't coffee anymore. Not for me anyway.
Blues music is best for a coffee shop.
 

thoc

New member
Mar 24, 2008
8
0
Hamtramck
I like to think that music and musicians help make a coffeehouse, and the house helps make the musician/music. A lot of acts get started that way…or did anyways

...and I agree blues is lovely for a coffeehouse as is jazz, and latin /rumba type stuff. hmm, even romantic period classical piano, cello, and violin fits nicely on occasion.
 

captainbrew

New member
Feb 19, 2008
4
0
One thing you have to be careful about if you work at a coffee shop & playing cd''s is that you can get in trouble by (cant remember the government agency name sorry) because you don''t have consent of the artist to play at a buisness. Even though every artist would love their music played it''s the world we live in now. I know this because I worked at a coffee shop a few years back when we got in trouble for it. Advice I can give is to get XM radio and play something mellow. People want to relax not feel like they need to be at a gym.
 

CCafe

New member
Aug 11, 2004
1,557
0
Des Moines, Iowa
BMI is one of the companies that require royalty payments in order to play cds.

Also if you have live performances you are required to pay royalty payments for this too. Mainly because a lot of bands play a cover songs and you are required to make the payment, not the band.
 

Coolray

New member
May 2, 2008
2
0
da UP
It's not only in coffee shops

Loud music is a bane almost everywhere. From the pump to the (fill it in yourself). I don't know why so many places think I want to listen to (fill it in) when I am (fill it in).

Coolray
 

CCafe

New member
Aug 11, 2004
1,557
0
Des Moines, Iowa
caffe biscotto said:
I wonder if you need permission to show a pay-per-view event in a coffee shop, or any type of retail shop for that matter.

Yeppers and you'll most likely never get it. I remember years back HBO sued some places that would host a party at a bar that were showing prize fights.

The argument is that everyone should have to pay to see the fight and the bar was profiting from the fight and not HBO.
 
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