Bean distributors in the Midwest

coffeesnob

New member
Sep 3, 2004
1
0
Michigan
Hi, I was wondering if anyone could help me out. I am fairly new to Michigan and am looking for a quality[/b] wholesale espresso bean distributor/roaster for a cafe we will be opening up. Comming form Portland , OR where coffee is taken pretty seriously and access to it is great I am feeling overwhelmed by where and who to look for. I would appreciate any information on this. :grin:
 

h2hcofe

New member
Sep 5, 2004
1
0
Saginaw, MI
Michigan Roasters

I'm fairly new to Michigan too, from San Diego, CA. I've got family in Aloha, Oregon. My wife and I are opening a "house" here in Saginaw. :grin: Many places around here use Paramount Coffee out of Lansing. Frankenmuth Roastery in Frankenmuth,MI (South Saginaw County) Cadillac Coffee Co. is used around here a bit (Cadillac, MI), as is Coffee Express Co. out of the Detroit Area. For other options do a search of Michigan Coffee Roasters. FYI: The Michigan Restaurant Show is coming to Novi, MI (N.Detroit) mid-Oct. Checkout www.coffeeexpressco.com for a link to find out more. It's great stuff for a cheap price. :D Later...
 

common_grounds

New member
Sep 5, 2004
3
0
Southern Indiana
not solely MI

speaking for our coffeeshop, we're looking nationwide for what we enjoy most. however, there are several roasters out of st. louis that offer equipment and maintenance due to the fact that we're in their service area.

unfortunately, i've yet to be sold on their products, and my partners are interested in finding someone with a fantastic espresso blend, drip options, and a willingness to provide equipment.

i think i'm the purist of the bunch, and i'd rather have high quality beans and buy/lease the equipment, but costs, etc...

any ideas on how to make us all happy?
 

Coffee Guy

New member
Oct 19, 2003
874
0
Seattle,Washington USA
Hi common_grounds:

Sometimes there are advantages to having a local roaster but only if they can fulfill all of your needs. It sounds nice that one of those roasters can offer the use of equipment, but remember they will make up the cost of the equipment in the price of their coffee. We are no different, we would do the same. However, your option is a better one, i.e., purchase your own equipment, this way you'll pay it off faster and possibly get it at a better price. Also with the industry growing as it is, you should be able to find a service person just about anywhere. I would recommend that you and your partners learn as much as possible about your espresso machine that way you can save alot of money on maintenance by doing it yourselves and only call in a tech when it's something you can't handle. Now you can concentrate on finding great coffee :wink:

Just a few thoughts you might want to take into consideration.
 

espressomaniac

New member
Jul 8, 2004
67
0
Tacoma
I agree with Coffee Guy

I gotta agree with you coffee guy, you are dead on with having them pick their own machine and grinder, own it themselves, leaving their purchases of beans unabated.

I know from personal experience, even in the early days, most roasters shipped out of state, much of the time the beans are still warm when they hit the shipping company, so you can be assured a high degree of freshness, coffee in general is rather forgiving in this area as well, so a day or 2 will make zero difference in how it's going to taste, if you are pushing it to 8-10 days, then you are doing just that, pushing it, but any decent roaster should get them to you well before that time frame.

Referencing back to the equipment "loaners" while they use your beans, you are right on in that area as well, the profits are in the beans, not the machines when you run it this way, I've always considered it a scary concept from day one though. 1st, you don't know what kind of abuse the equipment is going to endure "I assume the other local roaster is loaning you a used machine and grinder", so you may be getting something that may not prove to be as reliable as something you've purchased new and know it's history. 2nd, the loan"ie" can just pack it away and leave town. 3rd, you are adding yet another equasion into the variable, when I choose my beans, I do so for the quality and supply availability, not because I can't afford the equipment, I consider your primary initiation in this industry is purchasing your equipment correctly. Either go used and learn how to replace o rings, or invest some real cash into decent equipment, the asprin budget will go down and the profit margins will go up.
 
Dang. I didn't come in here to pimp for my company - this was supposed to be a break from my day job. Well, it seems that we might be in a good position to help you. Great coffee, a wide variety of equipment options from super-automatics to pour overs, local support, a company with a growing national presence (we are not going to disappear and leave you hanging).

If you send me an e-mail, I'll send you the contact information for someone who can help you. I think it will be a good fit. If nothing else, you'll get some good information and a local contact.

-James
 

BaristaTrainer

New member
Oct 18, 2004
192
0
Portland, OR
Wait Coffee Guy and I are in agreement? ;) jk

Yes, buy your own equipment, then negotiate with a roaster on price per pound. You will be saving money the long run. Most major machine companies have multiple techs in just about every urban area. I also recommend looking for training independently outside of your equipment dealer and roaster (depending on the roaster), there are a few that offer the right training out there.

Dallis Coffee in NY is great and they ship all over the place.

Good luck!
 

jpscoffee

New member
Nov 3, 2004
92
0
Michigan
Any MI or midwest people, send me an email. I am in MI and have lots of opinions. I use three roasters right now. 2 main and 1 very little. BTW, I am not a roaster.
 

ourcoffeebarn

New member
Nov 8, 2004
174
0
Wisconsin
Midwest Roaster

Hello

I just joined this forum and I am a web-based small batch coffee roaster and home espresso equipment distributor, I ship all over the country check out my site to see what you think http://ourcoffeebarn.com/estore I don't mean to be selling but I thought you might like to have anther option that is in the Midwest
 

sld

New member
Nov 3, 2004
11
0
I only know from drinking their coffee that the roasterie is really good. Thay are in KCMO. You should look them up. I think their website is theroasterie.com.
 
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