2 Group Machine for Start Up

YourAce

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Feb 9, 2006
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Any suggestion for a new 2 group machine. I am just entering the idea of opening a shop myself. I am also looking into hiring a consultant to assist with the set up, but I am trying to get my arms around some of the initial cost. I am sure this is one of, if not, the most expensive part of the shop. I have tried to look on line, and have seen plenty, but some advice would be helpfull. I appreciate any and all comments.

I am looking for real estate in prime areas, so I would anticipate the machine will see great use.

Thanks!

:?
 

Bean Tech

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Jun 28, 2006
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Orlando,FL
Look at the N.S. Aurelia, 10 year warranty on the boiler, auto back washing feature, auto steam wand, looks great, and much much more. It will run you about 7000 plus filters, shipping, and install. Where are you located at?
 
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YourAce

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Bean Tech,

First.. Thanks for the response!

I am in Burlington NJ, southern part of the state if you’re not from or familiar with the state. I would like to open something local, but don’t think the area is a right fit for my idea, which is an upscale internet cafe. There are area's within my county that I am looking towards, but space is limited or very expensive.

In reading the discussions held in this forum, I have a lot to learn, but I feel my business plan is strong, but the first piece of this venture is location, which is ideal in any situation.

With that said, thanks again for the response!!

YourAce
 

ArcticRat

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Nov 24, 2004
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Wife uses the N.S. Aurelia, she loves it. as Bean Tech says it has a lot of nice features, of course wife uses the auto steam wand as a stop for her steaming pitcher.. go figure.... dont think ive ever seen her use it. We purchased it from the local roaster at cost plus shipping. they installed it and provided a 6 months parts and labor warrenty over what N.S. supplies. cost was $5880.00. i would check with the local roasters, some even can supply the other items like grinders, blenders ect.,
 
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YourAce

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Feb 9, 2006
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ArcticRat...

Thanks for the reply, and that is a great tip. I havent found a local roaster as of yet, closest is about 2hrs north of me, but I hope to find one closer.

That price is amazing, I havent seen anything in that range yet. I hope to find the same deal as you suggested.

Once again, thanks for your note and the great advice!!!!

YourAce
 
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YourAce

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La Crema,

I would think its obvious I am quite new to this industry, hence the question(s) I have asked. I have been presently surprised by the suggestions and advice I have received, and I am most thankful for the time taken by each person.

"Why Look for one CLOSER? Hmm, Why not look for the BEST? Also, I hate to be so bold: but how much do you know about this buisness?"

I was told.... that I should find a roaster close to where the shop will reside. Keeping that advice in mind, I though 2 hrs away was far, but from your tone maybe that isn’t that far, or that location doesn’t matter?? It's the quality, which I am aware of, of the product that matters most.

At this point, I am trying to learn from sites like this one and reading as much as possible. I haven’t invested anything more than my time, and hope that equates to opening a shop of my own. If at any point I do find that I am over my head, well I will have gained some knowledge about this industry and will have a better understanding \ greater respect for each who has tried, and for those who have succeeded.

I am always open to any advice or suggestions. By viewing and posting on this site I look to those who have the experience and will continue to answer my inquiries, regardless of what’s posted. I am sure I am not the first to ask a question, which seems to make no sense to some one who is established in this industry.

Thank you for your time and response.

Regards.
 

MrBox

New member
Feb 21, 2006
67
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Statesboro, GA
If coffee shops are ment to bring a community together I think choosing
a local or nearest roaster is important.

I think supporting your regional economy is important especially if your trying to put a community image forth.

Even towns like this (small and in the south) one have a handful of roasters in within 5 hours from here.

JM
 

equus007

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Apr 4, 2006
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Austin, Tx
first

first question you should ask is "what type of machine do I want?".

Automat or traditional?

I personaly hate automat machines...have no character and limit what a good barista can do but they are easier to use and less hassle for inexperienced baristas. They look like a crappy box and are more expensive to fix/buy(sin warranty). However, with your lack of experience I would probably get a new automat unless you can find a good service tech in your area(there should be several near you). If you are strapped for start-up cash you can always buy used equipment but find someone to check it out first.

Its alot like buying a car...if you aren't a mechanic you need to have it looked at by one...and the more fancy doodads it has the more doodads it has to be broken.

If you buy a new machine read the warranty section very carefuly. Remember that if your machine goes down you might as well close shop until it is fixed. If the company you choose doesn't guarentee repairs in 24 hrs don't buy from them. Espresso machines break down regularly.

Going with a local roaster is a good idea if there is a good one near you. They are generaly much more flexiable and can do emergency orders more easily. They are also generaly more open to doing special("signature") roasts which can really set you apart from the competition.
Smaller roasters are sometimes a bit difficult to deal with(they think of themselves as artists) but can also be your best friend if you take the time to culture a friendship with them.

Your choice in machines will not be your greatest start-up cost. Construction will. Getting the plumbing and wiring set costs an arm and a leg unless you have some connections or find a site that is already set up.

Another suggestion...CoffeeForums is the best forum site I have found for the coffee biz. Take some time to read past posts they can really help out.
 
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YourAce

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equus007,

First, thanks for your response. Ok, here we go....

I actually really like Bean Tech's suggestion, the N.S. Aurelia. I have researched this machine, and you have touched on a lot of points (about a machine) that is offered with this purchase. Such as, training (use and how to maintain machine), 24 hrs service in case the machine is down....there are some more, just highlighting some of your great points.

You are correct; this probably won’t be the most expensive item. I am actually lucky that I do have a neighbor who is a HVAC \ Plumbing contractor, and his dad is an electrician. He has offered his help if I do proceed with the shop, and has plenty of other contacts as well for other parts of setting up the shop.

If I do proceed with this, I don’t think I would mind paying for the better machines, if their reliability and return is worth the additional cost. This would also include a roaster. I do like the idea of working closely with a roaster for my own signature blend. What that might be.. I do have ideas in mind, but would like to sample my ideas before getting to happy!!! Some times I read too much which could get me in trouble!!! LOL

I really appreciate the time you took to respond. I spend any where from a 1-2 hrs a night, reading other postings. YOU ARE CORRECT; I do feel I have learned a great deal from other questions and advice posted!!!

THANKS AGAIN :eek:

YourAce
 

ontrees

New member
Jun 9, 2006
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N.S. Aurelia

Hi there,

Sounds like you are at that exciting and fun stage of a shop. Putting it together is one of the greatest parts of having a coffee shop.

Before I talk about the Aurelia, I'm actually a fan of simple older machines - two group Rancilio semi-automatics from the late 80s or early 90s - easy to redo the wiring and clean out the boilers - replace the switches and solenoids and you'll have a reliable machine, but if you have the money ......

The Aurelia is a great machine. I just opened a shop three weeks ago and bought an Aurelia, V model I think, and it is great.

It isn't what the super fancy baristas will tell you is the best, but for an all around machine it has great features. It has a soft infusion system on the group heads - spreads out the water pressure for a couple seconds and then goes to full pressure - makes pulling a good shot a little easier. We still adjust the grind throughout the day, but so much better than any machine I have worked on.

It is an automatic machine, I've trained everyone to just use the semi-automatic buttons - on and off - when pulling shots. It helps for consistancy and doesn't let people cheat or not pay attention to their shots.

Steaming is good too, we didn't get the automatic steam wand, but I'm opposed to those, you'll never get a perfect drink using one.

It also has one of the best in the industry temperature controls, helps for shot consistancy.

Also has a larger boiler so you'll never run cold.

The only thing that worries me so far is a loud noise when running the hot water - sounds crunchy or something.

Anyway, hope that helps.

Eric
www.coffeeshopguy.com (just put it up two days ago, will add more soon)
email - coffeeshopguy@gmail.com
 

ArcticRat

New member
Nov 24, 2004
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ontrees "The only thing that worries me so far is a loud noise when running the hot water - sounds crunchy or something."


Interesting .... wife has used the Aurelia for almost a year and I cant remember the hot water making any noise. Now I'm goig to have to check it out.
 

morrisn

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Mar 27, 2006
126
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We have an Aurelia as well and it is an excellent machine, very good on its thermal qualities as well. It will not draw in cold water to the boiler while a shot is being extracted. It is a very well thought out machine with a lot of great features
 

DavesLT

New member
Nov 6, 2005
64
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Missouri
Your Ace, it sounds as if you have already figured this out on your own, but I definitely suggest that you stick to an espresso machine that you can get local support for when it is required. Especially if you plan on using a super-automatic instead of a standard machine as they are all prone to problems. The more moving parts, the more there is to break, and if you are in a remote area it is usually near impossible to find a qualified service agent, which is why I prefer traditional machines.

Good luck, and feel free to browse my website which has a lot of useful info for newbies. -Dave
 
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